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Feeding by Truck - Bumpers vs. Bed

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Anonymous

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Our neighbor has been using a truck bale bumper for several years to put out his large round bales of hay. We are still doing it the "old fashioned" way by using our tractor. His truck seemed to go much faster. Has anyone else had much experience with using bale bumpers? (I think his is a brand name called Bramco (not sure of the spelling). Or experience with the bed mounted hay forks? On previous bale bumpers, he had damaged his truck bed from the bale rotating or slipping, but he has not this problem on his newer model. So far, the only disadvantages we could see is you can only feed one bale at a time and when it is really muddy you may need to go back to using a tractor. <p>We are located in Northeast Missouri and are also interested in finding other dealers for this hay handling equipment. So far we have only found the one that our neighbor purchased his from (but have not searched extensively). We are interested in shopping around and would like to look at other brands too.<p>Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks, Jennifer
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(User Above)":3h51jvnw said:
:My advice, and I also do it the "old Fashioned way" with a tractor<br>is to stick with the tractor, that's what it was designed for and I <br>feel it is much safer. How fast does one need to be. Hope you stick <br>with your tractor.<br>
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Anonymous

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Dew eze type flat beds are real popular around here.<br>They will haul (2) bales at a time & go down roads<br>faster than tractor. My hay fields & pastures are<br>spread out over 25 mile radius. I set most my hay on edge of<br>the hay fields. I even use it to move bales to side of fields.<br>it will unroll bales on ground or lift a 4 wheeler on back truck<br>You can also run acake feeder or hyd wire roller of its hyd pump<br>we string alot of temporary elec fence up on wheat fields.<br>--down side is the bed cost $5,000.00 & requires a p/u.<p><A HREF="http://www.deweze.com/products/agflatbd.html">DEWEZE</A>
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Anonymous

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(User Above)":1d40gzyy said:
: Our neighbor has been using a truck bale bumper for several years to put out his large round bales of hay. We are still doing it the "old fashioned" way by using our tractor. His truck seemed to go much faster. Has anyone else had much experience with using bale bumpers? (I think his is a brand name called Bramco (not sure of the spelling). Or experience with the bed mounted hay forks? On previous bale bumpers, he had damaged his truck bed from the bale rotating or slipping, but he has not this problem on his newer model. So far, the only disadvantages we could see is you can only feed one bale at a time and when it is really muddy you may need to go back to using a tractor. <p>: We are located in Northeast Missouri and are also interested in finding other dealers for this hay handling equipment. So far we have only found the one that our neighbor purchased his from (but have not searched extensively). We are interested in shopping around and would like to look at other brands too.<p>: Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks, Jennifer<p>What is a truck bale bumper? I have never heard of one let alone seen one! What exactly do they do? Are they used mainly on large farms?<br>
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A

Anonymous

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We ordered one this past weekend, so will have all the information soon. (brand, address, etc.) The flat bale beds are nice too, we just weren't ready to give up our bed. I think the price on our bumper (including overloads on our F250, both installed) was around $2100. We hope to sell our DMI bumper to help offset this cost a little.<p>A bale bumper replaces your existing bumper on your truck. The bale bumper has two long round hay forks (which may be removed) that are operated by a hydraulic pump. A controller unit is located in the cab of the truck. The forks can pivot slightly below horizontal to "stab" a bale and then you control how high to pivot the bale. You can buy (or make) a stop to prevent the bale from riding too close to your truck bed.<p>I'm not sure if they are mainly used on large farms. We own nearly 1000 ac and rent another 60 ac. However, this 60 ac is a few miles from our other farm. At this point, there is no winter water source on this 60, but the owner is putting a pond in this spring with a drinker and we are hoping to winter cattle there this year. We only have 2 tractors (we rent our crop ground out), 1 diesel & 1 gas. The gas tractor (no cab) fits in a shed in our cows' lot. The diesel (w/cab) is about 1/2 mi down the road. The 60 ac has no electric. Should we ever rent or own other ground, this bale bumper should allow us not to have to have a tractor at every place. You can also drive your truck faster than a tractor on the road. Control and safety has not appeared to be any problem. In fact, it is safer - especially when our 2 yr old son wants to go too (or anyone else for that matter). 2 in any tractor is not a good idea.<p>Our neighbor probably has about 400 cows spread over about 10 miles. He doesn't store hay at all locations. He just picks up a bale and takes it to a place whenever he goes that way and sets it near a gate. It appears to work out very well. During calving season he is checking cows several times and has the opportunity to move a bale in the process. It is easier to check cows from his truck too, that way if he needs to do anything with a calf he has all of his equipment in the truck.<p>We should have the bumper in about 2 weeks. If you would like any other information, just let me know. Will let you know how it works out.<p>Jennifer
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Anonymous

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(User Above)":9y3dwqtw said:
: cool! I have not ever seen one built into the <br>bumper before. I've seen spikes built into flat<br> beds , but never a bumper. Our TSC store has a spike<br>that sets on edge of bed & attaches to goose neck<br>hitch. It has elec/hyd pump. cost $1,000.00. <br>disadvantage is u can't use gooseneck with out <br>removing it which probably takes 20 min & (2) guys<br>or a loader.<br>
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Anonymous

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(User Above)":1iggecih said:
: : cool! I have not ever seen one built into the <br>: bumper before. I've seen spikes built into flat<br>: beds , but never a bumper. Our TSC store has a spike<br>: that sets on edge of bed & attaches to goose neck<br>: hitch. It has elec/hyd pump. cost $1,000.00. <br>: disadvantage is u can't use gooseneck with out <br>: removing it which probably takes 20 min & (2) guys<br>: or a loader.<p><br>We had seen these gooseneck hitches/bale movers before too and decided against them for the same reason. I'm not sure what it takes to remove the bale spikes on our new bale bumper, I imagine probably just a wrench. One thing I forgot to mention, is that you do remove the tailgate when using the bale bumper; but, I believe you can put your tailgate back on (if you want) and still travel with your hay spikes in the vertical position. Should have all the information here shortly (my husband actually ordered it and knows more about this).<p>
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