cows calving -- for newbies -- pictures

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glacierridge

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Smells good to my brother's moron of a dog. He's disgusting when it comes to it. He's already dragged out after birth that was frozen in a pile of poop for months until it thawed.
Yuck!!!!
He will find it if it's around, he's a digger for it too.

Tried to stop him, can't be broke.

You just make sure he don't lick you. Bleh!!!!
 

CKC1586

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Alan":t59q2d0m said:
Dr. Lee":t59q2d0m said:
Hi milkmaid

Can I use one of your pictures for an article in the Georgia Cattlemen's magazine?

Dr. Lee

Oh oh, Milkmaid could be famous, does she need to get a bigger hat? :lol2: :lol2: .

Dr. Lee, you may have better luck getting a response from her by sending her a "private message", if you haven't already. This is a pretty old posting that never moves from the top..... She's posted some great and very helpful stuff that is now a permanent fixture on CT.

Alan
Yes, busy gal. She is in Vet school.
 

milso47

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i believe giraffe's always stand while birthing[/quote]


They do and then the mother kicks it across the grass til it gets up and starts moving. no time to be laying around on the Serengeti
 

kenny thomas

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Grundy53":2kdpje32 said:
I understand there are a lot of variables such as age and breed. But on average how frequently do you end up having to pull a calf?
I haven't pulled a calf in 15 years or more. I calved around 100 cows a year till recently but still about 40. Mostly to Charolais bulls now. Even the heifers.
 

farmerjan

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I pulled a calf from a big brown swiss heifer a couple of years ago. She was a wimp because it was an angus sired calf and didn't weigh75 lbs., normal presentation, she just acted like it was killing her. A real wuss!!!!! The calf I helped before that was backwards, half out, and was hiplocked; and as soon as we got her in the chute twisted it around and it came right out. Saved calf and cow did a good job of raising it. Her 2nd or 3rd calf. Out of 175 to 200 beef cows a year, we may pull one about every 5 years and it is 99% because they are back feet first. And , it is usually because we see it, want to get it out before we lose the calf.
 

Son of Butch

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Most Newbies natural inclination is to want to assist in delivery as soon as the front feet appear. Don't do it.

Wait and observe. Allow the natural process to proceed, cows often pause for a few minutes while calving.
Cows will pause again after the calf's rib cage appears and the calf takes it's first breath, the calf is not stuck.
An important thing is happening. At this point the cow pauses and the placenta transfers it's blood supply, about one
pint, to the calf. This helps ensure a thrifty calf and later helps to expel the placenta.

As long as everything is progressing naturally and the calf is in the proper position with no signs of distress from the
calf or cow, let it be. IF you do have to help, after the calf is out, set the calf up on it's sternum with front legs tucked
under to help make breathing easier for the calf and get out of the way.
 

Double R Ranch

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chaneysranch said:

First calf this season Jersey Dam, Hereford Sire. Big bull calf had to give a little help! Shoulders were holding him back. My mentor told me how to pull, did it myself.

Well done!! Congratulations!
 

farmerjan

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Glad that you were able to be of assistance, and that all turned out well. One thing, as you found out, herefords tend to have bigger heads and shoulders and that is where there is a problem with most of the crossbreeding with say the jersey. I don't like to use a hereford on a jersey or on most first calf heifers for that reason.
Good luck with the cow and calf. Are you going to milk her and let the calf nurse? She ought to give you plenty of milk so that you can raise another calf off her too.
 

ksmit454

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This is my Hereford cow, 265 days bred. Started showing signs of springing, and bagging. Slight discharge yesterday, and today. Just to show the beef cattle side of calving signs.
 

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ksmit454

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UPDATE. Calved at 171 days. I have added pics of what the mucus plug looks like. Of course I missed her calve by probably an hour!! It’s a Bull calf.
 

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