Do you call it Hay?

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Bright Raven

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Fire Sweep and I have a difference in "what is hay?"

During a conversation today, I stated "my hay is thick". She corrected me that my grass may be thick but unless it is cut, "it is not hay".

In the part of the world I grew up in, a farmer looks at his hayfield and tells his neighbor, "tomorrow I am going to mow my hay."

In California where Kris grew up, a farmer looks at his hayfield and tells his neighbor, "tomorrow I am going to mow my grass."

She and I decided to take this serious difference to the users of Cattle Today.

Please. Is it correct to refer to it as hay before it is cut and drying on the ground?
 
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Bright Raven

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TennesseeTuxedo":3kmw2d8c said:
I notice it didn't bother her enough to start a thread.

It's a field of tall grass that will become hay.

I call it a "hay field" because that's what it produces but I see your point.

On the contrary. It bothered her enough that she kept telling me to not say hay. Lol
 

M-5

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Simple, If its green its grass if its dry or drying its HAY . Now I fertilized the grass in my hay field last week. When I cut the hay field it is grass until its layed down then it become hay , so Cutting Hay is proper
 

Rafter S

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It's grass (or alfalfa, etc) while it's standing. After it's cut and cured it's hay. Firesweep is right and you're wrong. I'm sorry to have to break it to you.
 
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Bright Raven

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I am not conceding until Bigfoot has a say.

Never heard a farmer in my life not refer to it as hay whether standing or down.
 

TexasBred

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Bright Raven":27cvnnpq said:
I am not conceding until Bigfoot has a say.

Never heard a farmer in my life not refer to it as hay whether standing or down.
Not me....if it's standing and growing it's grass.
 

callmefence

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TennesseeTuxedo":2tzka2c4 said:
callmefence":2tzka2c4 said:
So at the same time as the simmangus and Brahman dustups , you been arguing about grass or hay. ?

In all due respect it was more of an Angus and Brahman dust up.

Everybody knows Simmental's are a niche breed for hobby guys. :D


I stand corrected.
I hope you realize how many hogs, squirrels and other small animals are going to pay for the things you said.
 
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Bright Raven

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Kentucky is known for colloquialisms. This is one of them. Grass and clover intended for hay is called HAY. I ain't changin after 66 years.
 

Nesikep

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It would be a mistake to call a legume "grass"...
I also say "I am going to cut hay when the weather clears up".. If it's a pasture field I don't intend on cutting for hay, I call it grass (usually because there's not much alfalfa left)
 
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Bright Raven

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Nesikep":2prgm0w6 said:
It would be a mistake to call a legume "grass"...
I also say "I am going to cut hay when the weather clears up".. If it's a pasture field I don't intend on cutting for hay, I call it grass (usually because there's not much alfalfa left)

Raven: How is your hay this spring? Oh, I mean how is your legume this spring.

Nesikep: You mean my hay, Raven.

Raven: No, dammit, I mean your legume.

Nesikep: My legume in my pasture or in my hay field?

Raven: Ah, forget it. How is your grass this spring?

Nesikep: In my hay field or in my pasture?

Raven: Let's go have beer.
 

Rafter S

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It is perfectly acceptable to say "I'm going to cut hay tomorrow." It is wrong, on the other hand, to point to green grass that's growing and refer to it as hay. And this is coming from someone that spent a good chunk of his life in a hay field.
 

wbvs58

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And just to throw another term into the works people here will say that their grass is starting to "hay off" when it gets long and dries out with no intention of ever cutting it for hay.

I think you should just go kiss and make up with Firesweep Ron.

Ken
 

Rafter S

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I finally thought of a good analogy. Calling green growing grass "hay" is like calling a mixture of ground or finally cut beef (or venison), peppers, onions, garlic, tomatoes, and spices "chili" if you put beans in it. It's just wrong.
 
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Bright Raven

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Rafter S":3bsg5leq said:
It is perfectly acceptable to say "I'm going to cut hay tomorrow." It is wrong, on the other hand, to point to green grass that's growing and refer to it as hay. And this is coming from someone that spent a good chunk of his life in a hay field.

I agree that is the "proper" use. But it is common in Kentucky and particularly among the farmers I grew up around to hear them refer to the grasses, clovers, etc. that grows in their hay field as "hay".

In example, Johnny Workman was just here this evening. I called him this morning to find out if he would harvest my hay crop. He pulled up. We said hello and he stated, "Let's go look at your hay."

He didn't say, "Let's go look at your grass".

As I said, this my be a Kentucky colloquialism. But it is not just me. Everyone around here refers to the grasses and clovers in their hay field as HAY.
 

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