Dang.... that was hard to do.

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CCCowman

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I know most everybody on here has done it but (long story short...) I had to take my 9 year old bull off to the market Saturday. My first bull I'd ever owned all by myself. He spoiled me.... I'll not have another like him. 4-5 years ago he was a beast at 2,300 lbs! All bull but gentle as a lamb. Every year when it was time to vaccinate him I'd throw a couple scopes of feed on the ground and he'd stand there and let me do what I needed to do. He craved attention. Mainly a good head scratch and/or back scratch. He'd meet me at the top of the hill when he heard my truck or saw my out. He was my pet. I know, I shouldn't have made him that way. He'd gotten a bad infection in his jaw and it turned into lumpy jaw. Got around Ok but he'd lost a bunch of weight. It was time. When it was my turn to unload him I got out, scratched his head real good and thanked him for all the nice calves he provided. Didn't think it'd be hard to watch him walk off the trailer and down the sale barn alley. But dang..... that was hard to do.
 

Dsth

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that bull gave you memories that will last a lifetime. glad you were able to build that bond with him and sorry for your loss.
 

jltrent

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I'm about to haul off a couple of cows that were born in 2004.
I have six cows separated that gets extra attention, 4 with calves and another to have one shortly I raised in 2005. This is their last go around. One is a garden garbage disposal as she will eat anything throwed across the fence out of the garden. She is one my mother does not want sold so she will die of old age.
 

A.J.

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Sorry that you had to sell him before you wanted to. It’s never easy with one like that even when you know it’s time and the right thing to do. He sounds like he was a dandy. You always remember the good ones like that. It can leave a bit of a void for a while when you don’t see them in the field anymore. Hope you got a decent check for him. That can help soften the blow.
 

SBMF 2015

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I'm about to haul off a couple of cows that were born in 2004.
My last '04 cow died right after the polar vortex of '18. -30 actual temp with 50mph wind was just to much. She had earned the right to die on the farm. Calved every year, raised 3 sets of twins. If I had a bucket she would lead the group anywhere.
 

Brute 23

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Had to put a bull down a couple years ago that was good as gold and had several years left. Neighbors Char bull came thru the fence and he tore some thing in his leg fighting. He could still get around but couldn't breed. To add to it I bought the bull off a friends dad and he loved that bull. The dad had passed away maybe 6 months before the bull got hurt.

I had the vet come out and put him down. We buried him with a back hoe after that behind the pens. No way I could put a bullet in him.

I've been known to pay people to haul certain animals to auction for me.
 

ARS

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Sorry to hear that! I can empathize - a few weeks ago we had to ship our 6 y/o bull due to not passing his BSE this year. We officially started our herd 5 years ago with him and 3 half-sub heifers. He was tame as could be and only wanted feed and scratches. We sometimes said he was TOO tame because he wouldn’t move unless he wanted to or you had a bucket of grain in from to him. He try to rub against you not realizing that he weighed close to a ton. Made moving him a chore sometimes, but I guess it’s much better than the alternative!

We bought his replacement last week and this new one is little flighty so we’ve been working to calm him down and get used to us. We’re moving a heifer in with him soon to hopefully breed a little early. Hopefully a calm companion will help him.
 

TennesseeTuxedo

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I know most everybody on here has done it but (long story short...) I had to take my 9 year old bull off to the market Saturday. My first bull I'd ever owned all by myself. He spoiled me.... I'll not have another like him. 4-5 years ago he was a beast at 2,300 lbs! All bull but gentle as a lamb. Every year when it was time to vaccinate him I'd throw a couple scopes of feed on the ground and he'd stand there and let me do what I needed to do. He craved attention. Mainly a good head scratch and/or back scratch. He'd meet me at the top of the hill when he heard my truck or saw my out. He was my pet. I know, I shouldn't have made him that way. He'd gotten a bad infection in his jaw and it turned into lumpy jaw. Got around Ok but he'd lost a bunch of weight. It was time. When it was my turn to unload him I got out, scratched his head real good and thanked him for all the nice calves he provided. Didn't think it'd be hard to watch him walk off the trailer and down the sale barn alley. But dang..... that was hard to do.
Always easier watching a crazy one walk that long green mile. Sounds like you had a great run with your bull.
 

Hpacres440p

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Wish there were more direct to packer facilities that would buy them, rather than putting them through the sale barn
 

farmerjan

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We had a red poll bull that had a broken bone in his hock... vet said he would never be any good.... rear leg of course.
But he said if we kept him totally away from the cows, and quiet, on flat ground, it might heal but he doubted it. Bubba got 6 months of living with the sheep there.... and had another long run with cows for probably 6-7 years. Finally his arthritis got to where he was having trouble getting up and we knew that the winter would be much too painful. Took him to a dealer/buyer we knew who shipped out of his barn direct to a slaughter facility; so he would not have to go through the ring and all that. He was a pet too, would come to call out in the field, you could open the trailer doors out in the middle of the pasture and take a bucket and in he would go... knew he was going to see some "girls".... son delivered him and we both cried....

My first beef cow, that I raised on one of my dairy cows, calved faithfully every 11-14 months. Had her 2nd bull calf at 13 or so... always had heifers..... and it was about 5-6 months when she started looking thin and went down. I took the .243 up and talked to her for a few minutes and put her down myself. Said she would not suffer and that she deserved to die out in the pasture where she belonged.
Buried my 1st guernsey cow... she was 15... I was her 2nd owner... old man had a dairy, then a couple strokes, sold out except for her for milk for the house; then grandkids went to college and he had another bad stroke and was bedridden... bought her at the stockyard...they had her 7 years and I had her 8 more. Got down in the creek.... had a neighbor come shoot her and buried her...
Can't do it with them all, but there are a few that deserved to die on the farm.
 

BFE

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I have to move along the bull I named after my neighbor, who was more like an uncle to me than just a friend. Bull was out of the last group of calves he ever raised before passing away. Bull failed his BSE Friday. Phenotypically, best bull I've ever owned, and he has calves coming very soon, but I can't chance it going forward. Lesson learned, never pet name livestock, they'll break your heart.
 

jltrent

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I have to move along the bull I named after my neighbor, who was more like an uncle to me than just a friend. Bull was out of the last group of calves he ever raised before passing away. Bull failed his BSE Friday. Phenotypically, best bull I've ever owned, and he has calves coming very soon, but I can't chance it going forward. Lesson learned, never pet name livestock, they'll break your heart.
Your best cow has a nice bull calf you might continue the legacy. I have one I am keeping that is about 1200 lbs now off from one of my best cows and he looks better than his dad which I had good luck with. He gets taller and longer every few days it seems and easy to deal with.
 

cfry

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I recently sold my three cows that started my herd in 2005. Those girls made some pretty calves all these years. Never thought it would be that hard to get rid of something that isn’t a “pet”. The y got a real nice last supper and I just sat with them. Good news is that farm life goes on and so does their bloodline.
 

Mrcopier

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Man I feel your pain. Been there done that..sucks
I recently sold my three cows that started my herd in 2005. Those girls made some pretty calves all these years. Never thought it would be that hard to get rid of something that isn’t a “pet”. The y got a real nice last supper and I just sat with them. Good news is that farm life goes on and so does their bloodline.
In some respects I think they are pets
 
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