Current price trends?

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Dave

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They had about 100 bred cows at Vale yesterday. The vet there writes a number of months bred on the cows back. They put a paint mark on their back to show the age. Up on the shoulders on a young one and over the tail head for a broken mouth cow. The auctioneer would try to sell by the head but if he didn't get a bid pretty quick he went to the pound price. Any bred 3 months or less were just pounded and the kill buyers bought them. I bought 3 older cows. One by the head and 2 by the pound. I paid $0.49 and 0.52 by the pound for 6 & 7 month bred decent looking older cows. I never saw anything bring 58 cents from either the kill buyers or to go back to the country.
 

Dave

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Way back on about page 2 I mentioned some Jersey heifer that couldn't get a bid. Well yesterday I watched a 440 pound Jersey heifer sell for $75 by the head. She was clear down to $25 before they got a bid.
 

BC

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They had about 100 bred cows at Vale yesterday. The vet there writes a number of months bred on the cows back. They put a paint mark on their back to show the age. Up on the shoulders on a young one and over the tail head for a broken mouth cow. The auctioneer would try to sell by the head but if he didn't get a bid pretty quick he went to the pound price. Any bred 3 months or less were just pounded and the kill buyers bought them. I bought 3 older cows. One by the head and 2 by the pound. I paid $0.49 and 0.52 by the pound for 6 & 7 month bred decent looking older cows. I never saw anything bring 58 cents from either the kill buyers or to go back to the country.
Here is the market report from last Saturday at our local market.

 

farmerjan

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If you want to sell a bred cow, as a bred cow, then you have the right to tell them that she needs to be sold that way. We have a "head pen" here where they will sell cows that are bred or have small calves with them. HOWEVER, it doesn't matter if she is bred or not, if there are no bids from someone wanting a take home cow, she will get sold to whomever bids. And the auctioneer is at liberty to sell her by the lb if there are no bids at a "head" or per cow price.
If you decide to sell her, because she has balloon teats when she first calves, and you told them that, you may have sealed her fate right there. No one will buy a cow for a replacement if all that info is there either. I can speak from experience as someone who has more of the "be honest and tell all you can" ideology...... I used to be that way. And I did want to know all I could about a cow that I bring home. BUT, that cow is there BECAUSE you don't want her. Why should someone else want what you don't want??

I am not being a "b%[email protected]#" about this. I have called sellers after I have bought animals to ask if there is any quirks I should know and most will tell you. Like @TCRanch said, she sold one and the cow was going to go and she knew that it was a chance what the cow would do.
The other thing is that most sale barns will have some "bred cow sales" or some "replacements sale". Two of them here have a monthly bred cow sale. Anyone can sell, the vet will preg ck and do as @Dave mentioned . Mark the months bred or trimester on the cow, age will be announced or marked in some way. Short breds will almost always wind up as cull/pound cows. Nut cases will often go on the kill trucks too.
If you cull it, then it is gone. If you have that much caring, then you have to make up your mind to not cull her. I have been there, done that. We usually wait for a bred cow sale to ship a cow we really have mixed feelings about, but don't necessarily want to see go to kill. Or out of synch with the rest.....Mostly all we cull are cows we decide that we don't want to raise another calf.....old, not great milkers, bad attitude, bad feet or legs...... they are cows we keep until they calve, then they go to a separate pasture where there is no bull, can't get bred back, and get a final time to live out a season and raise their calf. At the end of the grazing season, they get on the truck with the calves, and we have kept a few of the heifers they raised their last time around because we liked them. 99% of what we cull are AGE related. And with the age comes the other problems, legs, breeding problems..... we have culled a few that didn't milk and they left with their calves at weaning time and were not preg checked so we weren't tempted to keep them for the third or fourth time.
We don't cull for being out of synch because we run 2 calving groups. They go with the next group. IF they have problems breeding back again.... then they just go.........

I am sorry that you didn't get what you thought the cow was worth. But she was only worth that price to you and others paid what they felt she was worth to them. We had some pretty poor prices a couple weeks ago..... OLD COWS....... 40's ...... and we let them go. If you don't want to let them go for what you don't think is a fair price... then @kenny thomas is right. Bid back your animals. We do, have done it often if the prices are off. We also spend alot of time watching the weekly prices and try to make decisions to sell, based on that. But we never ship anything without one of us being there to watch or have someone we trust to watch and have some base prices we won't stuff go for less.
My son has told me that I have more scruples than most, because I don't want to foist off a crappy milker or a bad attitude cow at a bred sale. I will refuse to sell her to someone else that way and will cull her. Take my lumps. But that is me.
OR else, make her into hamburger and stew meat and put more value into your freezer.
 

rollinhills

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I haven't seen BRCW on any I've sold. You said she was older, maybe broken mouth? They do preg check most of them unless they're clearly a canner. Most of them will have P1, P2 or P3 (for trimester) written on their hip. Even if you guarantee-open heifer calves, they preg check.

I sold a 13 1/2 year old cow a few months ago. One of my faves but she was falling behind and (bless her heart) didn't even have hair on the back of her ears anymore - winters are hard for her. But she was solid, short mouth, still maintaining condition and actually sold as bred. A lot of people pick up older, bred cows to get one more calf out of them and then sell.
This is off subject but we are leaving Sunday morning to your neck of the woods to go Pheasant hunting, we are going to the Anthony area
 

bird dog

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My old cow weighed 1435 and brought .53 lb. About what I expected. Heavy bred decent looking cows were more expensive than what I would pay.

I bought a 765 lb, 5 month bred red angus heifer for $620. She was thin, hungry and thirsty when I got her home. Somebody lost money on her. I may do the same but it seemed like a good risk reward. We'll see.
 

kenny thomas

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My old cow weighed 1435 and brought .53 lb. About what I expected. Heavy bred decent looking cows were more expensive than what I would pay.

I bought a 765 lb, 5 month bred red angus heifer for $620. She was thin, hungry and thirsty when I got her home. Somebody lost money on her. I may do the same but it seemed like a good risk reward. We'll see.
That's the money making kind
 

Dave

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The last two days I bought 6 broken mouth cows. One 7 month bred, one 5 months, the rest are 6 months. Averaged $578 a head. They averaged weighing 1,175. There were other better looking BM cows but they were heavier and kill price kept them up over $700. At this point and the amount of winter feeding ahead of us I am shooting to keep it under $600. In a month or so I will raise my price but for now I have been figuring $2 a day to feed so I have to allow for that.
 

Stocker Steve

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The last two days I bought 6 broken mouth cows. One 7 month bred, one 5 months, the rest are 6 months. Averaged $578 a head. They averaged weighing 1,175. There were other better looking BM cows but they were heavier and kill price kept them up over $700. At this point and the amount of winter feeding ahead of us I am shooting to keep it under $600. In a month or so I will raise my price but for now I have been figuring $2 a day to feed so I have to allow for that.
Is there some grain in $2 /day?
 

Dave

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Is there some grain in $2 /day?
Cows here never see grain. This is not a grain raising area so it is not on the menu. Hay is running about $120 a ton. Some grass a little less, alfalfa more. That is 6 cents a pound. 30 pounds per cow per day is $1.80. Fuel, labor, minerals, and other expenses ........ we just ball park it to be $2.00.
 

Buck Randall

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Even if you do live in grain country, unless you are buying all your hay, I don't see how anyone can afford to feed grain to cows. If you buy all your hay, I think corn would pencil out for them.
Growing corn to feed cows is cheaper per ton than growing hay. Lots of cows in the midwest get some combination of corn silage, corn fodder, dry corn and distiller's grain all winter.
 

Stocker Steve

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There are many reports out there on economics of limit feeding a shell corn supplement instead of 100% hay. Usually as a drought plan when hay is high priced and corn is not. Cow hay is currently $75 to $100 per ton here.

I think the recent rally in grain prices will continue. Supplementing with $2.50 corn may be a thing of the past. So we need to revisit stocking rates and winter rations. low input operations usually win.
 
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There are many reports out there on economics of limit feeding a shell corn supplement instead of 100% hay. Usually as a drought plan when hay is high priced and corn is not. Cow hay is currently $75 to $100 per ton here.

I think the recent rally in grain prices will continue. Supplementing with $2.50 corn may be a thing of the past. So we need to revisit stocking rates and winter rations. low input operations usually win.
Feeding corn will be thing of my past; we don’t grow corn but pay coop to fill a little grain cart full of steak maker corn based feed, then crepe-feed it but probably won’t anymore since our neighbor got more for his smaller cattle than we did for heavier. So hubby and I agreed why feed em after 6mos weaning- more money in smaller bodies.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Yes, I totally agree if you have the ability to raise it. There are a lot of beef producers that do NOT raise any corn, but think it is necessary to feed their cows grain out of a bag all the time. Everyone has their personal reasons. Heck, I feed handful of corn now & then to my cows when I'm AI'ing and catching. They don't NEED it, I "need" it to make chores faster - LOL
 
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