Dealing with net wrap in winter

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sstterry

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I've also rolled them in the pasture with the loader till the ice was broken up but that don't always work.
Here's one thawing in the garage overnight, nothing beats a covered bale though.
A question I have always had, how do you get in the Skid Steer with a bale on the front?
 

TCRanch

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A question I have always had, how do you get in the Skid Steer with a bale on the front?
You get in the skid steer (or, track loader here), spear the bale and have your wife do the dirty work. Or - you have your wife do it all and she's freakishly agile.;):) That said, our current track loader is a Kubota and the door slides up-n-over, doesn't open out, so there's enough room.
 

sstterry

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You get in the skid steer (or, track loader here), spear the bale and have your wife do the dirty work. Or - you have your wife do it all and she's freakishly agile.;):) That said, our current track loader is a Kubota and the door slides up-n-over, doesn't open out, so there's enough room.
We all are not blessed with a " freakishly agile" wife 😓 or a newer Kubota where the doors slide up. For the "old-fashioned" ones, can you open the door?

I have thought about this for a long time. If you have to get out to cut network or strings, will it open?
 

RDFF

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That'll probably depend on the loader. I've got a 2001 Mustang 2105... same as a Gehl 7800/7810, and I can put my spear in a bale, and still open the door. But I'm sure that with a lot of them it won't happen. I also have mine equipped with a Loegering VTS track set, which raises the whole rig up off the ground about another 5", so that would mean that my spear is lower in relationship to the door clearance. Maybe if I was using the tires, it wouldn't work for me either? Those tracks are pretty much indispensable for me... makes the skid loader into at least double the machine it would be without them! They add 3600# of weight... incredibly stable. Never gets stuck in the snow... goes right over the drifts like a snowmobile. I've never gotten it hung up in like 7 years.

Bale Unroller on Skid Loader.jpg

On the netwrap, I've been having alot of trouble with the wrap frozen on the underside of the bale, and it's really a pain. Planning on putting the bales up on an elevated double rail system next season to keep them off the ground. Seems like the rest of the way around the bale hasn't been a problem. Very much prefer the netwrap though for shedding water and keeping the bales in good shape.
 
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M & P

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A question I have always had, how do you get in the Skid Steer with a bale on the front?
It's not easy getting in and out with a New Holland that is why I like to use the tractor anytime I can.
But when the mud gets deep that track loader will go anywhere.
Something I have done is stab the bale as high as I can and raise it a foot off the ground, then you can swing the door wide open.

I'm not saying that it's a good idea.
 

sstterry

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It's not easy getting in and out with a New Holland that is why I like to use the tractor anytime I can.
But when the mud gets deep that track loader will go anywhere.
Something I have done is stab the bale as high as I can and raise it a foot off the ground, then you can swing the door wide open.

I'm not saying that it's a good idea.
And that is why I asked. Thank you.
 

gcreekrch

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TMR is an inefficient, expensive way to grind a bale. Most of the big guys here get a custom guy in with a tub grinder or use a bale shredder on the bales first.
And feed all that ground up plastic to there animals and wonder why strange deaths happen. Can you imagine the pain a cow goes through before she dies being bound up with plastic?
 

Rydero

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And feed all that ground up plastic to there animals and wonder why strange deaths happen. Can you imagine the pain a cow goes through before she dies being bound up with plastic?
I'm no fan of feeding plastic to cows. I cut and pull my twines. Sisal is often impractical here because we have so many low runs and tend to get wet falls. I've been using biodegradable plastic for a few years now.

At work he shreds or gets bales run through the tub grinder. Tbh you don't see much twine around after processing.and what you see is chopped up so small I'd think it would pass rather than cause a blockage. Don't see many unexplained deaths - I can't remember the last head scratcher.

I'd be far more concerned with blockages in a herd where the farmer uses plastic, feeds in rings and isn't very diligent about cutting or getting them all. Cows chewing 20 feet (or more) of twine like bubble gum, when a big wad gets swallowed it can't be good. An awful way to die for sure. If you don't want to cut them use sisal.
 

collegeboundgal

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We cut an pull each and every little string from the net wrap. Even the little bit that can get pulled off and is stuck in the ground in the hay lot when picking them up to feed. It can be a bit of a b**** getting it pulled off when it is a solid chunk of frozen ice fused together with the hay bale, but I will beat, cut and hack it off before I leave it on. My husband is the same way. If we lived where this was more of a problem all winter long, we would do what we could to get the hay under shelter. Even if it was a tarp. (which we have done).
 

Atimm693

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What Rydero said - the cows will eat that net wrap and it will accumulate in their stomachs. Eat enough and it will kill them.

If it is processed properly they'll pass it without much of an issue.

Hammer mill type bale processors will shred it into tiny strands, the big mobile grinder services don't bother cutting off the net before processing. If you dig through the hay pile, the pieces of net that you will find are about the size of a blade of grass. We fed that stuff for two years without an issue.

A vertical mixer won't process it hardly at all, at most will tear it into long strips. You don't want the cows chewing on that.

My biggest gripe with net is that it will loop around the clip on your knife and slip it right out of your pocket without you noticing. I've lost 3 or 4 good knives because of it.

As for cutting it, a rough edge works better than a sharp one. Take your hay knife and give it a few swipes on some rough concrete. You won't believe the difference.
 
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