• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Do you think they froze?

TB-Herefords

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 10, 2007
Messages
223
Reaction score
0
Location
Montana




What do you think? Have another cow that has one teat that is all black but not normally black.
 

Ned Jr.

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2006
Messages
628
Reaction score
1
Location
Colorado
They look froze to me. I had that happen to one of mine before and she ended up losing the tips that turned black. She healed up fine and just had shorter teats but when she calved the milk ran out of them. Your cows teats don't look as solid black as mine did yet so they may heal.
 

milkmaid

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2004
Messages
5,295
Reaction score
0
Location
Idaho
That's really bad frostbite. Yowch. They look like dry cows? If they're dry cows with a few months to calving they may be okay, if they're lactating they'll probably lose all affected quarters to mastitis. You ought to consider changing your winter managment (ie bedding/shelter area) since I've only rarely seen frostbitten teats on mature cows, and it gets down to -20'F here not including windchill. Most of the time I see frostbite on fresh heifers; when it's mature cows they're always heavy milking, currently lactating cows.

Nice pics though, I'm adding them to my problems folder. :p ;-)
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
15,973
Reaction score
46
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
yep, that's frozen alright... tell your cat to tuck his ears back too, well, that goes for cattle too..

invest in woollen braziers for the cows, as well as toques!

must be darned cold there!
 

ollie?

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2007
Messages
404
Reaction score
0
I just unbuttoned my shirt and mine look the same way after feeding hay tonight...brrrrrr.
 

Bez+

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 28, 2007
Messages
1,011
Reaction score
0
Location
Still trying to get back to even.
ollie?":20x6e7yg said:
I just unbuttoned my shirt and mine look the same way after feeding hay tonight...brrrrrr.

A visual thought I could certainly have done without this fine morning. :shock:

Merry Christmas to you and your wonderful family.

Bez+
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
That is one of the primary reasons we don;t want calves nursing in the winter.
 

mnmtranching

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
5,061
Reaction score
0
Location
MN
Frozen, bad case. I don't know why, but I haven't a problem with the cows freezing teats. Mine all Winter outside with only windbreaks. My brother down the road had a couple cases last Winter. He saved the cows and they finally healed up, calved. The problem was, milk ran out, calves didn't grow and he was forced to sell the cows. His were dry cows to, I think lactating cows have much more blood flow down there.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
Friend of mine at a dairy ran out of his winter teat dip so decided to use the regular stuff for just one milking. H ended up losing around a dozen cows to frozen teats. Now at the dairy even when we use the winter stuff we hold the cows in the barn long enough for the dip to pretty much dry before turning them out. 20 degrees or so isn;t a real problem but it's 20 with winds to match or much colder and we have problems.
 

milkmaid

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2004
Messages
5,295
Reaction score
0
Location
Idaho
dun":2x493gao said:
Friend of mine at a dairy ran out of his winter teat dip so decided to use the regular stuff for just one milking. H ended up losing around a dozen cows to frozen teats. Now at the dairy even when we use the winter stuff we hold the cows in the barn long enough for the dip to pretty much dry before turning them out. 20 degrees or so isn;t a real problem but it's 20 with winds to match or much colder and we have problems.

How much time does that add to milking by holding cows until the dip dries?

My boss has a winter teat dip he uses down to around 0'F, then a powdered teat dip for down to -20'F. Been working pretty good so far.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
milkmaid":1cxuzagg said:
dun":1cxuzagg said:
Friend of mine at a dairy ran out of his winter teat dip so decided to use the regular stuff for just one milking. H ended up losing around a dozen cows to frozen teats. Now at the dairy even when we use the winter stuff we hold the cows in the barn long enough for the dip to pretty much dry before turning them out. 20 degrees or so isn;t a real problem but it's 20 with winds to match or much colder and we have problems.

How much time does that add to milking by holding cows until the dip dries?

My boss has a winter teat dip he uses down to around 0'F, then a powdered teat dip for down to -20'F. Been working pretty good so far.

Only adds about 5 minutes or so for each parlor full. The glycerin in the stuff sets up really quickly
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
15,973
Reaction score
46
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
My cousins in Westlock had problems with their dairy herd as well, though I think with some of the extreme cold they got there, the cows were just kept inside,... they said they've seen -53C, which is roughly -65-70F... I'd hate to have to try and water that many dairy cows in that weather

I guess there's something to be said for itty bitty titties :roll:
 

hillsdown

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2006
Messages
9,925
Reaction score
0
Location
Alberta, Canada
That definitely does not look good. What are you using for protection against wind for your cows. It looks like they are going to need bedding and shelters to stop their teats from freezing.

You might want to put a call into your vet to see what you can do to save those teats. I have only seen it once and that was with a heifer with very bad edema the week before she calved, did all I could to save it but lost that quarter .She actually had a hole in her rear quarter from where it froze. It was bad but she is still here/bred back and has plenty of milk with three quarters ,she never did develop mastitis.
 

TB-Herefords

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 10, 2007
Messages
223
Reaction score
0
Location
Montana
Well they have really good wind breaks in the coralls. They've been in the coralls for about two three weeks now. I havn't put any down any straw because this is the first time I've has issues with this. But of course a little straw never hurt and in this situation might have prevented. Tough lesson learned. Will have to see how she bags up. She is due around the end of January. She has a small tight bag when she is full; but longer teats. One way to cull for smaller teats. :roll:
 

DOC HARRIS

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 26, 2005
Messages
3,256
Reaction score
0
Location
Ft. Collins, CO
Give this some thought. If you haven't laid down bedding in three weeks in sub zero weather ( :!: ) in an outdoor lot with multiple cows milling around and lying down in wet urine and manure - the teats freeze, AND freeze TO the mud and manure, and therefore you can expect epidermal tissue (skin) to freeze - absolutely. Bedding (grain straw or corn stalk straw) provides not only a drying factor to the urine and mud and manure, but an insulating factor to help prevent the teats from freezing. As you know, cattle can tolerate a lot of cold IF they can keep dry and out of the wind!

DOC HARRIS
 

I luv herfrds

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2007
Messages
5,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Montana
Good point Doc.
Husband and I rolled 2 round bales of straw into the corrals holding our bulls and the replacement calves.
Normally could just back in with the feed truck, but a drift is in the way. They were light enough we could roll them by hand.
Very happy stock.
 

bigbull338

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2005
Messages
16,565
Reaction score
0
Location
texas
all the pics have frozen teats in them.an by the looks an color of the teats.they will prolly fall off.an end up being 2 teated cows.but most likely they need tobe culled.
 

TB-Herefords

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 10, 2007
Messages
223
Reaction score
0
Location
Montana
Aint no mud in these corrals. Most the urin is froze on the way out; and the cow pies are like rocks. Just too much wind chill. But; Your most definitely right about the straw.
 
Top