Fence Line Weaning

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sstterry

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So, yes, he gave Covexin 8 to the 16 calves in September. If that was the only time he came out & gave shots, he wasted time & money if not boostered in 6 weeks. (I know - lots to learn!! LOL)
I looked a little closer at the invoice and it appears that the Vet was out a week later on the 29th. So, they were probably boostered. I am hesitant to criticize any Vet, unless I know exactly what they were facing and exactly what they did. It is hard to tell from an invoice.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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I am not trying to criticize the vet. Just know that many vets are not as well informed about vaccines as some of the producers. There are soooo many out there. You would think if he is carrying a brand, he would be familiar. I am only going on the fact the OP said he was out in September (assuming once) and I said "If that was the only time he came out". Also, if he was out in 1 week - that still does not follow the directions. They have a time schedule for a reason. Each one is a little different. I think if you did it in 5 or 7 weeks instead of 6 weeks, you would be OK. But not 1 instead of 6. Just trying to point out we need to be our own advocate. At least this vet is teaching him where to give shots properly. Here in NY, it is mainly dairy. Vets are used to walking down the center isle and giving shots in the rump to all the cows.
I taught "my" vets neck only.
 
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Adam Freeman

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Covexin 8
Poly-Bac B 3R
Super 7way
Ralgro
Inforce 3
Bovi-shield Gold BVD
Penicillin G

I am not trying to bad mouth your vet - but did he give these shots all at one time? Covexin 8 is a clostridium and Super 7?? don't know what that is but most "7's" are a clostridium also. Both are usually a killed vaccine - Covexin needs to be boostered in 6 weeks. Most 7's need to be boostered.
Inforce 3 is a GREAT product for calves - it is a MLV does not need booster, and BS BVD goes well with it to provide the BVD protection - but it also needs to be boostered. If a vaccine is not properly boostered in the time frame needed - you might as well pour it on the ground. It did ZERO to help the health of your calf. A killed vaccine first "primes" the body and sets it up, the 2nd shot is what kicks in the antibodies for the resistance to the bug.
No Pen should be given "randomly" - maybe you had active Pinkeye at the time??
If he gave these shots in two different visits - he should have used the same "brand" to booster the first shot. So, this is very confusing.
Just so you know, you can buy these products from Valley Vet or many other suppliers and give the shots yourself. Or you can buy the products from your own vet ( a little more money, but sometimes worth it for his/her advice).
Did he/she give the shots in the neck and explain to you "where" to give

Why did he give the 3 doses of Tetanus Antitoxin? Did you castrate 3 at that time?
Yes we had 3 that were castrated then that we had not gotten earlier in the spring.
 
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Adam Freeman

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50 doses of draxxin? Am I reading that right? Adam I think you have a vet problem.
No i bought a bottle of draxxin to have on hand for issues. Cheaper that way then having to take a sick calf in after hours and get them taken care of. We already had to do that earlier this year and that little visit cost me over 100 and we still lost the calf. So we bought a bottle to keep in case we needed it and have already used it twice now to treat some calves during this hot col hot cold bounce we keep having here.
 
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Adam Freeman

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I am learning a lot from him and you all and hopefully will be able to have a better year and get a system that works for me and helps my cows be the best. Based of the preg checks we did i should have a new crop of calves on the ground in march. I really need to figure out that should be done with them as soon as they hit the ground. Last year we did ear tag and fly tag but didn't have the knowledge or shots on hand for them. Going to try and do better with that this year. Would like to be able to do tags, shots, and weight. Last year I missed the first calf on the ground the first day and never could catch him after that till we got him in the chute. The rest we were lucky enough to be there the day thy hit the ground and got all the rest tagged.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Some on here give shots to newborns =- some don't. I do. I give a Selenium shot (Multimin 90 - used to use BoSe), a vitamin A&D shot, Inforce 3 nasal, dip the naval, eartag & weigh. Yes, you are right, if you don't get it done day 1 - can be a rodeo to catch,.
 

bird dog

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I wouldn't worry to much about the shots on day one. If your cows are gentle enough to let you do it and you are available to do it, that is great. It can help a lot. Saying that, I don't. Some of my cows are not to keen on you messin with their newborn, others I just don't get to in time. A third of my cows are 15 miles away so that group is always on their own.

My first shots are usually at about two months of age.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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@bird dog should know if Texas is SE deficient or not. "Most" states are. SE is major important to a newborn.
I calve in brutal winter. I have a small herd compared to some on here (run around 50 mommas). I calve them in pens. I put the cow out of the pen before handling her calf. Even if she is a "super tame" one. If a calf bawls while you are processing it, a tame sweetheart can turn into a raging killer. Be safe.
 

Dusty Britches

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Back to the original topic -

I've been fenceline weaning for years. I've found, net wire or barb wire lined with no climb is the best route - or hot wire. Calves will reach through the fence while momma stands along side so he can nurse.

A few years ago I saw an ad for Quite Wean plates. These are designed a little differently. The bright yellow means I can spot it quickly. I swear by these things. The instructions say to keep the plates in for 5-7 days but it seems to work better on my Brangus, who are stubborn, best for 7-10 days. Put them out with the cows for about 7 days. Re-pen, separate, pull the plates. mommas on the outside, babies on the inside. No one will cry. Mommas just wander off like, "you are on your own now!" Babies have learned to graze full time by then.

I like to keep them in the pens for a week or two to bunk break them and get them looking to me for extra food. Then I will move them to the pasture that separates them from mommas by as little as a 3 strand barb wire fence or as much as 2 or 3 pastures. Yes it is more work up front, but it saves me a lot of stress later on.
 

TCRanch

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@bird dog should know if Texas is SE deficient or not. "Most" states are. SE is major important to a newborn.
I calve in brutal winter. I have a small herd compared to some on here (run around 50 mommas). I calve them in pens. I put the cow out of the pen before handling her calf. Even if she is a "super tame" one. If a calf bawls while you are processing it, a tame sweetheart can turn into a raging killer. Be safe.
True!!! All bets are off! I also give newborns a First Defense bolus and if I administer the bolus first, it seems to catch the calf off guard, giving me time for the Inforce 3 & tagging before it starts bawling.
 

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CowboyRam

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Here is my experience with fence line weaning.

Day one: Sort calves off cows, we loaded them all up in the stock trailer to get a average weaning weight. Dump them in the pasture, they go right to grazing, but the cows on the other side of the fence a bawling their heads off. Put out a couple of the Sweet-Pro cattle kandy with stress relief for the calves, and loose mineral for the cows.

Day two: In the morning everything is Jake, all looks good. go back mid afternoon to put out a salt block, the cows broke the chain on the gate. It was one of those chains you would use to chain up a little dog, broke at the weld. Get the cows and calves in, sort one more time; turn out the cows, get them where they are supposed to be, and then turn out the calves.

Day Three: The calves are out grazing, just a few are hanging on the fence with near the cows; most of the cows are out grazing with a few on hanging on the fence.

I was kind of skeptical that it would, so far the new electric fence we put this summer is holding the calves in and the cows out.

We will see how day four goes tomorrow.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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I find fence line weaning to be so easy on the calves. Cows bawl, but are pretty content to have their calf lay next to her (opposite side of fence). I turn off all my other fence, so I have full power on the 4-strand separating them - about 7.
The first day, I have the cows grazing close. After that, I put them in the farthest field from the calves. They come to water next to the calves, but are less likely to spend as much time next to the calves. Calves have full grazing in a paddock they have been in before with dams, bale of hay, stress tubs, mineral. Happy campers.
I do not run them thru the chute prior to or during the separation. They've already had 2 full sets of shots, so they don't get their 3rd until after the stress of weaning.
 

Brute 23

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I do not like fence line weaning. It takes longer for our cows and calves to get back to their normal routine. I like to haul them completely off to a separate property to wean.

Having other calves that are already weaned where you are taking the weaned calves does help a lot. They tend to fall in with the group and go to feed, water, and grass faster and just handle better in general.

We were late getting to one place this year and a couple cows had calved already. It was very touchy to get them worked and separated. Had on momma trying to get under a gate and raising hell to get back to her calf. You had to keep an eye on them at all times.

When we weaned some of the bigger calves off I held them in the pen for 48hrs until the truck came to take them. Those calves mommas got in the corner of the pasture and hung out there and balled back and forth until they were gone. When the calves were hauled and gone, they went back out grazing with the herd.
 

SBMF 2015

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I've got one old cow, she is my favorite lead cow. She leads when we walk the cows home, leads when I call them, leads when she heard the feed tractor. But man is she a pain in the butt when I wean. She is never ready to give up her calf.
Two years ago I weaned the calves and hauled the cows back to pasture. The next morning she had gone through a fence, walked a quarter mile home and was bawling in the barnyard.
Last year I fence line weaned them. She didn't jump out, but she would stand parallel to a pipe gate so her calf could stick it's head through and nurse.
This year she has a pretty nice heifer calf. I'm going to put a weaned flap in the calf's nose and leave them together. We'll see if that keeps the old gal happy.
 
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aaronstiff

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I actually just tried fence line weaning for the first time a few weeks back, and I'm definitely going to do it again next year. Like everyone else is saying, they and the cows bawl for a few days but eventually they just lose interest. There was one calf that I really struggled to keep separated, but that was my fault for not putting up enough strands right from the start. They'll find a way through if you don't, so err on the side of too many. :) Just be prepared for a bit of pogging/muddy ground if weaning late in the year like me (November here in PEI is always incredibly muddy).
 

CowboyRam

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I actually just tried fence line weaning for the first time a few weeks back, and I'm definitely going to do it again next year. Like everyone else is saying, they and the cows bawl for a few days but eventually they just lose interest. There was one calf that I really struggled to keep separated, but that was my fault for not putting up enough strands right from the start. They'll find a way through if you don't, so err on the side of too many. :) Just be prepared for a bit of pogging/muddy ground if weaning late in the year like me (November here in PEI is always incredibly muddy).
I will probably do it again next year. Depend on how the calves sell in January compared to last year; I will know then if the extra feed I stuck into them was worth it. So my experience is good. I put up a new 5 wire electric fence this last summer, two out of the five wires are a ground wire, and so far everything is where they are supposed to be. We usually don't have to worry about muddy ground this time of year, and so far no snow on the ground yet. I think I can get by without feeding until about the middle of December, that is if we don't get any snow. Now last year I was making dust with the tractor when I went out to feed near the end of December; I hope this year is not that dry.
 

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