Diesel Tank Filter

Help Support CattleToday:

Nowland Farms

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2005
Messages
1,211
Reaction score
0
Location
Heart of Dixie
I have recently purchased a new 100 gallon diesel tank and 12 volt pump to use to refuel the D31P dozer and the farm tractors. When installing the pump on the tank, I set it up to have a filter before the fuel enters the hose. I was undecided whether to use a water block filter or the standard fuel filter. I choose the water block filter because it is a 10 micron (as was the other one also) and that I was thinking the filter will stop the water and trash down to 10 microns Now I am having questions as to whether I made the right decision.

Here are the filters that I choose from -

- Goldenrod Water-Block Filter, 10-micron, model 596.

- Goldenrod Standard Fuel Filter, 10-micron, model 595.


The diesel tank will for the most part be under the shed in the barn. We will continue to buy fuel from the same place we have for years. Haven’t ever had problems with either trash or water in the 5 gallon cans we have used to keep everything filled.

What is the best filter to use?
 

jedstivers

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
5,787
Reaction score
1
Location
Marianna Arkansas (East Central)
We only use 10 micron with water shut down. Just keep extras on hand because you never know when just enough water will shut it down, but it's better to have in the filter than in the tank on the tractor.
 

cfpinz

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 8, 2005
Messages
6,214
Reaction score
241
Location
Virginia
I use the 596's, and definately keep some extras on hand as jed suggested. If you're using a hand pump, when it picks up water you can feel increased resistance on the pump and flow will drop. On an electric pump, you'll notice a decrease in flow. Whole lot easier to change that filter than get water/trash out of your tractor's fuel system.
 

tytower

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 12, 2005
Messages
511
Reaction score
0
Location
QLD AUSTRALIA
If this were me I would have it set up so the fuel tank has a bottom drain pipe into a large clear bowl so if you have any water it will appear there first because oil floats on water. Drain a pint or so before each use and if clear pour it back into one of your tanks ,fixed or tractor. If water is present you will see it come into the bowl and can continue draining until clear.

The bottom of the pipe through which fuel is drawn to the pump should have a u-bend at the bottom about 2¨ high. If you need the last 2 inches you can drain the tank as previous.

I would put the filter on the line just after the pump. Fuel is pushed through rather than sucked (technically its always pushed by air pressure entering the top of the tank so its much of a muchness to me .) I´d like to know what others think about this and why.
 

Angus Cowman

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2008
Messages
7,157
Reaction score
1
Location
the Great State of Mental Distress ( Florida)
tytower":2xbbkdpv said:
If this were me I would have it set up so the fuel tank has a bottom drain pipe into a large clear bowl so if you have any water it will appear there first because oil floats on water. Drain a pint or so before each use and if clear pour it back into one of your tanks ,fixed or tractor. If water is present you will see it come into the bowl and can continue draining until clear.

The bottom of the pipe through which fuel is drawn to the pump should have a u-bend at the bottom about 2¨ high. If you need the last 2 inches you can drain the tank as previous.

I would put the filter on the line just after the pump. Fuel is pushed through rather than sucked (technically its always pushed by air pressure entering the top of the tank so its much of a muchness to me .) I´d like to know what others think about this and why.
Kinda hard to do that on portable tanks
the filter is the best option
also keep the tank as full as possible to prevent sweating if the tank sits for awhile pump a gallon or 2 out into a jug and use it for burning brushpiles
 

Kingfisher

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Messages
5,195
Reaction score
1
Location
Austin Texas
"We will continue to buy fuel from the same place we have for years. Haven’t ever had problems with either trash or water in the 5 gallon cans we have used to keep everything filled."
Use what ever your supplier uses...........:)
 

tytower

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 12, 2005
Messages
511
Reaction score
0
Location
QLD AUSTRALIA
tytower":okl29p9a said:
If this were me I would have it set up so the fuel tank has a bottom drain pipe into a large clear bowl so if you have any water it will appear there first because oil floats on water.
Angus Cowman":okl29p9a said:
Kinda hard to do that on portable tanks
Seems to me ¨I have recently purchased a new 100 gallon diesel tank¨ is not very portable ,specially when full and it lives in the shed. ¨The diesel tank will for the most part be under the shed in the barn.¨

What would be hard about that? Even just the tank on an angle and a drain cock would suffice.
 

Angus Cowman

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2008
Messages
7,157
Reaction score
1
Location
the Great State of Mental Distress ( Florida)
tytower":2molio7k said:
Seems to me ¨I have recently purchased a new 100 gallon diesel tank¨ is not very portable ,specially when full and it lives in the shed. ¨The diesel tank will for the most part be under the shed in the barn.¨

What would be hard about that? Even just the tank on an angle and a drain cock would suffice.
Ty he never said it would be under a shed here in the states most guys who put 12volt pumps on tanks the tanks are either a rectangle tank or a L shaped tank that sits in the back of your truck and your fuel supply is portable so you can take fuel to the machine instead of the machine to the fuel
most stationary tanks that sit under sheds are from 300 to 1000 gal and they are usually gravity flow tanks
 
OP
Nowland Farms

Nowland Farms

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2005
Messages
1,211
Reaction score
0
Location
Heart of Dixie
The tank is a portable 100 gallon rectangle tank that I purchased from Tractor Supply Company. The tank is made by Delta. The tank is made to go in the back of the pickup. Since most of the time, this tank will be used on the farm, it will sit under the shed to protect it from rain. However, since we will be using the dozer to clean up 80 acres (that we are currently having logged) and ready for replanting, the tank will also spend some time in the back of the truck. Because I wanted a way to load and unload the tank out of the truck, I built a heavy duty pallet out of 4"x4"s, 5/4" boards and 2"x4"s. I bolted the tank down to the pallet. I will be able to use the forks on the FEL to load and unload from the truck. I could have used any old pallet but it would have prevented me from using the gooseneck hitch in the truck.

Regarding the comment of 100 gallon tank not being very portable, I found several 250 - 300 gallon tanks on Craigslist which were cheaper thank what I paid for this tank. The problem with them was the fact that they were too big for my needs and would take up the whole bed of the truck.
 

cfpinz

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 8, 2005
Messages
6,214
Reaction score
241
Location
Virginia
I had an old 100 gal L-shaped Delta steel tank for years, every time I filled it up I got nervous looking at the rust on the bottom of it. Drooled over those fancy aluminum diamondplate boxes for years, just couldn't justify the dough for one. Last fall I stopped by TSC after hearing they were having a sale on some things and walked by the fuel tank display just after they were marked down, long story short I wound up with a 100 gallon diamondplate L-tank for 250 bucks, had been 750. I just about peed myself.
 

SRBeef

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2007
Messages
2,931
Reaction score
1
Location
SW Wisconsin
I use a Baldwin filter on the outlet of my diesel pump. This filter has a small drain screw on the bottom. Once in awhile I loosen screw and drain some fuel and/or water from the bottom into a glass jar and discard if I see any water in it. Retighten screw. Done.

The supposed water catching filters give up filter area for water catching/holding area. I would rather have the filter area in a filter. The function of a filter is to act as a filter, not a water trap. My tractor has a separate water bowl and separate inlet filter. Having a 10 micron filter on the transfer pump outlet mostly helps keep the 3-5 micron engine filter working longer since the pump filter catches most of the larger particles.

Fine filters such as a 10 micron should ALWAYS be on the outlet/pressure side of a pump never on the inlet side or they may cause inlet restriction and cavitate the pump which is not good. Only think which should be on the inlet side of that type of pump is a screen to keep out the nuts and bolts. jmho.

Jim
 

upfrombottom

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 19, 2009
Messages
1,123
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Arkansas
I've got an L shaped steel Delta tank in my truck now, that I've had for years. It came with loops welded to the top so you can lift it out and I take it in and out with a come-a-long when I'm not haying. I have a filter on it after the pump. I also have a 250 gal gravity tank up on stilts I fill up with the portable so in the winter I have fuel at the house.

As I was baling the last of the first cutting this year, I filled the portable up and when I went to fuel the tractor, the pump wouldn't work, wouldn't even come on. I messed with it for about three hours and got PO ed and called my brother and got him to pick me up a new one. He brought the only one they had, which is a really good pump, but the dang thang wouldn't screw in the tank. The old one had a union type connector that would turn without turning the pump. The new pump was just threaded and you had to turn the whole pump around and around to thread it in the tank. Not so bad except you could only turn it a half turn and it hit the back glass of the truck. Wound up filling the tractor up by holding the pump with one hand and the hose with the other. And when I got home, I pumped what would fit in the 250 gal tank and every jug I could find just so I could pick it up and screw the pump in.

Well got the pump in and used it for a day and it quit pumping, again with a nearly full tank. It ran but wouldn't pump. Here we go again, only this time I had to syphon it out into jugs an what ever else I could find that wasn't already full. Picked the tank back up screwed the pump out and the dedgum pickup tube that came with the pump had came apart where they had glued it together, had glue on about a third of the pipe where it went in the fitting, I just left it in the tank and went to the store and got another pipe. I had to buy a whole stick for twenty inches, got it back together and so far, no more trouble. Figured the bottom would fall out of the price on diesel since I got it stockpiled now.
 
Top