Cull cows - CWT

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dun

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CWT to remove more than 100,000 cows
Dairy Herd news source | Wednesday, May 13, 2009

The dairy industry’s self-help program, Cooperatives Working Together (CWT), announced today that it has tentatively accepted 388 bids representing 102,898 cows and 2 billion pounds of milk production capacity. CWT officials will now begin the task of culling or “retiring” that many cows from the nation’s dairy herd.

It is the first in a series of herd-retirements planned over the next 12 months. The number of cows and pounds of milk represent the largest single herd-retirement carried out in the six-year history of CWT.

Dairy farmers in 41 states submitted a total of 538 herd-retirement bids by the May 1 deadline. The 388 bids tentatively accepted represent 72 percent of the total bids received by CWT. The number of cows now scheduled to be removed account for 64 percent of the total number of cows offered and the 2 billion pounds of milk account for 67 percent of the milk production offered.

“The high percentage of bids CWT selected this time around is an indication that producers understood that CWT would only be able to accept reasonable bids per hundred pounds of milk in order to adjust the nation’s dairy herd and better align supply and demand,” said Jerry Kozak, president and CEO of the National Milk Producers Federation, which administers CWT.

Starting next week, CWT field auditors will begin visiting the 388 farms whose bids were accepted, checking their milk-production records, inspecting their herds, and tagging each cow for processing. All farms should be audited by early July and cows should begin moving off dairies by late May. All bidders will be notified no later than June 12 as to whether their bid was among those accepted.

“The bids selected ranged from farms with fewer than 50 cows to dairies with over 5,000, demonstrating that farms of all sizes in all areas are facing a very difficult year in 2009,” Kozak said. “Those that took advantage of CWT’s offer to retire their herds will aid others still wanting to farm by reducing the amount of milk coming to market and strengthening prices going forward.”

“CWT, thanks to the commitment of 36 cooperative members and over 500 individual dairy farmer members, has the resources to carry out additional herd-retirements in the coming months. That is why CWT will not announce the average level of the bids accepted until all the herd-retirements are completed,” Kozak noted. “We will continue to monitor key economic indicators in order to determine the right time to implement the next herd-retirement.”

Since 2003, CWT has been responsible for culling 285,717 cows through its herd-retirement program. It has also provided export assistance.

Its efforts have been made more imperative in recent months, due to the low milk prices received by dairy producers. Officials hope that removing thousands of cows will help bring supply and demand into better balance.
 

TexasBred

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Wen to the sale earlier this week and packers seem to be taking a beating. Not one cow brought $.50 and most were $.42 to $.47. A lot of pairs were split and the cows packed and they were selling cheap. Pretty much the same for large bulls but not quite as bad.
 

Wormy Coyote

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Its a shame it has to get to this point, a pretty big dairy not far from me shipped its cows last month. I just hate seeing dairys go, not to mention what that many is going to do to the packer prices.
 

novaman

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A neighbor just retired his herd. All this after building a new parlor and free stall barn less than a year ago. Another guy down the road also sold out after putting up a new free stall barn last year. It's looking quite bleak for dairies around here. I have remained quite positive through all this negativity but the prices aren't getting any better and I'm only getting in worse shape the longer this goes on. I fully expected by now there would be some relief in sight.
 

TexasBred

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novaman":3s6o42hb said:
A neighbor just retired his herd. All this after building a new parlor and free stall barn less than a year ago. Another guy down the road also sold out after putting up a new free stall barn last year. It's looking quite bleak for dairies around here. I have remained quite positive through all this negativity but the prices aren't getting any better and I'm only getting in worse shape the longer this goes on. I fully expected by now there would be some relief in sight.

That's the difference between $22 milk and $10 milk.
 

bigbull338

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i know milk prices are low.but i dont reckon every darymen is hurting.i talked to guy 2 or 3wks ago at length.an he is a herdsmen for a vet i know.an they just bought a dairy 2yrs ago.he said they are milking 190hd in an old double 8 flatbarn.taking 2hrs to milk.an he is milking mostly jerseys an jersey crosses.with a few holsteins left to cull.an his tank ave is 60lbs a day.an all they get is 30lbs of feed in the barn.an graze the pastures.he also said their BF is a 3.9 an protine 3.6.an they just bought 30 reg jersey heifers an cows off a dairy i know for $1400ea.so they are doing real good.
 

1982vett

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novaman":2stfmqor said:
A neighbor just retired his herd. All this after building a new parlor and free stall barn less than a year ago. Another guy down the road also sold out after putting up a new free stall barn last year. It's looking quite bleak for dairies around here. I have remained quite positive through all this negativity but the prices aren't getting any better and I'm only getting in worse shape the longer this goes on. I fully expected by now there would be some relief in sight.
Could that have been his mistake? Had to sell cows to pay for a barn?

I know much of my problems are spending to much to make the place look nice and facilities to make life easier. Money spent on these type facilities doesn't seem pay for themselves now-a-days.
 

TexasBred

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bigbull338":1y89syz1 said:
i know milk prices are low.but i dont reckon every darymen is hurting.i talked to guy 2 or 3wks ago at length.an he is a herdsmen for a vet i know.an they just bought a dairy 2yrs ago.he said they are milking 190hd in an old double 8 flatbarn.taking 2hrs to milk.an he is milking mostly jerseys an jersey crosses.with a few holsteins left to cull.an his tank ave is 60lbs a day.an all they get is 30lbs of feed in the barn.an graze the pastures.he also said their BF is a 3.9 an protine 3.6.an they just bought 30 reg jersey heifers an cows off a dairy i know for $1400ea.so they are doing real good.

Some of that I can believe...some of it not...I'd like to see him milk 190 head in a double 8 faltbarn first thing and get 30 lbs. of grain into them at the same time.......and if he's getting a 60 lb. tank average on a herd of Texas jersey's this time of the year would be my second question. The protein is good but BF should be much better. Still question him making any real money even tho milk is up a little and feed cost are down some. Course his vet bills will zero. :lol2:
 

novaman

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1982vett":986gdthu said:
novaman":986gdthu said:
A neighbor just retired his herd. All this after building a new parlor and free stall barn less than a year ago. Another guy down the road also sold out after putting up a new free stall barn last year. It's looking quite bleak for dairies around here. I have remained quite positive through all this negativity but the prices aren't getting any better and I'm only getting in worse shape the longer this goes on. I fully expected by now there would be some relief in sight.
Could that have been his mistake? Had to sell cows to pay for a barn?

I know much of my problems are spending to much to make the place look nice and facilities to make life easier. Money spent on these type facilities doesn't seem pay for themselves now-a-days.
My guess is that it was the deciding factor. Its a tough world I guess. I can't say I wouldn't have done the same thing with milk at $20. Who would have guessed it could drop this far, this fast?

TexasBred":986gdthu said:
bigbull338":986gdthu said:
i know milk prices are low.but i dont reckon every darymen is hurting.i talked to guy 2 or 3wks ago at length.an he is a herdsmen for a vet i know.an they just bought a dairy 2yrs ago.he said they are milking 190hd in an old double 8 flatbarn.taking 2hrs to milk.an he is milking mostly jerseys an jersey crosses.with a few holsteins left to cull.an his tank ave is 60lbs a day.an all they get is 30lbs of feed in the barn.an graze the pastures.he also said their BF is a 3.9 an protine 3.6.an they just bought 30 reg jersey heifers an cows off a dairy i know for $1400ea.so they are doing real good.

Some of that I can believe...some of it not...I'd like to see him milk 190 head in a double 8 faltbarn first thing and get 30 lbs. of grain into them at the same time.......and if he's getting a 60 lb. tank average on a herd of Texas jersey's this time of the year would be my second question. The protein is good but BF should be much better. Still question him making any real money even tho milk is up a little and feed cost are down some. Course his vet bills will zero. :lol2:

I highly doubt anybody is making any money in dairy at this point in time. If he is making money he must be one heck of a dairyman and/or know something nobody else does.
 

novaman

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Wormy Coyote":2a2de28z said:
I love that calf in your avatar novaman, I need about ten heifers with those markings.
Thanks. She's getting to breeding age now and definately one of my favorites. Has a good attitude and easy to work with.
 

bigbull338

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it dont take a cow long to eat 15lbs of feed a milking.an they have tobe making money or they wouldve been under all ready.because they buy all their hay.they graze the cows on 200acs of grass.i know the vet that owns the dairy.an i also know the herdmens family.an ive known them for almost 40yrs.im sure its a good tax write off.the vet owns 2 practices.
 

TexasBred

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My guess is that it was the deciding factor. Its a tough world I guess. I can't say I wouldn't have done the same thing with milk at $20. Who would have guessed it could drop this far, this fast?

First thought would have been "who would have guessed it would have ever gotten to $20 this fast" down here in our area. He should have known that at that price milk prices could only go one direction and that was down !!
 

TexasBred

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bigbull338":bhdrh41k said:
it dont take a cow long to eat 15lbs of feed a milking.an they have tobe making money or they wouldve been under all ready.because they buy all their hay.they graze the cows on 200acs of grass.i know the vet that owns the dairy.an i also know the herdmens family.an ive known them for almost 40yrs.im sure its a good tax write off.the vet owns 2 practices.

Typically a dairy cow can eat 1 lb. per minute, jerseys somewhat less...to run cattle thru that barn that fast they wouldn't have time to either eat that much or give that much milk. He's emptying the barn every 10 minutes to milk in 2 hours in a double 8. Figuing prep and post dipping etc. those cattle only have about 6 minutes to milk out and eat 15 lbs. of feed each milking. But no doubt a good tax write off.
 

bigbull338

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you forgot 1 thing.cows can suck pelleted feed down faster than textured feed.the milkhands are constantly moving to milk that fast.i told him id put 8 milkers on each side.insted of swinging them tween the cows.they have auto take offs.but dont know if they use them.
 

TexasBred

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bigbull338":uvgc991s said:
you forgot 1 thing.cows can suck pelleted feed down faster than textured feed.the milkhands are constantly moving to milk that fast.i told him id put 8 milkers on each side.insted of swinging them tween the cows.they have auto take offs.but dont know if they use them.

BB I'm talking pelleted feed. I still don't think they can milk 190 cows in 2 hours in that setup even with 16 milkers and automatic takeoffs. With all the pre and post work that has to be down to each cow I just don't think it's physically possible. They MIGHT milk 60 an hour. 30 lbs. of pellets seems like a lot of feed for typical Texas jersey cattle as well.
 

bigbull338

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well he said the longest milking was 2.5hrs but said most was 2hrs.an im assuming thats not wash up time.
 

TexasBred

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bigbull338":1tkx78cg said:
well he said the longest milking was 2.5hrs but said most was 2hrs.an im assuming thats not wash up time.

That would be a sight to watch. He's not fooling anybody but himself.

Bull, saw one dairy for sale today. milking 87.5 lb.tank average, several two year olds milking over 103.5 lbs. and one top cow milking 163 lb. per day and over 50 cows milking over 100 lbs. per day....30 years of AI breeding to top ABS, Select Sires, Semex, Genex and Alta bulls. 132,000 SCC.
 

bigbull338

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those cows are milking theirselves to death.i bet they want $2000 a hd or more for them.
 

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