Crippled bull

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Ky hills

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Had our new 15 month old bull out with cows just 12 days, turned out out on May 23. He bred a few cows in that time, In the process the neighbors Jersey bull tried to come over but didn't.
Then a bull came over from another neighbors place that had been letting the owner of the bull run horses there. He just had a small number of bred cows and the bull that he'd put on their place recently.
That bull was 20 months old. Our younger bull is a little taller and not as fat as the other bull. The young bull managed to fight him off several times over the course of the day and night. Got the neighbor bull up the next morning.
Noticed our bull had a slight limp that day.He seemed ok and kept up with the herd, for a couple of days. Then Sunday he was more to himself and seemed a lot worse.
Yesterday evening found him laying off by himself stretched out like he was dead, but as we got closer to him he sat up. He got up and started grazing, but obviously hurt.
Walked him to the barn last night.
His hind leg just under his hip seems to give away sometimes when he takes a step. Good appetite still and mad about being up.
Got a call into the vet waiting to hear back, going to have him come out. We actually bought the bull from the vet.
I'm hoping the bull will be ok.
 
Vet is coming, he is also the breeder of our bull
Bull is eating and bellering like a bull does.
It does seem crazy the run we've had with bulls lately.
Almost unbelievable to me that this young bull was able to fight off the older bull. No doubt in my mind though that if they had fought again the other bull would have gotten the better of him finally with his injury. We got the other bull up and gone as soon as we could.
Wife and I were talking last night if we had turned our big bull out instead none of these little bulls surrounding us would even be on his radar and if they came over he would put them in their place very fast.
I've been trying to replace our BWF bull for several years, never really intended to use him as a main bull, but since we had him I figured I'd turn him out and try to find a good young bull to replace him with.
This Hereford bull is a third attempt at that.
We are surround by small acreage landowners, only two out of 6 are experienced cattle people.
Only one of the properties doesn't have a any cattle. We pretty much have sole responsibility of upkeep of fences between us and most of those properties.
One of our good neighbors sold his cows and is letting a young family run cattle on his place. I learned what rat tailed cattle are thanks to that. We have two calves by their rat tailed CharolaisX bull and watching a 3rd a young heifer that apparently got bred by that bull at 9 months old after we weaned our calves. The timing coincides with the second known time the bull jumped into our fields.
So much stuff happens on the farm it's part of it but coupled with inexperienced or unconcerned folks surrounding you sure makes it frustrating.
We expect that wild and crazy Jersey to come through any time too and even though our big bull won't let him breed anything we will still have the responsibility of fixing fence and getting the wild mess up and hauled to market.
 
Your bull problems are ridiculous. I still vote for rock salt loads as a deterrent, with the last load in the shotgun 00 buck in case they charge.
:unsure: You should only need two loads. Both loads 00 buck. First load in case he faces you in preparing to charge, the second in case he tries to get away.
 
The other scenerio with neighbours who know nothing about cattle are ones that get cows and decide not to breed them, fortunately I don't have any next to me but a fellow down the road has about 8 cows now and about 3 years ago he decided he had enough now and so has not had a bull with his cows. My neighbour Trevor breeds Simmental and his paddocks adjoin them and I saw his vehicle yesterday parked on the road where he had walked into their place to find his bull. Last year I sold a bull for $8000 to another neighbour who has a paddock over the road from these cows and just after I dropped the bull off he was trying to mount a young cow over the fence who had got out and crossed the road to get to the bull. The bull I sold was to replace another bull that was in that paddock that had badly damaged his tackle probably trying to work over this same fence.

Ken
 
The other scenerio with neighbours who know nothing about cattle are ones that get cows and decide not to breed them, fortunately I don't have any next to me but a fellow down the road has about 8 cows now and about 3 years ago he decided he had enough now and so has not had a bull with his cows. My neighbour Trevor breeds Simmental and his paddocks adjoin them and I saw his vehicle yesterday parked on the road where he had walked into their place to find his bull. Last year I sold a bull for $8000 to another neighbour who has a paddock over the road from these cows and just after I dropped the bull off he was trying to mount a young cow over the fence who had got out and crossed the road to get to the bull. The bull I sold was to replace another bull that was in that paddock that had badly damaged his tackle probably trying to work over this same fence.

Ken
Yeah, I've heard of some of those kind too.
I don't know if it's true or not but several years ago somebody said they were talking to a fellow that had several cows for a a couple of years and wondered why he didn't have calves. Man asked him how old his bull was and his reply was he didn't have a bull.
 
The last time the neighbors three year old steer tore up the fence and came into my pasture the neighbor commented that he thought I had electric fence. I told him I did, my electric is set up to discourage the critters from pushing on the woven wire and it keeps my cattle in. Told him I am not responsible for keeping his cattle in. That is his responsibility to keep his cattle on his place.

Chased the one neighbors jersey bull out of my yard with a mop at 11 pm one night. Between the jersey bull and their horses the yard fence
doesn't look to good. Put a hot wire up, I thought the first horse that connected with it was going to knock down some merchantable timber.

Neither neighbor ever checks fences, seldom ever repairs them.

I have so far not had problems with bulls at the one pasture I use. There is barb on top of woven wire.. I installed two hot wires on the neighbors side of the fence and two hot wires on my side. The bulls chat back and forth, but so far have not pushed it.
 
Vet came, said he is stifled.
Hope your cow is doing better.
Oh dang, that sucks! Yes, it's possible with confinement and a lot of TLC for SOME of them to recover, but is that the logical thing to do? In my case, no. I had to sell an awesome 3-year-old bull that stifled, so I feel your pain.

My cow is still eating, drinking, moving, alert. But still down.
 
Oh dang, that sucks! Yes, it's possible with confinement and a lot of TLC for SOME of them to recover, but is that the logical thing to do? In my case, no. I had to sell an awesome 3-year-old bull that stifled, so I feel your pain.

My cow is still eating, drinking, moving, alert. But still down.
Yeah, even if he recovers he is likely to get hurt again.
Hate that you're cow is still down. I know it's extra work to have to care for them like that on top of everything else.
 

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