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fertility question for V the V or anyone else

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Anonymous

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I had my bull tested this week since I seem to have cows that are still open after 4 months with him. The vet said he did not produce enough semen to bother testing. Is this a common type of fertility problem? Also, could low copper or anything else cause this that I can fix? I hate to waste what should be a good bull and buy another just to have the same problem.

My vet said he would just get a new bull, but I have a small herd and can't afford to just throw away money. Yes I know keeping a bull that is not producing for very long would be wasting money as well, but like I said, I just don't want to go through getting a new bull to have the same thing happen.

thanks.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Fertility test your bulls before you buy them. I can't imagine why in the hell you wouldn't. Sell the other one now you'll probably pound him out for as much as you paid for him.

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Anonymous

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BlackPower's reply was a little harsh, but true. I would say that most reputable seedstock breeders provide a fertility test certificate on any bulls they sell. If you purchased the bull from a seedstock breeder versus sale barn or trader, he/she may still guarantee the bull and either trade it out for a new one or offer a discount on another one.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Also agree. All of our breeding age bulls are jumped, tested, and semen collected/stored (one is pending collection). Any bull we sell has their semen evaluation report given to new purchaser as well as other health records and registration papers. We keep the collected semen.

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Anonymous

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Generally speaking, if a bull fails his BSE, it's time to send him on his way. However, if he is a bull you would like to keep and don't mind feeding, keep in mind the semen he "donated" for the fertility test is semen he created 2 months ago. Was the weather unusually hot at that time? Did he have a fever for any reason? Did he have an infection of any kind? Any of those factors can cause low fertility testing a couple of months down the road.

A very young bull can have trouble producing semen during a BSE when he is artificially stimulated, but if you have open cows after 4 months, I'd sure consider selling or butchering him.

You could re-test him in a month or so if you're willing to keep him and feed him. But, that might not be the most economically sound decision. By all means, talk to the breeder you bought from before you do anything with the bull.

> I had my bull tested this week
> since I seem to have cows that are
> still open after 4 months with
> him. The vet said he did not
> produce enough semen to bother
> testing. Is this a common type of
> fertility problem? Also, could low
> copper or anything else cause this
> that I can fix? I hate to waste
> what should be a good bull and buy
> another just to have the same
> problem.

> My vet said he would just get a
> new bull, but I have a small herd
> and can't afford to just throw
> away money. Yes I know keeping a
> bull that is not producing for
> very long would be wasting money
> as well, but like I said, I just
> don't want to go through getting a
> new bull to have the same thing
> happen.

> thanks.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Thanks all, I guess I should have included some facts. I bought the bull as a 3 in 1 with his mother when he was only 5 mths old. I had purchased several other cows that were already bred and I figured this would be a good way go get a good bull. If/when I purchase a bull it will be tested first. I was just getting started and had not realized the frequency that bulls don't get the job done.

Anyway, I looked back and indeed he had an injured hoof 2 months ago. We have decided to pen him up and feed him for 2 months and retest. We will get a different bull to breed our cows for a late season. Oh well, I had been considering changing our season to fall anyway so I guess it all works out in the end.

thanks again, Roy
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
There are a few different reasons why the bull didn't produce enough semen to bother testing. One would be poor testicular development, which you would be able to see and feel. One could be infection, which you can test for. Or blocked epididymis from infection or trauma. Or lack of libido... or pain on ejaculation from spomdylosis (usually found in older bulls...) There are likely lots of things I haven't thought of, but I'm quite tired and have jet lag.

My recommendation would be to figure out which is likely and go from there. Most if not all are PERMANENT and would necessitate culling the bull. Buy a bull from a breeder with a GUARANTEE for breeding soundness. Any questions, just ask! Good Luck! V
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
I had the same thing happen with a four year old Angus bull that I used on my commercial beef herd. Took him to the sale barn and he brought a little over what I paid for him 15 months prior. Purchased an eighteen month old registered Angus for less than what i got at the sale barn for the non-fertile bull. The breeder I bought my new bull from loaded up and hauled him to my Vet and I paid for the test. I'm hoping this one doesn't go bad anytime soon.
> I had my bull tested this week
> since I seem to have cows that are
> still open after 4 months with
> him. The vet said he did not
> produce enough semen to bother
> testing. Is this a common type of
> fertility problem? Also, could low
> copper or anything else cause this
> that I can fix? I hate to waste
> what should be a good bull and buy
> another just to have the same
> problem.

> My vet said he would just get a
> new bull, but I have a small herd
> and can't afford to just throw
> away money. Yes I know keeping a
> bull that is not producing for
> very long would be wasting money
> as well, but like I said, I just
> don't want to go through getting a
> new bull to have the same thing
> happen.

> thanks.



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OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
> I had the same thing happen with a
> four year old Angus bull that I
> used on my commercial beef herd.
> Took him to the sale barn and he
> brought a little over what I paid
> for him 15 months prior. Purchased
> an eighteen month old registered
> Angus for less than what i got at
> the sale barn for the non-fertile
> bull. The breeder I bought my new
> bull from loaded up and hauled him
> to my Vet and I paid for the test.
> I'm hoping this one doesn't go bad
> anytime soon.

Most reputable seedstock breeders (registered breeders) will have a BSE at their own expense before dilivering the bull. Most will take back a bull that doesn't do the job. Their reputation is at stake.



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