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Jake

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How many generations have all of your families been farming/ ranching? I'll be a 5th or 6th generations farmer/ rancher.
 

Rustler9

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As far back as anybody in my family can remember. Probably since my white ancestors came over on the boat and since my Cherokee ancestors learned farming ways from the Europeans. Anyway, I would say we've been farming for several generations.
 

Cattle Rack Rancher

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On my mothers side, I think we have been farmers since they came over on the Mayflower. Ironically, several generations back my great-grandfather left the family business which eventually became a part of Kimberly Clark to go farming because it was less stressful. Some days, I question his intelligence.
 

Beefy

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i am a 4th generation farmer/rancher. I am talking about how long we've had and held on to our farm. the family has been farming ever since they hitched a boat over here.
 

frenchie

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Took me awhile to fiqure this out. had to get the old family bible out .....6 or 7 generations farming/ ranching.
 

Craig-TX

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Depends on which fork of the tree. Some (most?) of mine have been in farming and livestock since the old country, which ranges from 1600s to 1800s. Who knows beyond that? As we go back over the generations and the forking options increase exponentially we can all claim some great names. But, on the flip side of the coin, I’m sure we’ve all got our share horse thieves that we simply choose to ignore. Ha.

Craig-TX
 

Campground Cattle

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Craig-TX":nsxnotz3 said:
Depends on which fork of the tree. Some (most?) of mine have been in farming and livestock since the old country, which ranges from 1600s to 1800s. Who knows beyond that? As we go back over the generations and the forking options increase exponentially we can all claim some great names. But, on the flip side of the coin, I’m sure we’ve all got our share horse thieves that we simply choose to ignore. Ha.

Craig-TX

Original Family farm in Maryland in the 1600's still there, migrated South until coming to Texas as a republic. Most were Clergy/Teachers and Farmers.
Who knows before that.
 

cattle_gal

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To be simple and not blatant I'll just say that 2 brothers (or cousins) came in 1635 from England and were in farming and later cattle and sheep. I don't know off hand what the family occupations were pre America.
 

Linda

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My great grandfather on my mother's side farmed and raised purebred shorthorns in Missouri and Oklahoma. My grandmother left Oklahoma during the depression and dust bowl days, but her generation stayed in agriculture for many years. Her family was originally from Scotland.

My grandfather on my adopted dad's side was a sharecropper in Texas and his family originally came from Ireland. Farming then skipped a generation or two, until I managed to escape the city 25 years ago and started raising cattle in Montana and Utah.

My bio dad's family came from Holland to Pennsylvania, and followed the same basic migratory track as many others in my family. Tennesse, Arkansas, Texas, then to California during WWII. My grandfather was a stonemason. I don't see any farmers on that side of the family.

Looking back over the generations, our family had many, many cousins, uncles & aunts who either raised cattle, worked for ranches, or farmed their own land. Ours was a poor, migratory family, mostly following the great cattle drives, and/or homesteading land. My great grandfather left Tennessee and homesteaded Indian land in Missouri, then left there and, along with his brothers-in-law, homesteaded in the Indian Territory in Oklahoma. His brother-in-law went to work for the XIT Ranch in Texas as a cook for the cattle drives from Texas to Montana. He eventually "bought out an old trapper's claim" in northeastern Montana and settled there.
 

D.R. Cattle

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Mothers side before the American Revolution-settled in Wild West Virginia. Farmed just about whatever they needed to survive. Dad's side Florida crackers since the late 1800's, but citrus farmers, not beef.
 

J Baxter

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I've laid eyes on five generations farming. You can trace it all the way back to my great ^ 2500 grandad bubba fintstone who had a herd of registered brontosaurus and used a pair of tyranasaurus for draft to plant wheat.

JB
 

kjerckie

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I come from city folks. Parents complain about the smell. They say I am not normal and that there is something 'wrong' with a woman who wants to "watch that." I never had kids .... so I guess the ranching begins and ends with me :roll: I love it and I like the smell :D
 

CattleAnnie

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Skipped a generation with Dad (he was an educator until retirement a few years back), but even then he kept a herd of registered Simmentals. He immigrated to Canada as a youth, and his family had been farming in the old country as far back as anyone can record.

Guess it's been bred in us too deeply, 'cause even though the pay is terrible, I can't see myself doing anything else that I'd love as much. You can wash off the dirt, but the land's still in our blood.

Take care.
 

dun

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I'm still trying to figure out where it came from. Had an uncle that I never really knew that dairied in WI. Parents when I was a kid did the Robinsons "Have more plan" deal, goats, pigs, chickens, rabbgits, turkeys, etc. No cattle.
When I was little I told everyone I wanted to be a farmer and they thought I was nuts. They still think I am.
Daughter has no interest in it, grandkids think it's neat to visit, but it's too "messy". So I guess it will end with us in a couple of years.

dun
 

certherfbeef

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I'm the 5th generation But am told that I am a tratior. I strayed from the Holstein Dairy farm, went to college (now I am an educated idiot according to Grandpa) and run herefords and commercial cattle. My other half's farm has been in his family since 1880 or so but it was just a hobby thing.
Dad was not pleased when I decided to farm, matter of fact he was down right mad at me. But it is in my blood, I know nothing else. I love it.
The farm is the best place to raise a family in my opinion
 

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