Down. And out!

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Been following this with optimism she would begin to recover soon. Any good news?
I wish. Showed the "dog sitting" pic to my vet yesterday and the cringe on her face spoke volumes, even before she said that's not good. But if she still has the will to fight and live, I'll fight right along with her. Within reason. I'm up for hauling water, cubes, hay and scooping out poop at least 3 times a day for now but at some point, logic will kick in and I'll know what to do. Or she'll shock the hell outta me and get up!
 
I wish. Showed the "dog sitting" pic to my vet yesterday and the cringe on her face spoke volumes, even before she said that's not good. But if she still has the will to fight and live, I'll fight right along with her. Within reason. I'm up for hauling water, cubes, hay and scooping out poop at least 3 times a day for now but at some point, logic will kick in and I'll know what to do. Or she'll shock the hell outta me and get up!
How many days til ya can make burger?

Dangit. I hate to hear it.
 
Everyone wants to lift them up. We have had far more luck taking them feed and water and letting them tell us when it is time to stand. A couple took 3 weeks and a couple more never did. Lifting the ones we did sure didn't speed up the progress.
I remember driving up and looking down into the canyon to see if a down cow had gotten up and her not being there. She had got up and walked out and was on the other side standing there.
 
No burger. Without her standing (that I know of), getting her out will be in the bucket of the track loader and subsequently to the "graveyard".
I've had an old reefer that the guts are torn out of on the farm for just such an occasion. Make her into pieces and cool her in the old fridge, and then grind her up and package her. At $3.50 a pound for burger I wouldn't put her in the bone yard.
 
We had a 1st calver down for six weeks plus one day. She got up…we were so used to walking through the barn we walked right past her, paused and turned back to see her standing. We could not believe it when she finally was standing there. She wore hobbles for another three weeks. It was winter. She wore hobbles right after calving. She too sat like a dog before she actually got up. Every time my husband went to put her down she would beg him not to…with her look, with a struggle to get up. He could not. Vet told us she was a "no go"…she proved everyone wrong. She just had her fourth calf. Not saying this is for everyone. It took a lot of work…bedding her, mucking her pen, packing water, forking feed and rolling her at times 3-4 times a day until she could do it herself. It was winter she was in our barn. But she made it! Good luck @TCRanch 😊
 
Only other down cow I had from a breeding injury was probably 12 years ago and it didn't turn out well. We did lift her, and I regret that. I did have first calf heifer down for about 3 days but all I did was supportive therapy.

Even with shade from the tarps and another dose of Banamine yesterday, she wasn't looking good and had a raging 106.3 temp. I fully expected to find her dead this morning and looked for buzzards on my way out. But I'll be darned, she's looking and acting downright perky and moved around quite a bit last night (based on the piles of poo I cleaned up). I dunno what to expect but I'll continue to check her, bring her water every few hours (during the day - I need my sleep!).View attachment 45627
She does look perky and having their head up and ears tight is a good sign.
 
As long as she is looking "perky", eats and drinks good, and you are willing to put the effort into her, I see no reason to "count her out"... When she quits making an effort, that is when it is time to do something.
We have lifted them before, and I think the hip lifts do little to help with the way they pick them up and put more pressure on the muscles/ligs as they lift. Besides most beef animals are too "fat" to use them on and they slip off the hips. We did lift one with a canvas sling we made one time... left it under her when we let her back down... and she eventually could stand by herself and then she got hobbles to keep her from splitting.
No good answer, time will make the decision for you and for her...
 
It was time to end it. She hadn't moved from where she was yesterday afternoon and only nibbled at her cubes, didn't touch the brome. Still perky when I was with her but clearly not good. Honestly, I'm relieved. She was a great cow that's given me 8 calves and earned the right to be buried on this ranch.
 
It was time to end it. She hadn't moved from where she was yesterday afternoon and only nibbled at her cubes, didn't touch the brome. Still perky when I was with her but clearly not good. Honestly, I'm relieved. She was a great cow that's given me 8 calves and earned the right to be buried on this ranch.

That's the bad part of having livestock and it never gets easier.

You did all you could for her!
 
Hate to hear it, but sometimes that's how things go. You did the best anyone could do but this time, recovery just wasn't in the cards. Comes with the territory I guess, the good with the bad.

Had one myself, that got stuck in cold cold mud in freezing 15-20F temperatures, we got it pulled out and fed it and tried to keep it warm that night and eventually got up on it's own a few days but once it layed back down, wouldn't be able to get back up. It too, ended up on the bone pile. I was kinda used to that kindof thing, but it really hurt my wife as we sat out there all night long keeping that fire going, tho I don't know that it really did the bull any good.

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