Fencing material???

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Randyman

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Was wondering if anyone knows the going price for sucker rod, gaurd rail, and oil field pipe? Putting in new corrals and can't seem to find any prices on the net.
 

CattleAnnie

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For what it's worth, when we put up our new working corrals and calving pens, we used 'cement wire'. It was far more economical than traditional page wire type fence, and there is no possible way for them to bust out, through or over it. We capped it with rough sawn planks, and haven't had any trouble ( we put the bulls through this corral system, and believe me, if anything was going to test the durability of it, they would be the ones).

Take care.
 

Campground Cattle

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Randyman":289tj235 said:
Was wondering if anyone knows the going price for sucker rod, gaurd rail, and oil field pipe? Putting in new corrals and can't seem to find any prices on the net.

Recently within the last year paid dollar a foot for drill stem to make a corral.
 

TXBobcat

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2 3/8" pipe is anywhere from .75 ft to 1.10 ft.

4 1/2" is anywhere from 1.65 to 2.40 ft.

Sometimes you can find split pipe on the low end of the price range. No matter what you are looking for as far as steel goes, it's going to be high right now. Steel prices have went way up, just like fuel.
 

dun

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5 1/2 ft T-posts are 3.29, a couple of months ago 6 footers were 2.09

dun


TXBobcat":1cgrgeq9 said:
2 3/8" pipe is anywhere from .75 ft to 1.10 ft.

4 1/2" is anywhere from 1.65 to 2.40 ft.

Sometimes you can find split pipe on the low end of the price range. No matter what you are looking for as far as steel goes, it's going to be high right now. Steel prices have went way up, just like fuel.
 

CattleAnnie

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One possiblity that a lot of people have taken advantage of up here is to pick up drill stem, cable, etc. from the oilpatch. There has been quite a few corrals built for next to nothing by using material salvaged from the patch.

The only thing I don't care for about pipe pens is that there is no "give" in that type of fencing. Bulls can get pretty busted up in a pen like that when they're settling the pecking order. Busted fence posts are preferrable to busted ribs on the stock.

Just a thought. Take care.
 

Running Arrow Bill

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Yes, steel prices are up. Here's a resource for pipe (new and used) and other steel items. J & I Manufacturing in Madill, OK. (580) 795-7377.

Last pipe we bought over past 3-6 months (not from J & I) we paid .74 a ft for used 2-3/8" and about 90 cents for 2-7/8". Last year earlier we paid about the same from another supplier (Varner Pipe in Abilene, TX area) plus (I think) about $3 to $4 a stick for 5/8" sucker rod.

There is a lot of pipe and steel being advertised in the weekly paper, "Livestock Weekly". Might want to check this out.

I agree with another poster--rather run the slight risk of a bull or other animal getting injured by a pipe and rod corral or pen than letting one get loose and killing or damaging someone, their animals, or property. Better still--only buy and keep cattle with good temperaments--the wild ones make good eating!

Bill
 

TXBobcat

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D.R. Cattle":954oqge5 said:
I like the cows getting busted better than my corrals. Busted cows are still in your possession, busted corrals let 'em out on the road.

Same here! I just finished up the perimeter of a 64' x 64' pen made from 2 3/8" pipe and 5 'x 20' cattle panel. It is approx. 68" tall. We put a steer in the pen that we plan to feed out and, being a little wild at first, he immediately gave the pen a test. He tried going through it, climbing over it, and going under it, but so far he's still penned, and alot calmer! Guess he realized he ain't getting out, so he might as well lay around and just eat.

In my opinion, when building cattle pens, build it as tall and as sturdy as you can afford. It will definately save time when working cattle and I also believe it cuts down on injuries. Seems like cows were always jumping the fence and getting legs twisted/cut in all the old pens I've used.
 

D.R. Cattle

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I've seen snapped off fence posts do plenty more damage than any intact steel post will ever do. We had a vet remove one from a horse's abdomen one time and surprisingly the horse lived and did just fine. Steel will put a knot on their head but a busted post lacerates and stabs.
 

CattleAnnie

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We've never had an animal get out of the cement wire corrals, but it does have enough give in it to prevent injuries. It's not so much that my cattle are 'mean' or 'wild', they just don't appreciate being worked... can't blame them as they get vaccinated, tagged, branded, preg tested, and weaned through the system. Definately not a positive experience from their point of view, however limited that may be.

Last year had one old gal that was pretty determined not to go into the sorting corral to be pregtested, she lined up and hit that fence for all she was worth, and at 1500lbs, she had weight to go with the momentum. It was great. She hit it full speed, bounced right off, and even though she bloodied her nose, it was enough to persuade her to give up and get on with the program. On the other hand, I've seen firsthand two cows break their necks by hitting a pipe fence full steam. They weren't wild, just worked up from being sorted.

Anyway, to each their own, but I guess I've been fortunate enough with the system here, and just thought I'd suggest it as a cost efficient alternative. It's stood up very well through the years, doesn't need to be oiled or painted, and was very easy to build.

Take care.
 

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