Down Calf - Need Advice

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Anonymous

About 2 months ago I bought three holstien calves. They were about 200-250 lbs. I took them immediately to the vet and had them shot with micotil/micogent and vaccinated for black leg. I also poured them with Ivomec. Also had them castorated.

Two weeks ago I found one of them dead. Thought it might be from lightening, judging from where I found him. However, last Wednesday I observed another one walking somewhat slowly. Yesterday I found him in the barn, not able to get up. This afternoon, Sunday, I gave him a package of One-Day Response and three Terraycin tablets. Tonight I gave him some sweet feed and fresh water.

If he lives through the night, and he probably will, should I try to hoist him up on his feet? If so, how long do I leave him up and how much weight do I allow him to put on his feet?

Thanking you in advance for any help and further suggestions and advice.

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OP
A

Anonymous

Well, I'd recommend an exam. It sounds like white muscle disease, which is a vitamin E but mostly Selenium deficiency. It can cause sudden death, stiffness and downers. I've nursed the odd downer back up (one was flat out and eventually was able to walk....in a few weeks) but most will die. A simple blood test can tell you if that is the problem. In our area, it's an indirect test (glutathion peroxidase) but in many areas it's a direct selenium test. (Here all animals are considered deficient unless proven otherwise.....) There are a few other diseases to consider also, so talk with your vet! Good Luck! V
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> Well, I'd recommend an exam. It
> sounds like white muscle disease,
> which is a vitamin E but mostly
> Selenium deficiency. It can cause
> sudden death, stiffness and
> downers. I've nursed the odd
> downer back up (one was flat out
> and eventually was able to
> walk....in a few weeks) but most
> will die. A simple blood test can
> tell you if that is the problem.
> In our area, it's an indirect test
> (glutathion peroxidase) but in
> many areas it's a direct selenium
> test. (Here all animals are
> considered deficient unless proven
> otherwise.....) There are a few
> other diseases to consider also,
> so talk with your vet! Good Luck!
> V

Thanks Vicki - but I was too late. I had to put him down today.

I appreciate reading your advice, as well as everybody else's and slowly but surely I'm learning.

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