Feeder advice solicited

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Craig-TX

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My dad is getting up in years and has had some health issues recently. I’ve finally gotten him to the point where he’s willing to part with the money to get one of those bulk feeders that handle cake and cubes. We want the type that fits sideways across the front of a pickup bed. This picture is an example of the basic design.

We don’t have a flatbed and this example probably has a larger capacity than what we’re after, but it’s the basic concept. Around here they’re not uncommon but I’ve noticed they seem to be more customary to the North.

I’m interested in any advice regarding brands, features, designs, etc. that any of y’all might have to offer. The same goes for bulk hoppers. Thanks in advance.

Craig-TX
 

dun

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Have you given thought to the trailer/wagon types? Those seem to be the most common around here. Of course about the only ones that feed supplement are the dairys. I've seen those that run off of the PTO but there are also some that use a small gas engine to power it. It would be one more thing to find a place to park, but if you wanted to use the pickup you wouldn't have to put the thing in and out. Just misc. thoughts and ramblings

dun
 
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Craig-TX

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dun":1q0qrm00 said:
Have you given thought to the trailer/wagon types? Those seem to be the most common around here. Of course about the only ones that feed supplement are the dairys. I've seen those that run off of the PTO but there are also some that use a small gas engine to power it. It would be one more thing to find a place to park, but if you wanted to use the pickup you wouldn't have to put the thing in and out. Just misc. thoughts and ramblings

dun

You make excellent points but I’m doing all I can to get him to spend this much. As far as the onboard options go, I don’t want one so big that it will interfere with a gooseneck. These have a good 12V motor on them. The way I’m cost justifying it to him is the savings on buying bulk, which I think is around 20%. We’ve always bought it sacked and palletized. We’re down to where we only go through 10 or 12 tons per winter but long story short he needs to get away from that much lifting.

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dun

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Bulk is $1.00 per cwt less then bagged. For 3 tons they deliver for free. All of the mills around here run the same except some require 4 tons to deliver free, but they're 20 miles further away.
Since you also asked about bulk hoppers I'll throw this in. How are you planning on filling your feeder? If your bulk hopper is high enough that you can just gravity it into the feeder, insure that your feed mill can fill a hopper that high. Ours is 6 ton and the dumper is almost on the ground. A five gallon bucket won't fit under it without cutting a couple of inches off the top. The mills around here have a hard time getting high enough with tha auger and still get an angle that they can get the stuff into the hopper. We alwasy end up having to fasten somekind of adapter to direct the feed down instead of straight out when they get raised high enough. Used wagons aren't all that expensive (around here) and most will hold a couple of tons.
Just more rambling thoughts.

dun

Craig-TX":217be8nv said:
dun":217be8nv said:
Have you given thought to the trailer/wagon types? Those seem to be the most common around here. Of course about the only ones that feed supplement are the dairys. I've seen those that run off of the PTO but there are also some that use a small gas engine to power it. It would be one more thing to find a place to park, but if you wanted to use the pickup you wouldn't have to put the thing in and out. Just misc. thoughts and ramblings

dun

You make excellent points but I’m doing all I can to get him to spend this much. As far as the onboard options go, I don’t want one so big that it will interfere with a gooseneck. These have a good 12V motor on them. The way I’m cost justifying it to him is the savings on buying bulk, which I think is around 20%. We’ve always bought it sacked and palletized. We’re down to where we only go through 10 or 12 tons per winter but long story short he needs to get away from that much lifting.

Craig-TX
 
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Craig-TX

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Dun, this is exactly the type of input I was seeking. I’ve been wondering about the delivery limitations. Your point is well taken that some feed houses can handle higher hoppers than others. We don’t have that many choices and I don’t want to get into a captive situation where I’m limiting our ability to shop around. I’ll have to think about the used wagons. Initially they didn’t seem practical because we have wet winters and a lot of times it’s all you can do to get in and out of the pastures, much less pull something. The tractor wouldn’t be practical because of the distances between places.

I’m going to be out of town next week so don’t think I’m not interested in any additional thoughts – just won’t be able to get on-line. Thanks.

Craig-TX
 

dun

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A flex auger system on the bottom of the hopper can lift the stuff up and dump it some distance away, but you're looking at some serious bucks. Several smaller bins may be a better alternative, but then you're looking at serious bucks again.
Picking up 50# sacks and dumping them into the feeder may be an easier alternative in the long run then dozens of buckets full having to be dumped, or hauling the feeder to the mill periodically to have it filled. But that depends on frequency and volume.
We took over somebody elses wonderfull idea and now we're trying to figure out how to make it work for us.
We feed very little grain so it isn't a real problem, crappy job sometimes, but not a problem. Snow, ice and rain make it pretty miserable. During the breeding season they get a couple of mouth fulls whenever we have something to breed, that's how we get them to come up so we can seperate out the candidate that needs service.

dun
 

Howdyjabo

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We have one that looks to be half of the one you pictured. Where it has two angled sides ours has one angle and a flat back.
It works great!!!!
Ours we keep on an old tractor- but our neighbors got one and put it on his truck.
But you do need an auger extension to lift the feed up to it. And it wouldn't work on anything besides a flatbed- it wouldn't auger over the sides of a truckbed unless you raised it up and I don't think that would work well. .And in muddy conditions unless you are moving the feeding area regularyly it takes 4wd.Taking it on and off would be a pain.
Not sure if it would work with a goosneck trailer.. I'll ask hubby if it would interfere and find out where he got it- if you are interested.
 

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