Cross breeding

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Anonymous

I happen to be a real fan of this particular cross, the F1's also make great cows. My views/experience is that you want the highest marbling Gelbvieh you can find, but that is the last crieria to look for. High calving ease EPDs for both him and maternal, moderate mature size, even a moderate framed Gelbveh is pretty good sized, non-diluter. However, unless the heifers are really bog well grown out girls, I wouldn't use a Gelbvieh on an Angus heifer, I would stick with British for that first calf. I have found, although I've never seen a formal study of it, that when you cross breed, not only do you get additional growth from heterosis after birth, that you also get it before, the calves are bigger then you would expect. Also, that bigger faster growing calf will require more groceries from the heifer when she is still growing herself. If she is worth her salt, she will loose condition and give up all she can to keep that calf satisfied, this can cause slower breeding back then may be desired. Many cows miss breeding back the year they calf for the first time, it's a nutritinal thing. MU wifes Hereford heifer had a Red Angus sired calf this last spring, we expected from his EPDs that it would be a small calf, she pooped out three weeks early at over 80 lbs, The heifer lost weight like crazy for about a month and a half until I caught a weaned 6 month old Shorthorn heifer helping herself to most of the milk. We sold the Shorthorn and put the Hereford on some grain twice a day for about a month, she gained back some condition and bred back on time. Her calf weaned off at 500 lbs at 195 days, that's what I meant by the cow giving all she has. As I said my views/experience

dunmovin farms

> I have some nice black Angus
> heifers I would like to breed to a
> young red Gelbvieh bull. Any
> comments....
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> I happen to be a real fan of this
> particular cross, the F1's also
> make great cows. My
> views/experience is that you want
> the highest marbling Gelbvieh you
> can find, but that is the last
> crieria to look for. High calving
> ease EPDs for both him and
> maternal, moderate mature size,
> even a moderate framed Gelbveh is
> pretty good sized, non-diluter.
> However, unless the heifers are
> really bog well grown out girls, I
> wouldn't use a Gelbvieh on an
> Angus heifer, I would stick with
> British for that first calf. I
> have found, although I've never
> seen a formal study of it, that
> when you cross breed, not only do
> you get additional growth from
> heterosis after birth, that you
> also get it before, the calves are
> bigger then you would expect.
> Also, that bigger faster growing
> calf will require more groceries
> from the heifer when she is still
> growing herself. If she is worth
> her salt, she will loose condition
> and give up all she can to keep
> that calf satisfied, this can
> cause slower breeding back then
> may be desired. Many cows miss
> breeding back the year they calf
> for the first time, it's a
> nutritinal thing. MU wifes
> Hereford heifer had a Red Angus
> sired calf this last spring, we
> expected from his EPDs that it
> would be a small calf, she pooped
> out three weeks early at over 80
> lbs, The heifer lost weight like
> crazy for about a month and a half
> until I caught a weaned 6 month
> old Shorthorn heifer helping
> herself to most of the milk. We
> sold the Shorthorn and put the
> Hereford on some grain twice a day
> for about a month, she gained back
> some condition and bred back on
> time. Her calf weaned off at 500
> lbs at 195 days, that's what I
> meant by the cow giving all she
> has. As I said my views/experience

> dunmovin farms Thank you dunmovin farms for your views...the EPD on birthweighs on this new Gelbvieh bull turns out to be too high, about 100 pds. I also have some good size heifers out of the Limousin bull we just sold, he injured his back leg some how in pasture this summer and didn't recover, also some heifers out of a black Gelbvieh bull on another part of the ranch...I was thinking about breeding them to a nice young Black Angus bull...your comment.....

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OP
A

Anonymous

If they are really well grown out heifers I wouldn't worry much about even using an average for the black Angus breed BW bull. Personally I would use a very high marbling bull and not worry about ribeye too much and pay attention to muscle, I wouldn't want to give away too much of the muscle from the two continental breeds. If you do a Reproductive condition scheck of the heifers, have the vet or however does it, also check for pelvic dimensions, the actual pevlic measuring tool/device isn't required. Whoever does it sould have been in enough heifers to give you a rough idea of the size, adequate, too small, huge, whatever. Of our F1 Red Angus-Gelbvieh heifers, one is about a FS 6.5 to other FS 5, the 6.5 has a smaller pelvic opening, so you can't tell by the outside. She is still bigger then the pure angus heifers, just smaller then her sisters. Strange We always use calving ease bulls even onm the mature cows, there are enough calving ease bulls with way above average growth to choose from. It seems that even many of the heavy BW bulls don't have that much better WW and YW or muscle then some of the lighter BW bulls. With a young bull it's always a little bit of a crap-shoot, they may be and most of them are, the type that the low EPD numbers and their later high accuracy numbers are pretty close. Every once in a while you get one that just doesn't breed to his EPDs. Remember, sometimes free advice isn't worth as much as you pay for it.

dunmovin farms
 

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