Disposition of Ten-X sons?

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tom4018

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Wondering what others think of the disposition of his sons? Bought one a couple years ago and his attitude is getting worse.
 

kilroy60

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I've had one for three years now and he's as calm now as he was when we first got him.
 
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tom4018

tom4018

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TennesseeTuxedo":7t2n80it said:
What's he doing?

He just likes challenge you, head down and pawing the ground trying to charge you. Last night he got in the hay lot as I was feeding hay and about got me. I have a hot wire around the lot and after I got him out he jumped the gate as I was putting it back up, he has been getting worse lately about coming after people.
 

ClinchValley

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Might just be me, but every time I am in the vicinity of a bull I keep my attention toward them. Just like a dog, i'm sure the calmest bull can snap. With the role we play, i would think they see us as a challenger often times.


That said, i don't think i could allow a bull to stay after what you described. Guys/gals are killed all the time by their livestock. Life's too short.

Family friend had his back, quite a few ribs, and a leg broken by his bull last year. Luckily he was able to roll/be pushed underneath a piece of equipment. Or it would have killed him.

Life is just too darn precious and short.

Plus, they are just too big and strong to have to worry about fighting with them.
 

TennesseeTuxedo

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tom4018":2o8m3vzu said:
TennesseeTuxedo":2o8m3vzu said:
What's he doing?

He just likes challenge you, head down and pawing the ground trying to charge you. Last night he got in the hay lot as I was feeding hay and about got me. I have a hot wire around the lot and after I got him out he jumped the gate as I was putting it back up, he has been getting worse lately about coming after people.

Not good. Might be time for him to go. Do his calves act the same?
 

TCRanch

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Trailer time. I wouldn't have a bull with attitude in the first place. If it's getting worse, you're putting yourself & others in danger.
 

NonTypicalCPA

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After that, I'd call the processor and have him meet me at the farm, then go out and have the pleasure of putting one between his eyes.
 

J&D Cattle

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We have two grandsons and they are both very calm. I've been around their Dad as well at the breeders farm and he's a puppy.
 

SchenkAngusFarm

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I have a Ten X son and do not have any problems and am planning on selling him pretty soon. I've had a couple before him too and never had any problems.
 

wbvs58

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I think he should go as well. With handling bulls I do not take any nonsense from them but as they mature i will not put myself into a direct confrontation with them as in head on, I leave that to my dog Jed to do, he will bite them on the nose and grab hold of their cheek and turn them back very effectively and once turned I will come in and drive them along with his help. If you challenge them head on and you lose, you have lost your power over them for ever, best to avoid that direct confrontation. When I am working my bulls my dog Jed will be lying in the adjacent yard and they know he is there and they toe the line, Jed is quick to move if any of them give any $hit.

Ken
 
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tom4018

tom4018

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TennesseeTuxedo":sywkmtme said:
tom4018":sywkmtme said:
TennesseeTuxedo":sywkmtme said:
What's he doing?

He just likes challenge you, head down and pawing the ground trying to charge you. Last night he got in the hay lot as I was feeding hay and about got me. I have a hot wire around the lot and after I got him out he jumped the gate as I was putting it back up, he has been getting worse lately about coming after people.


Not good. Might be time for him to go. Do his calves act the same?

Overall they seem ok.
 

TCRanch

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Tom, I've kept calves out of a bull that was immediately sold after he tried to take out my husband and they've turned out great. Two are on their 2nd calf, 1 is a 1st calf heifer. One is even named Sweetie Pie. But I also sold more than I kept; retain judiciously.
 

TennesseeTuxedo

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wbvs58":fb2drxkt said:
I think he should go as well. With handling bulls I do not take any nonsense from them but as they mature i will not put myself into a direct confrontation with them as in head on, I leave that to my dog Jed to do, he will bite them on the nose and grab hold of their cheek and turn them back very effectively and once turned I will come in and drive them along with his help. If you challenge them head on and you lose, you have lost your power over them for ever, best to avoid that direct confrontation. When I am working my bulls my dog Jed will be lying in the adjacent yard and they know he is there and they toe the line, Jed is quick to move if any of them give any $hit.

Ken

Tom needs a "Jed".
 

Ebenezer

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Did you ever suspect the problems from the dam side? I've noticed that disposition can skip generations and the dam can reintroduce the foolishness as well as the bull.
 

TennesseeTuxedo

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Ebenezer":1j9bfxv4 said:
Did you ever suspect the problems from the dam side? I've noticed that disposition can skip generations and the dam can reintroduce the foolishness as well as the bull.

Excellent point. That explains why 95% of our calves are cool as cucumbers but there are some that are well let's just say, challenging.
 

Coosh71

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Sorry to hear that about your bull, but let me be an echo also... We do not have a cow, bull, horse, dog or a rooster that is a problem animal. Too busy to put up with it. There are those out there that like a "rodeo" every time they handle their cattle... Good for them, but not me. Had a good black Angus bull chase me out of a pasture 1 time... He's dog food. Had a great cow go nuts on me and pinned my leg against a pen wall as I was jumping over (I was down for 10 days), turned and chunked my wife over a gate. She's gone. Didn't take her to the sale took her to the processor. Good luck but act now before you get hurt.
 

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