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houstoncutter

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ALACOWMAN":19da1jur said:
Massey135":19da1jur said:
You'll pay 5x what an equivalent horned bull would cost for that polled bull. Not to mention it'll take you all year to locate him. Same w/ the shorthorns.
no id just call George Queener over in Ga. and pick one up... but i do agree with you about shorthorn, their rare in the south........... mostly do to popularity





Shorthorns are nice cattle, but their coloring gets em killed sales wise , in the south. That dusty color or spots on calves is a huge discount in the sale ring.
 
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Massey135

Massey135

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George Queener is in the Angus business now.

There's a pretty sizable shorthorn breeder not too far from ala, in Seymour.

What part of there are linebred red shorthorns, even breeders that are focusing solely on red genetics, do you not understand? Solid red British calf will beat a hard up strait limo at the salebarn every time.

Maybe not 5x, but considerably more. I watched both Hereford bull sales at Ft worth this past year. The prices might have been similar, but the quality sure wasn't.

Take $3-5 grand and go bull shopping. There's disparaging quality differences in polled vs horned (hereford & shorthorn) at those prices.
 

Taurus

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Well I know for sure: they buy more hereford bulls than shorthorns!

But you have to remember that some of us are in commerical cattle business and we have no time for dehorning. I had a horned calf few years ago out of Angus x holstein cow and I had to dehorned him (haul him to another farm that has more experiences with dehorning, removed the horns with a special tool, give him some meds, isolated him from the herd for a week then brought him home) and thankfully it was only one horned calf and hopefully last one.He lost some weight from the dehorning and all these stresses.
 
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Massey135

Massey135

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Your argument just collapsed upon itself: There's more horned hereford than polled.


Your just lost considerably credibility with your account of the dehorning process. "Commercial cattleman", as you would say, would simple run the calf in the shoot, dehorn him, open the gate, and go on to the next one. I've cut off hereford cows horns as big as my arm with keystones and they'd go out and breed back a month early. Don't give me that 'stress' bs.

"With a special tool" "isolate him from the herd" - a cattleman you are not.
 

Taurus

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Massey135":19xf7o3a said:
Your argument just collapsed upon itself: There's more horned hereford than polled.


Your just lost considerably credibility with your account of the dehorning process. "Commercial cattleman", as you would say, would simple run the calf in the shoot, dehorn him, open the gate, and go on to the next one. I've cut off hereford cows horns as big as my arm with keystones and they'd go out and breed back a month early. Don't give me that 'stress' bs.

"With a special tool" "isolate him from the herd" - a cattleman you are not.
? That doesn't make any sense. I never said that there are more horned hereford than polled hereford as they are both common in my areas. It will make more sense to use a polled bull in commerical cattle business as they don't have to deal with all stresses from dehorning. Sometimes it can be messy and bloody. Also my calf is at someone's farm with an experienced cattleman that deals with dehorning as we do not have chute that year till we brought a chute four years ago. The reason why he is isolated from the herd is because we have to wean him and makes sure he don't get any infections from dehorning. Pretty sure he was stressed out from dehorning and all things going on around him, judging from his body condition and weight loss.
 

Taurus

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Red Bull Breeder":3g2fa635 said:
Dought there is many more horned than polled herefords. Been polled herefords for a long time. We had polled herefords back in the 60's.
To be fair, I seen more polled herefords in various ranches than horned herefords, mainly in commerical herds, but I know two ranchers that has horned herefords, however they are not commerical cattlemen. One rancher used his horned hereford bull on the rodeo bucking cows, another rancher just have a herd full of registered hereford cattle (both horned and polled).
 

Red Bull Breeder

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It would depend on what part of the country you are in. Out west you would likely see more horned than polled.

They is a little more to dehorning than ole Massey thinks. I have seen a few bleed to death.
 
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Massey135

Massey135

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Taurus":3hu5wxqd said:
Massey135":3hu5wxqd said:
Your argument just collapsed upon itself: There's more horned hereford than polled.


Your just lost considerably credibility with your account of the dehorning process. "Commercial cattleman", as you would say, would simple run the calf in the shoot, dehorn him, open the gate, and go on to the next one. I've cut off hereford cows horns as big as my arm with keystones and they'd go out and breed back a month early. Don't give me that 'stress' bs.

"With a special tool" "isolate him from the herd" - a cattleman you are not.
? That doesn't make any sense. I never said that there are more horned hereford than polled hereford as they are both common in my areas. It will make more sense to use a polled bull in commerical cattle business as they don't have to deal with all stresses from dehorning. Sometimes it can be messy and bloody. Also my calf is at someone's farm with an experienced cattleman that deals with dehorning as we do not have chute that year till we brought a chute four years ago. The reason why he is isolated from the herd is because we have to wean him and makes sure he don't get any infections from dehorning. Pretty sure he was stressed out from dehorning and all things going on around him, judging from his body condition and weight loss.

Dude, you're out classed. Cattlemen don't speak in these terms.

I said there were more horned bulls. You said "commercial cattlemen" don't want horned bulls. You're wrong.

Dehorning is elementary for cattleman;not a task that takes an experienced cattlemen. Cattleman find the measures you took as unnecessary. If he was stressed, it was bc he was isolated, not bc of the dehorning.

Without a chute, rope him and tie his head to a post. Surely, a cattleman such as yourself can rope?
 

Taurus

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Red Bull Breeder":5rm3p8b1 said:
It would depend on what part of the country you are in. Out west you would likely see more horned than polled.

They is a little more to dehorning than ole Massey thinks. I have seen a few bleed to death.
I once seen a buffalo calf bleed to death while de-horn him two years ago while help out my college bud with his neighbor's buffalo ranch. It's true, there are more horned herefords out in the west as I seen them on cattle drives but in Minnesota, very few horned herefords but they are not that rare.
 
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Massey135

Massey135

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Red Bull Breeder":2venppj5 said:
It would depend on what part of the country you are in. Out west you would likely see more horned than polled.

They is a little more to dehorning than ole Massey thinks. I have seen a few bleed to death.
You look it up and realize your last post was wrong? :cboy:

I've dehorned a lot of cows, BB - I'm sure you have too. Most cattle are unaffected especially calves. I'v only had a couple cases of flystrike ever and iv never had any problems just turning em out.
The cows you're talking bout shoulda never been dehorned.
 

Taurus

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Massey135":2eg90auq said:
Taurus":2eg90auq said:
Massey135":2eg90auq said:
Your argument just collapsed upon itself: There's more horned hereford than polled.


Your just lost considerably credibility with your account of the dehorning process. "Commercial cattleman", as you would say, would simple run the calf in the shoot, dehorn him, open the gate, and go on to the next one. I've cut off hereford cows horns as big as my arm with keystones and they'd go out and breed back a month early. Don't give me that 'stress' bs.

"With a special tool" "isolate him from the herd" - a cattleman you are not.
? That doesn't make any sense. I never said that there are more horned hereford than polled hereford as they are both common in my areas. It will make more sense to use a polled bull in commerical cattle business as they don't have to deal with all stresses from dehorning. Sometimes it can be messy and bloody. Also my calf is at someone's farm with an experienced cattleman that deals with dehorning as we do not have chute that year till we brought a chute four years ago. The reason why he is isolated from the herd is because we have to wean him and makes sure he don't get any infections from dehorning. Pretty sure he was stressed out from dehorning and all things going on around him, judging from his body condition and weight loss.

Dude, you're out classed. Cattlemen don't speak in these terms.

I said there were more horned bulls. You said "commercial cattlemen" don't want horned bulls. You're wrong.

Dehorning is elementary for cattleman;not a task that takes an experienced cattlemen. Cattleman find the measures you took as unnecessary. If he was stressed, it was bc he was isolated, not bc of the dehorning.

Without a chute, rope him and tie his head to a post. Surely, a cattleman such as yourself can rope?
Ok..........just let you know that I'm deaf so I don't use English but my family and my grandparents are commerical cattlemen and I'm still building a good facilities on the new ranch land. Not mentioned that it was 8 years ago when we had that horned calf. Also I don't think I ever seen any horned bulls in the commerical herds around here.

Pretty sure he was stressed out because of dehorning. Otherwise if he do not have any horns, this will never happened to him.
 

Taurus

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Massey135":1w9keacp said:
Red Bull Breeder":1w9keacp said:
It would depend on what part of the country you are in. Out west you would likely see more horned than polled.

They is a little more to dehorning than ole Massey thinks. I have seen a few bleed to death.
You look it up and realize your last post was wrong? :cboy:

I've dehorned a lot of cows, BB - I'm sure you have too. Most cattle are unaffected especially calves. I'v only had a couple cases of flystrike ever and iv never had any problems just turning em out.
The cows you're talking bout shoulda never been dehorned.
So some cows shoulda never been dehorned but its okay for other cows to be dehorned?

I've seen cattle of all ages and breeds (included longhorns, rodeo bucking bulls, buffaloes and Holsteins) get dehorned and they are still at risk for bleeding to death or infections.
 

TexasBred

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Massey135":c1fs2cp4 said:
Red Bull Breeder":c1fs2cp4 said:
It would depend on what part of the country you are in. Out west you would likely see more horned than polled.

They is a little more to dehorning than ole Massey thinks. I have seen a few bleed to death.
You look it up and realize your last post was wrong? :cboy:

I've dehorned a lot of cows, BB - I'm sure you have too. Most cattle are unaffected especially calves. I'v only had a couple cases of flystrike ever and iv never had any problems just turning em out.
The cows you're talking bout shoulda never been dehorned.


Why not??
 
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Massey135

Massey135

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I've dehorned them of all sizes. Obviously the bigger the hole you leave in their head, the more at risk they are. Dehorned some brahman/holsteins cross cows that looked like I could run a 3" pipe through their head. Those cows prolly shouldn't have been dehorned.
 

chippie

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Massey135":1ft9yr5k said:
I've cut off hereford cows horns as big as my arm with keystones and they'd go out and breed back a month early.

You must have awfully tiny arms.
shocked.gif
 

Isomade

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Did you really just tell someone that cattlemen don't talk ascertain way then use the term "out classed" on a cattle forum? :lol:
 

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