cutting off horns

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Anonymous

I just bought a heifer and she has horns about 2 inches long. I have seen horns cut off older cows with what I guess was an OB wire. Their horns were hollow and there was no bleeding.. The horns on younger animals are not hollow. Will the OB cable cut them without any bleeding? I want them cut even with the top of her head and am looking for the best way to do this. I have seen them sawed off, but that was messy and seemed to be very painful. thanks gene

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Anonymous

An OB wire will work but I would bet on it bleeding. When we work stocker calves we use a shrub trimmer/pruner availiable at any hardware store to cut off the horns then we use a branding iron to cauterize the wound. A powder is also availiable to stop the bleeding. I don't like to use a OB wire because it takes too long and is cumbersome. Dehorning tools are availiable but they cost as much as 5 or ten pruners and the pruner is just as effective.
 
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Anonymous

thanks jr

do the horns on calves try to grow back? i have heard they do, and i have heard that if you cut them off even with the top of the head, the hair will grow over where the horn used to be. maybe either can happen.. what is your experience with this?

gene

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Anonymous

Cutting off flush with the head won't get the horn root tissue, depending on how deep you go you may get some, all, or none. In which case the horn will in peculiar shapes, no growth or lots of growth. The reson for using dehorning scoops is they get down far enough to to remove the horn growing tissue. Yes it's a mess. The vets I've seen do it sccop out the horn, then there is usually a vein that really bleeds, they pull it with a pair of forceps, the bleeding nearly completely stops. Some put a thin layer of gauze over the open sinus and dose it with blood stop powder, some just leave it open.

dunmovin farms

> thanks jr

> do the horns on calves try to grow
> back? i have heard they do, and i
> have heard that if you cut them
> off even with the top of the head,
> the hair will grow over where the
> horn used to be. maybe either can
> happen.. what is your experience
> with this?

> gene
 
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Anonymous

If dehorned properly (like Dunmovin said with the proper tools) the horn should not grow back and yes, the hair will grow back. If you dehorn at a very young age, you can use a paste dehorner. You shave the hair around the small "buttons" and apply the paste on the button & surrounding skin. I recommend keeping the calf away from the cow & other calves for 2-4 hours, because it is a caustic paste and it will burn the skin it touches - like the cows udder. I have very few horned calves, but I have used the paste. Also, have used electric dehorners. Again, it needs to be done at a young age (not as young as with the paste). They work great. Best way is to eliminate them at conception. Jeanne
> Cutting off flush with the head
> won't get the horn root tissue,
> depending on how deep you go you
> may get some, all, or none. In
> which case the horn will in
> peculiar shapes, no growth or lots
> of growth. The reson for using
> dehorning scoops is they get down
> far enough to to remove the horn
> growing tissue. Yes it's a mess.
> The vets I've seen do it sccop out
> the horn, then there is usually a
> vein that really bleeds, they pull
> it with a pair of forceps, the
> bleeding nearly completely stops.
> Some put a thin layer of gauze
> over the open sinus and dose it
> with blood stop powder, some just
> leave it open.

> dunmovin farms

Simme Valley in NY
[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

I'm beginning to worry, around here I'm considered and old maverick. You and I seem to agree an awfull lot of stuff. I still use your term COD.

dunmovin farms

> If dehorned properly (like
> Dunmovin said with the proper
> tools) the horn should not grow
> back and yes, the hair will grow
> back. If you dehorn at a very
> young age, you can use a paste
> dehorner. You shave the hair
> around the small
> "buttons" and apply the
> paste on the button &
> surrounding skin. I recommend
> keeping the calf away from the cow
> & other calves for 2-4 hours,
> because it is a caustic paste and
> it will burn the skin it touches -
> like the cows udder. I have very
> few horned calves, but I have used
> the paste. Also, have used
> electric dehorners. Again, it
> needs to be done at a young age
> (not as young as with the paste).
> They work great. Best way is to
> eliminate them at conception.
> Jeanne
 
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A

Anonymous

Age (maybe a little experience) makes us wiser! Just so everyone else doesn't think we're swearing - COD was a term I used in a posting - I believe (see - old age) referred to Cull on Disposition!) I always check your postings first to see if there is any reason to respond to someones question. Sometimes you leave room for comments. You always beat me to the punch. I get on-line at 6:30 am before others post questions. Jeanne

> I'm beginning to worry, around
> here I'm considered and old
> maverick. You and I seem to agree
> an awfull lot of stuff. I still
> use your term COD.

> dunmovin farms

Simme Valley in NY
[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

My neighbor and I dehorned 2 of my steers this fall. We waited til it finally got cold out so that flies wouldnt be a problem. We notched the base of the horns with a file and put cstration bands on them. It worked great - the horns (about 1 1/2 inches) fell off in about 3 or 4 weeks and havent shown any signs of growing back. My question is, one of the steers got nose bleeds before each horn fell off - what causes this?

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Anonymous

The horn is located directly on a large sinus, if there was any bleeding in the sinus because of the horn falling off, it would drain out the nostrils

dunmovin farms

> My neighbor and I dehorned 2 of my
> steers this fall. We waited til it
> finally got cold out so that flies
> wouldnt be a problem. We notched
> the base of the horns with a file
> and put cstration bands on them.
> It worked great - the horns (about
> 1 1/2 inches) fell off in about 3
> or 4 weeks and havent shown any
> signs of growing back. My question
> is, one of the steers got nose
> bleeds before each horn fell off -
> what causes this?
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> I just bought a heifer and she has
> horns about 2 inches long. I have
> seen horns cut off older cows with
> what I guess was an OB wire. Their
> horns were hollow and there was no
> bleeding.. The horns on younger
> animals are not hollow. Will the
> OB cable cut them without any
> bleeding? I want them cut even
> with the top of her head and am
> looking for the best way to do
> this. I have seen them sawed off,
> but that was messy and seemed to
> be very painful. thanks gene well you might want to check with a vet in your area
 

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