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Crabgrass invading Coastal

gabby

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Is anyone else seeing more and more crabgrass in good Coastal hay fields? I have some good 30 to 50 year old Coastal hay fields that are getting more and more crabgrass in them. It's a problem because the crabgrass cures a lot slower and it yields less than Coastal.

My county agent blames it on not using enough potash. I've been using 120 units per year but he says that's not nearly enough potash. Production has been good. For instance, I just baled 2.25 tons per acre in my second cutting.

Any tips on what the problem might be and how to kill the crabgrass?
Thanks,
Gabby
 

Brute 23

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There is some thing you can spray across the coastal that will kill the Crabgrass and not hurt the coastal. Our guy that boom sprays weed killer did it for us last year and it only cost like $1 or $2 dollars more an acre. Was well worth it in my opinion.
 

edrsimms

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First of all your County Agent is right as 120 lbs of K/acre is not enough. What is your pH? Normally on bermuda grass pastures we put 200 lbs of K per year (3 to 4 cuttings per yr) although there is no reason to elevate your K unless you have the proper pH. You pH should be around 6.4 optimally and 1 ton of Lime per acre will raise your pH 0.1 per year. Crabgrass loves poor land, so it seems like your pH is probably the culprit along with a low application of K.

If you want to get rid of the crabgrass permanently- there is a way:
Next spring about April, put out OUST XP at 1.5oz per acre in 20 gallons of water per acre. Oust will stunt your grass and you will possibly lose a cutting, but you will never again have Crabgrass. Oust has a residual of about 3 years. Do not use Oust if you plan on putting a legume in your hay fields in the next 3 yrs. But if it was me, I would first get those fields to a Lime index of 6.4
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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Brute 23":jhgtelnb said:
There is some thing you can spray across the coastal that will kill the Crabgrass and not hurt the coastal. Our guy that boom sprays weed killer did it for us last year and it only cost like $1 or $2 dollars more an acre. Was well worth it in my opinion.


Its called 2-4-d
 

edrsimms

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2-4-d amine is a broadleaf weed killer and will not kill crabgrass
 

ga. prime

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edrsimms":21rqrrb9 said:
2-4-d amine is a broadleaf weed killer and will not kill crabgrass

Even if it did, it would cost a good bit more than 1 or 2 dollars an acre.
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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ga. prime":2j6syizv said:
edrsimms":2j6syizv said:
2-4-d amine is a broadleaf weed killer and will not kill crabgrass

Even if it did, it would cost a good bit more than 1 or 2 dollars an acre.


Interesting. My county agents a dumbass then cuz he told me 2-4-d would kill crab grass. Course he aint a farmer and never has been.
 

alabama

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I don't think 2-4D will kill crabgrass.
I can tell you how some of the farmers around me are trying to handle it.
In the spring as soon as the crabgrass starts to green up in the two leaf stage, they spray it with a Qt. of atrozine and a Pt. of crop oil. It seems to help greatly.
 

BC

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We have had luck using glyphosate at 1 pt./acre folowing the first or second cutting. Need to spray before the bermuda greens back up. THat rate is 1/10 the rate to kill bermuda so it is safe to use. Will also work on bahia used the same way.
 

Jogeephus

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BC":2h5psz7p said:
We have had luck using glyphosate at 1 pt./acre folowing the first or second cutting. Need to spray before the bermuda greens back up. THat rate is 1/10 the rate to kill bermuda so it is safe to use. Will also work on bahia used the same way.

I use this same rate to rid any bermuda field of Vassey grass. Works really well. Also found an early spring application of this will make for a very clean first cutting.
 

gabby

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by edrsimms on Sat Aug 29, 2009 4:40 pm

First of all your County Agent is right as 120 lbs of K/acre is not enough. What is your pH? Normally on bermuda grass pastures we put 200 lbs of K per year (3 to 4 cuttings per yr) although there is no reason to elevate your K unless you have the proper pH. You pH should be around 6.4 optimally and 1 ton of Lime per acre will raise your pH 0.1 per year.

Whewee, edrsimms, 1 ton of lime only raises your pH .1 point? What's your soil type? Mine is sandy loam.
 

puma

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We have had good luck using a pint of 41% glysophate per acre to control the summer annuals like crabgrass in coastal. We normally apply around June 1. Have never seen any damage to coastal and the crabgrass usually does not germinate in our area until mid may or so. Does a pretty good job on grass burrs that have emerged as well. We have also done this on newly sprigged coastal with no damage.
 

msscamp

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puma":3fb1wgaj said:
We have had good luck using a pint of 41% glysophate per acre to control the summer annuals like crabgrass in coastal. We normally apply around June 1. Have never seen any damage to coastal and the crabgrass usually does not germinate in our area until mid may or so. Does a pretty good job on grass burrs that have emerged as well. We have also done this on newly sprigged coastal with no damage.

Coastal - that is Bermuda grass, right? I don't know the first thing about coastal, but I was wondering if you might have an idea as to how this would work in, say, Timothy, Orchard Grass, Smooth Brome, or any of the Wheatgrasses? We are up to our ears in sand burrs, and have not been able to find anything to control them in our grass hay fields. Thanks for any help!
 

msscamp

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mnmtranching":llnop4km said:
How do cattle react to sand burrs in round hay bales?

I would imagine the same way they react to sand burrs in square bales(large or small) - they don't care, and simply sort them out.
 

puma

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Yes, coastal is a bermudagrass. Don't know about using in the other grasses. Our use in perennials has been limited to coastal and common bermudagrass. Probably worth a try to use on a small plot, ie 10X10, or something of this order and see what happens to the grass.
 

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