Expected extreme heat wave temperatures

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Nesikep

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We've got similar winters and get that hot occasionally. I hate dugouts but the cows sure appreciate them in those temps. They'll just wade right in. Last year I had a cow laying in a 2 foot puddle one hot day because they were being watered from a trough and no dugout available. At first I thought something was wrong but no, she was just cooling off a bit. They'll survive but they won't like it.
My cows HATE water.. they will not walk under a sprinkler!
 

Katpau

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I heard it might even be hotter further north of us, which is very different. We will see. I'm hoping the reports are wrong. They predicted days of rain that never arrived here earlier in June and then we later ended up getting 1/2 inch on a day that had only a 6% probability of any rain.

I moved to Roseburg from central Minnesota almost 30 years ago, mostly for the weather. I really liked the fact that extremely hot temperatures were rare and humidity was low. We still have low humidity, but those 100 degree days seem to come a little more often every year. I can't remember there being more than a few days that hit 100 in the first 10-15 years we lived here. I was just looking at data from NOAA today, and I see our 30 year average high temps for June to August are .7 to 1.5 degrees warmer than they were 10 years ago. Total 30 year average rainfall has dropped by 4 inches. The average annual rainfall was 36.26 inches measured between 1981 through 2010. From 1991 to 2020 it dropped to 32.07 inches. I'm afraid Roseburg will look more like Medford in another 30 years. We have lost a lot of big fir trees to the drought and heat over the last few years.
 

Rydero

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With all that money yall make by not having "eared" cattle yall haven't put climate controlled barns in yet? šŸ¤£

Consider it natural selection. The herd will be stronger on the back side.
Send me some to winter for you and the ones that survive will look like Shrek when they get back.
 

Nesikep

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I heard it might even be hotter further north of us, which is very different. We will see. I'm hoping the reports are wrong. They predicted days of rain that never arrived here earlier in June and then we later ended up getting 1/2 inch on a day that had only a 6% probability of any rain.

I moved to Roseburg from central Minnesota almost 30 years ago, mostly for the weather. I really liked the fact that extremely hot temperatures were rare and humidity was low. We still have low humidity, but those 100 degree days seem to come a little more often every year. I can't remember there being more than a few days that hit 100 in the first 10-15 years we lived here. I was just looking at data from NOAA today, and I see our 30 year average high temps for June to August are .7 to 1.5 degrees warmer than they were 10 years ago. Total 30 year average rainfall has dropped by 4 inches. The average annual rainfall was 36.26 inches measured between 1981 through 2010. From 1991 to 2020 it dropped to 32.07 inches. I'm afraid Roseburg will look more like Medford in another 30 years. We have lost a lot of big fir trees to the drought and heat over the last few years.
We haven't had any significant rain since we thawed out, typical precipitation here is 17"/year, some years has been 10-12".. About 10 years ago we had 100+* days from mid may through to September
Previous 2 years were pretty wet, we had a very wet, warm winter.. Fir tree's really sprouted up everywhere and maybe had a chance to get established, we had a lot of beetle kill here
 

Katpau

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I had no idea it was that dry where you are Nesi. I've googled the area and I just assumed since you are further North and similar distance from the coast that it was wetter, like Seattle. We get most of our rain from October through April. June through August are always very dry May and September can go either way, but lately they have been very dry also.
 

Brute 23

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Send me some to winter for you and the ones that survive will look like Shrek when they get back.
I'm not following you. If you sent me your cattle they would look the same... what is your point?

My point is there is a large strip that runs between you and I where they could, and probably should, rin a tick of ear, but dont, and love to bring up the difference in prices. When it gets warm or dry there is panic in the streets all the sudden.
 

alacowman1

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What's the hair coat look like on these northern cattle right now have they slicked off completely...
 

Rydero

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I'm not following you. If you sent me your cattle they would look the same... what is your point?

My point is there is a large strip that runs between you and I where they could, and probably should, rin a tick of ear, but dont, and love to bring up the difference in prices. When it gets warm or dry there is panic in the streets all the sudden.

A joke. Shrek's ears are pretty short, like a Brahman would look after it froze them off. You were talking pretty tough about barns and natural selection (also joking)
Just saying - my cattle might have a tough time with the heat (breeds I use are all used in the South though) but the only time I saw it seriously discussed having a climate controlled barn for beef cattle was in an article about Brahman cattle being raised in Alberta, lol.
 

Dave

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Our 10 day forecast has us going over 100 on Tuesday and staying there throught the 10 day. But our forecast is for Baker which is about 800 feet higher in elevation. We are always a couple degrees hotter. Weather underground says it is 91 in Baker right now. It shows at 95 or 96 on my back porch. For my cows to find shade they have to lay under a sage brush and they might have to walk a mile or so to find water. They will be fine. Nothing they haven't experienced before. Just early this year and extended time line. Our average high and low for the month of July is 87 and 59.
 

ccr

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Our 10 day forecast has us going to be cooler than the normal of 91Ā°. Our highs to be in the mid 80Ā°s. Which is about 30Ā° cooler than our record high for June.

2021-06-24 weather.JPG


Our record high in June is 113Ā° back in 1980.

National Weather Servicenws data.JPG
 

Katpau

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I keep reminding myself that in Red Bluff CA 250 miles south of us, they see these temperatures often and you don't see cattle with ear in that area either. I think the cattle will be fine. I feel like I'm better off than many because my pastures have more shaded areas than open. I expect I won't see much of them for the next few days. They have favorite spots where the breeze sucks its way through narrow spots in the valleys and they will probably use those. i love those spots too. It is kind of like natures air conditioning.
 

Katpau

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Question for those of you from places in the south where 100+ degree days are a common occurrence. Do you calve in that weather, and if so do you lose calves to the heat? I'm not sure if I should be worried. Normally we keep interference with the birth and bonding process to a minimum, but I am wondering if the calf should be cooled off somehow if born midday.

Over 40 years ago I lost a newborn filly that was born on an extremely hot day in Minnesota. It was over 100 out and humid. It had not cooled off much overnight. We first found it early in the morning with the mom standing over it and we brought it in to try to cool it off. We were not able to save it. I never knew if it died just of heat stress or if there was a difficult birth or other complications. I keep thinking about this as I wait for cow #3030 to calve. At least here it almost always cools off at night.
 

Dave

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Our advantage over those southern areas is we will cool off at night and we don't have the high humidity. Our highs next week will be over 100 but the night time temperature will be around 60 and the day time humidity will be in the teens. 100 degrees with a 15% humidity is a whole lot cooler than 100 degrees with 90% humidity.
 

Nesikep

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What's the hair coat look like on these northern cattle right now have they slicked off completely...
I have a couple first-timers that haven't completely slicked off yet, but most have been totally slick for 2 months... My bull calves have just finished shedding out their baby fur, they're a lot darker now

Nice slick lard-arse
20210620_104428.jpg
This is her daughter that's still a little scruffy around the edges, wish I could give her some of the condition her mother has
20210620_104830.jpg
I had no idea it was that dry where you are Nesi. I've googled the area and I just assumed since you are further North and similar distance from the coast that it was wetter, like Seattle. We get most of our rain from October through April. June through August are always very dry May and September can go either way, but lately they have been very dry also.
We're on the dry side of the coast mountains, and we have a particularly tall peak to our west that divides the clouds.. the town gets MUCH more rain than we do through the lake corridor. If we're going to get a significant rain, it's usually from an easterly wind from the cascades, then the mountain to our west makes the humidity pile up against it and we'll get a good soaker for a couple days
 

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