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jcarkie

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i use 50/50 at 12% protien, that way they come to me thet like the light sweet taste.
 

Tc

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ive wanted to try hayledge but never knew how to get it up and keep it from spoiling.what steps do you take after its cut? thanks~~~~~~~~~~~Tc
 

dun

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You wrap it completly air tight in plastic.

dun


Tc":1gsz8pao said:
ive wanted to try hayledge but never knew how to get it up and keep it from spoiling.what steps do you take after its cut? thanks~~~~~~~~~~~Tc
 

Tc

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what would be the attvantages in haylege? seems like a lot more work and money and a pain in the butt to feed.~~~~~~~Tc
 

dun

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It does cost substantially more because of the cost of the plastic wrap and the rent or purchase of the wrapping machine. It should have higher feed value after it ferments and actually becomes silage. You feed it just like bales accept you have to remove the wrapper AND the string. The biggest advantage is when the weather doesn't co-operate you bale and wrap it at high moisture and it doesn't spoil.

dun


Tc":1qc6full said:
what would be the attvantages in haylege? seems like a lot more work and money and a pain in the butt to feed.~~~~~~~Tc
 

CattleAnnie

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Recently watched a video put out by a Quebec man who's promoting haylage. Very, very educational. He's done a thorough job researching the pros and cons of conventional round baling and haylage, and it sure made us think seriously about getting into it. The man in the video custom hayed as well as put it up for his own operation, was interested in an alternative and more time and cost efficient way of getting feed put up, and after studying the two systems now strictly uses the haylage method.

Now realise that it's been about three weeks since I saw it, but if the rain (yes, thank God, it's actually consistantly drizzling here for the first time this spring - and after last year's drought, we desperately need it) continues today, I'll try and view it again. If so, I'll jot down the key points and post, if anyone's interested. Just off the top of my head, I believe a few of them were:

a) less waste due to rot

b) more time efficient, as they must be baled at around 45% moisture(if I remember accurately)...so basically it's feasible that one can cut in the a.m. and wrap in the afternoon.

c) very palatable...ergo less waste due to cattle actually consuming more of the feed than baled hay.

d) high protien content...studies using dairy cows as a base showed a higher quantity of milk after feeding haylage compared to hay.

Take care.
 
A

Anonymous

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What exactly is haylege? And what equipment is needed for it? Would it be more or less costly for smaller pastures? The price of haying equipment keeps me from cutting my own pasture, as I only get around 12-15 round bales when I do have it cut.
 

dun

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Haylage is basicly baled hay that is wrapped air tight and ensiles (ferments) in the wrap. Baled silage. Any air holes and the stuff rots.

dun


Anonymous":1vcicm1h said:
What exactly is haylege? And what equipment is needed for it? Would it be more or less costly for smaller pastures? The price of haying equipment keeps me from cutting my own pasture, as I only get around 12-15 round bales when I do have it cut.
 

Tman

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Interesting! Anaerobic process, does this not convert some of the starch to alcohol ?
 

la4angus

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Tman":32zrw37o said:
Interesting! Anaerobic process, does this not convert some of the starch to alcohol ?
I had never thought of this!!!!!!
I may start eating Haylage.
 

shorty

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Making haylage has some benifits even though ther is a cost for the plastic (about $3.00 for a 4x4 bale) and you need wrapper and grabber for your loader. You save some work in field ,We mow on a windrow just about the width of the baler pickup and usually can bale the next day without raking ,bale at 40- 60 % moistures. that often means getting hay without rain if you tried to get it dry. You must take care not get holes in wrap I always keep duct tape on loader just in case also store bales out high grass and weeds so mice don't move inand live around bales. If done right you have high Quality feed which can store outside and the cows really like it. We still make dry hay in small bales for sale tohorse customers
 

Arancher

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The profit is too tight for me to feed. I feed good grass,hay when needed and work on the condition of pastures. The pastures take care of the feeding.
 
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