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Fencing Question

ffscj

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On a recent trip to OK i noticed that most of the fencing was metal instead of treated posts. I understand the cost of the metal poles is a factor and the ease of placement. What I found unusual was the use of metal piping for H-braces and end posts. Why?
 

Campground Cattle

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ffscj":370p1pql said:
On a recent trip to OK i noticed that most of the fencing was metal instead of treated posts. I understand the cost of the metal poles is a factor and the ease of placement. What I found unusual was the use of metal piping for H-braces and end posts. Why?

I use either cross ties or pipe for H braces, all metal t post due is keep the wire seperated. The strength of your fence is in H braces if built correctly. As far as why I use pipe at my age I have got this fence building down, and in my wet creek bottoms pipe holds up better.
 

TXBobcat

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ffscj":393iyou8 said:
What I found unusual was the use of metal piping for H-braces and end posts. Why?

I prefer a good 6-strand barb wire fence with 6 1/2' metal T-posts, spaced 10' apart, as line posts. About every 75', place a 2 3/8" metal pipe post. For H-posts and corners I like to make them out of 4 1/2" and 2 3/8" pipe, concreted as far as I can get them in the ground. In my opinion, that makes a nice stout fence.

As far as you question about why a lot of fences are made out of pipe in this part of the country, I would say one reason is because there is a lot of oil and gas in this area of the country. Several years ago you could find oilfield pipe pretty cheap, but it's getting harder to find these days. Also, in many parts of Texas, we don't have as many tress that are good for making big heavy corner posts. Personally though, since I like to weld, I prefer to build everything out of metal because I think it looks cleaner and neater than wood corners or H braces.
 

ffscj

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Thanks for your responses. I'm looking to buy some property in eastern OK and was was just wondering. I do want to build some wooden fence around the house, so I guess I'm wantin' to know if the poles will last or will they need to be replaced frequently. If so I guess I'll need to learn to weld so I can build the metal ones. :)
 

la4angus

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ffscj":16d8453v said:
Thanks for your responses. I'm looking to buy some property in eastern OK and was was just wondering. I do want to build some wooden fence around the house, so I guess I'm wantin' to know if the poles will last or will they need to be replaced frequently. If so I guess I'll need to learn to weld so I can build the metal ones. :)
Depends on what kind of tree you are using for poles and if they are pressure treated.
 

ffscj

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hmmm, I'd never thought of using nontreated posts. Only seen treated posts used here in FL and since I've never lived anywhere else I haven't been exposed to their use. You learn something everyday...
 

la4angus

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ffscj":qbb9agyu said:
hmmm, I'd never thought of using nontreated posts. Only seen treated posts used here in FL and since I've never lived anywhere else I haven't been exposed to their use. You learn something everyday...
Take a drive through parts of W. Texas, New Mexico, Utah, Arizona and other High Country dry states. You will see fences that looks like that they have been there since the beginning of time.
I've seen fences made of branches piled on top of one another. Several years later they are still there. All weathered to a beautiful silver grey color.
 

la4angus

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ffscj":38ekyxx0 said:
I guess the dryness in those areas would make a difference. Too wet for part of the year to try it here.
They would last a few months here!!!!!!!
 

dun

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In the mojave desert an untreated wooden post will last nearly forever. A steel post will rot away in 5-10 years. Chemical makeup of the soil.

dun
 

Craig-TX

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The best “natural” wood post in the world, or in this part of the world anyway, is bodark. The wood gets so hard when it cures that you can’t hardly drive a staple into it, much less cut it with an ax or saw. It’s extremely strong wood and will last for decades. Now that pipe has taken over for corners and stretch posts it’s just a thorny pest tree. Some folks swear their apples have near-magical powers, keeping bugs out of the house, etc. It is amazing to see a bodark post that you know has been in the ground for at least 50 years and is still in good shape.

Craig-TX
 

dun

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Craig-TX":m8ccqwv2 said:
The best “natural” wood post in the world, or in this part of the world anyway, is bodark. The wood gets so hard when it cures that you can’t hardly drive a staple into it, much less cut it with an ax or saw. It’s extremely strong wood and will last for decades. Now that pipe has taken over for corners and stretch posts it’s just a thorny pest tree. Some folks swear their apples have near-magical powers, keeping bugs out of the house, etc. It is amazing to see a bodark post that you know has been in the ground for at least 50 years and is still in good shape.

Craig-TX

If they would only grow straight they'ld be perfect. As is they're still darn good

dun
 

Campground Cattle

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Craig-TX":35gw9kn2 said:
The best “natural” wood post in the world, or in this part of the world anyway, is bodark. The wood gets so hard when it cures that you can’t hardly drive a staple into it, much less cut it with an ax or saw. It’s extremely strong wood and will last for decades. Now that pipe has taken over for corners and stretch posts it’s just a thorny pest tree. Some folks swear their apples have near-magical powers, keeping bugs out of the house, etc. It is amazing to see a bodark post that you know has been in the ground for at least 50 years and is still in good shape.

Craig-TX

Its actually bois d arc from the French explorers, they noticed that the Indians prefered it for making bows. It is still very popular for bowyers in making bows. I have some I made years ago that are still deer hunting today.
 

dun

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Craig-TX":27x2qd1r said:
Same thing. Or Osage Orange, or Crabapple, etc.

Craig-TX

Around here crabapple or wild crab is a totally different tree - Malus Ionsis.
Bo d'Arc, hedge, Osage-Orange are all the same - Maclura Pomifera

dun
 

Craig-TX

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dun":3dipknct said:
Craig-TX":3dipknct said:
Same thing. Or Osage Orange, or Crabapple, etc.

Craig-TX

Around here crabapple or wild crab is a totally different tree - Malus Ionsis.
Bo d'Arc, hedge, Osage-Orange are all the same - Maclura Pomifera

dun

Well, I’m going with you. I’ve only heard it called crab apple every now and then and it seems like it's never a “local” using that term. From time to time we’ve had cows that would pick them up and chew on them. Most don’t pay any attention to them.

Craig-TX
 

Campground Cattle

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Craig-TX":2xoevr0s said:
dun":2xoevr0s said:
Craig-TX":2xoevr0s said:
Same thing. Or Osage Orange, or Crabapple, etc.

Craig-TX

Around here crabapple or wild crab is a totally different tree - Malus Ionsis.
Bo d'Arc, hedge, Osage-Orange are all the same - Maclura Pomifera

dun

Well, I’m going with you. I’ve only heard it called crab apple every now and then and it seems like it's never a “local” using that term. From time to time we’ve had cows that would pick them up and chew on them. Most don’t pay any attention to them.

Craig-TX


Crab apple trees actually bear fruit and are used for making jellies and jams. They commonly grow east of the Trinty river in East Texas
is any of a wide variety of small trees that bear apples less than 2 inches (5 centimeters) in diameter. About 25 species of crab apple trees grow wild in the Northern Hemisphere. Most of them originated in Asia. About 7 species are native to North America. In addition, hundreds of cultivars (cultivated varieties) of crab apple trees have been produced. Most of these cultivars are grown for use as landscape trees, especially in urban areas. Some are raised for their edible fruits, which are mostly used for making jellies.
http://www.trees-online.com/types_of_trees/mayhaw.shtml

From several points of view the Osage Orange is a tree
of extraordinary interest.The historian will tell you that
long before the settlement of America by the whites,the
Indians used the wood for war-clubs and bows, a custom
that gave rise to one of its common names "Bow-
Wood"and that its other common name is due to the fact
that it was introduced into cultivation among the earliest
settlers in St.Louis by specimens procured from the Osage
Indians.Also during the developement of the great prairie
region beyond the Mississippi the species served an
important purpose as a hedge plant,thousands of farmers
utilizing it for fencing their fields.The new growth hedge
was interwoven to make a tight fence.

Although the introduction of barbed wire greatly
reduced the importance of these hedge fences.These
remaining Hedge Rows now are an excellent source for
Hedge Posts.

Osage Orange is of interest from root to fruit.The bark
of the roots is of a bright orange color and furnishes a
yellow dye;the ridged and scaly bark of the trunk furnishes
tannin for making leather;the branches have attractive
leaves with thorns at their bases;the pollen-bearing and
seed-bearing flowers are borne upon seperate trees.

These round heads mature into one of the strangest
fruits known to science:the so-called "Hedgeapple" is a
greenish compound fruit made up of a large number of
seed-bearing fruits grown together on their edges.

The Osage Orange can be propagated very easily and
makes good hedges and also a bushy tree that when loaded
with fruit attracts much attention.The wood is also
relatively immune from insect and fungis attack.

The Osage Orange has been recorded to heights of over
60 feet and trunk diameters of 4 to 7 feet.

Texas,Oklahoma,and Arkansas are its sites of original
growth...........
 

hillbilly

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You folks are teachin me stuff every day.
We have a town here in SW missouri called Bois d arc, always wondered about that.
We call those trees hedge apples, the posts last forever and thus sell real well at our local sale barn every saturday.
I work in the steel industry and prefer steel in all working facilities but still prefer a good hedge post corner.
The wood burns so hot it will burn your house down if you cant shut it down.
Hillbilly
 

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