Favorite Anti Backup design?

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RDFF

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What's your favorite type of anti-backup device in a cattle lane, and why? Pics and/or links would be great!

I've not actually used anything other than a rod across the alleyway, but have seen the ones that hang from the top... my concern with them is they really limit your ability to be able to follow the cattle into the lane if you need to, and they're not the right height for anything other than the tallest animals in the group. The ones that swing forward on the side, including just little rods from each side, can slow down the animals, thinking that their "lane" is being blocked, and... they can get on top of them sometimes. Either will allow an animal to get under/around them if they figure it out....

So I'm looking to see what everybody thinks is THEIR "best in show", and why.
 

tsellars

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This is what I finally upgraded to. Only negative is you have to have that type of panel and would need one at each joint if needed, I just have one going into my lane (still use the t post in the lane if needed) Never had one back back through it or get it open after closed.

 

simme

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This is what I finally upgraded to. Only negative is you have to have that type of panel and would need one at each joint if needed, I just have one going into my lane (still use the t post in the lane if needed) Never had one back back through it or get it open after closed.

I have one of those. Plenty sturdy. Negative is that the slide is metal pipe on metal pipe and needs to be lubricated. Then cleaned and lubricated again after the grease collects dirt and dries out. But works great for the price. There are units with sealed bearings that slide easy, but way more expensive.
Their palpation cage is also very low cost and works pretty well.
 

Katpau

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I have one that hung on the top and another with a gate that slid down from the top when you pulled a rope. Both had disadvantages and we always also kept a selection of 4 inch round posts leaning along the alley. We found ourselves using them more than the expensive equipment. Both of those other stops are now stacked up against the wall in the weigh barn. The posts are all we use now and it seems that whenever we help out somewhere else, they also have a selection of posts to jam in the alley behind the cows and calves. They give the advantage of being put in multiple locations and at various heights and are cheap. You can use a sturdy tree branch if you want. You can even put a couple in behind an agile and active calf. Now if I were working alone those automatic stops would be great, but I never work alone anymore.
 

Caustic Burno

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What's your favorite type of anti-backup device in a cattle lane, and why? Pics and/or links would be great!

I've not actually used anything other than a rod across the alleyway, but have seen the ones that hang from the top... my concern with them is they really limit your ability to be able to follow the cattle into the lane if you need to, and they're not the right height for anything other than the tallest animals in the group. The ones that swing forward on the side, including just little rods from each side, can slow down the animals, thinking that their "lane" is being blocked, and... they can get on top of them sometimes. Either will allow an animal to get under/around them if they figure it out....

So I'm looking to see what everybody thinks is THEIR "best in show", and why.
I have worked cows by myself for decades this ended up being my better mousetrap.
It’s my third and final pen on this journey.
It’s got a swing backstop they duck under and two cut gates in the alley. One back into the pen and the other into a rat trap that opens to two different pastures and a lot.
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sstterry

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I have worked cows by myself for decades this ended up being my better mousetrap.
It’s my third and final pen on this journey.
It’s got a swing backstop they duck under and two cut gates in the alley. One back into the pen and the other into a rat trap that opens to two different pastures and a lot.
View attachment 16881View attachment 16880
Is that an automatic headgate?
 

BFE

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Don’t know that it’s my favorite but my alley has pipe backstops. It was built by a local gentleman so nothing fancy but it works.
 

TCRanch

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The reason I ask is, how difficult is it to get them in the headgate by yourself if you have a stubborn one?
Take your time and let them decide - they'll eventually go without twisting their tail, prodding, slapping, yelling. Sometimes I'll put a bowl of cubes just outside the headgate as bait. Same thing when I'm trying to load a stubborn one. If you work with them on their terms, slower is generally faster & easier.
 

sstterry

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Take your time and let them decide - they'll eventually go without twisting their tail, prodding, slapping, yelling. Sometimes I'll put a bowl of cubes just outside the headgate as bait. Same thing when I'm trying to load a stubborn one. If you work with them on their terms, slower is generally faster & easier.
I never yell or get mine excited. They are used to me and most of the time a little gentle prodding gets them to go where I want.
 

TCRanch

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I never yell or get mine excited. They are used to me and most of the time a little gentle prodding gets them to go where I want.
Yup! And know your cattle. When I was loading the bulls, I know that all I have to do with Woody is to slowly apply pressure from behind while he's in the corral and he'll go into the trap, down the alley & into the trailer - with me still behind, but with an escape route (which would be scaling the panels). Willy, on the other hand, has to think it's all his idea. I'll open the gate to the trap and just stand in the corral until he decides he's going in, and he'll go all the way on his own volition.
 

Nesikep

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Take your time and let them decide - they'll eventually go without twisting their tail, prodding, slapping, yelling. Sometimes I'll put a bowl of cubes just outside the headgate as bait. Same thing when I'm trying to load a stubborn one. If you work with them on their terms, slower is generally faster & easier.

When I had to load Hector out, he didn't really trust going into the trailer, he was totally calm though... What convinced him was a few squirts of fly spray.. they hate spritzy sprays!
20190819 101919
 

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