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D.R. Cattle

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My cattle are pretty accustomed to the 4 wheelers. We use them for moving bunks and all sorts of things. I just can't get that dang 4 wheeler to spin a 180 very quick when a cow decides to challenge me. Old habits die hard I guess.
 

dun

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I don't have that good of a memory. But it doesn't usually go along with "crotchity old"

dun


sam":tac3vb57 said:
dun, when was the last time you were called a young feller.
 

dun

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I know it's hard to believe but in the middle of the night that's about all there is to do.
This whole horse thing brought back some old memorys. In the rough canyons of the Mojave a horse was really the only practical way of getting things done. Had to cover many miles and most of it so rough and or steep and or sandy that nothing else really could do the job.
Along the CA-MEX boarder it's pretty much the same, but a pickup is probably a better choice over all, but a horse for backup isn't a bad idea. In this area an ATV or pickup is far more appropriate. Tough to rope from, but I never was much of a hand with a rope. When I need to do it here I rope from the ground and snub it to a tree/post/vehicle. I'm getting to stiff to be climbing on and off a horse anymore anyway.
It boils down to the same kind of deal as cattle breeds. Brahman influence isn't needed in this area and 1300 lb and above cattle won't make it on fescue. Don't need the longer legged cattle here that are imperative in the Mojave or for that matter any marginal range country with sparse water sources.
It's all what is required for the area. I have a neigbor with a herd of registered Santa Gertrudis and a couple others with Brangus. They get docked at sale time, but they're resigned to it, they happen to like those breeds. Have one neighbor with around 400 limousine, they're nutty as can be, but about the only thing he does with them is turn out the bull, bring the bull out, and wean calves. Works for him so it must be right.
Sorry to babble

dun
 

BLACKPOWER

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Horses even in western Nebraska are a dying "hobby". First I don't have to catch my four wheeler, i don't have to saddle it, and if I get bucked off of it it's my own fault. Some of my friends ride horses and I have the pairs sorted out, ran in the corral before they get down to the pasture. Then the first time a cow doesn't go the right way for them they are swinging a stupid rope. I say you can rope your own cattle but i'll tell you to go to XXX if you throw one at mine, this is called "cowboying" it's makes "wannabees" feel all warm and fuzzy inside. I been in many debates on horse vs. four wheeler, I will give the horse a slight advantage if you run cattle in the Mountains or have lot's of canyons. For 95% of all cattle operations a four wheeler does the job faster, cheaper, and safer.
 

txag

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BLACKPOWER":2t2lky8v said:
Horses even in western Nebraska are a dying "hobby". First I don't have to catch my four wheeler, i don't have to saddle it, and if I get bucked off of it it's my own fault. Some of my friends ride horses and I have the pairs sorted out, ran in the corral before they get down to the pasture. Then the first time a cow doesn't go the right way for them they are swinging a stupid rope. I say you can rope your own cattle but i'll tell you to go to XXX if you throw one at mine, this is called "cowboying" it's makes "wannabees" feel all warm and fuzzy inside. I been in many debates on horse vs. four wheeler, I will give the horse a slight advantage if you run cattle in the Mountains or have lot's of canyons. For 95% of all cattle operations a four wheeler does the job faster, cheaper, and safer.

we like to say there's a difference between a "cowboy" & a "cattleman". some cowboys are cattlemen but most of the so-called "cowboys" i know couldn't tell a cow from a bull or an angus from a charolais.
 
A

Anonymous

Horses and ATVs each have their place. But if the cattle are properly conditioned, on the relatively smaller places the vast majority of them can readily be corraled by use of range cubes a good set of lungs to yell "whoooooooooooo" . At least that's been my experience. I know that on really large ranches in the Texas hill country and in the south they of course use horses for roundup, but even there most of the cattle can be called up with those loud compressed air blow horns and cubes. And the cattle don't need to be micro-managed and "played with" every day in order for them to respond to this practice. Just do it every now and then, but give them a reward for coming up. A cousin of mine runs around 400 head of cattle in the East Texas thickets and used to always hire horsemen to round them up for spring & fall working. I showed him what I did with my cattle (admittedly a far smaller operation) and he was baffled, but he started trying it and soon thereafter he was able to do without the horsemen. But I guess there is always the oddball exception cow or bull and I have one, about which I have posted before, for which apparently only the use of horsemen and/or my 7 mm magnum will work. Best regards to all, Arnold Ziffle
 

A. delaGarza

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Even we have ATV's (POLARIS the best) is really fun to cowboy the "old way", we in Mexico still do it specially in large big farms like ours where we raise an average of 1500 heads/farm

skip":3ij60hkb said:
I hear people say that cowboying the "old way" is a dying art. We'll I watched a wonderful show on RFD-TV the other day and I watched a family, all on horseback in the blowing snow, working their cattle. I think cowboying is alive and well. Thanks to modern clothing, they did look a little more protected from the elements. From someone who lives in South Central Texas, my hat goes off to you guys.
 

Beefy

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We have somewhere between 200 and 400 brood cows at any given time but the only time we practice rotational grazing ( and its not even that really, its just running cows out everyday to reduce trampling and bedding) is for winter annuals. Anyway, all i have to do is ride into the pasture and go to the back of it, stop, and rev the engine a couple of times and the cows go out. they dont flee, they just walk out and these fields range in size from 10 acres to 100 acres. cows are creatures of habit. i'm going to have to go with a four-wheeler on this one. I have a Honda 300 fourtrax, it will be 14 years old this Christmas and the battery died once. thats the only problem ive ever had with it other than the stupid horses eating the seat. it has been invaluable
 
OP
S

skip

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Wow! I posted the note about respecting those people working their cattle on horseback in the blowing snow. I've enjoyed the discussion about the horse vs. the engine. I'm sure it's a case of different strokes for different folks. I just thought I would let you know I can't take sides on this issue. We use an "electric" golf cart to move our cattle. It's quiet, starts every time, doesn't stink with fumes, hauls 200 lbs. of cubes, has a drink holder, cheaply recharges every night and as of yet, I haven't been thrown one time.
 

D.R. Cattle

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Hey Skip, I can't make up my mind about gettin one of those EZ-Go Utility deals or just getting a Polaris Ranger. How long does the battery hold out? How much power does it have. Polaris Ranger is fast which was the biggest problem with the others (too slow). How's the battery deal?
 

Ellie May

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Man you guys must have some wild cattle. All we have to do is get a bucket-doesn't even have to be full of grain, holler soooooooook. They come a runnin'. We occasionally bring out the horses or 4-wheeler. I say why not use them together anybody ever think of that??? DUH!! :roll: We do! I ride the horse & noramlly the cows do fine, then the 4-wheeler brings up the rear. I tend to stick with the horse. It's more peaceful & you don't have to worry if your horse will start or not. :lol:
Ellie May


:cboy:
 

dun

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Do you tie the 4 wheeler to the cows tails so they can drag it? When one person is doing the job, which is normal, I'm too old to be in two or more places at once.
I yell AAAOOOOOOOO and wave a white stick then run to get out of the way.

dun



Ellie May":2ct0u7la said:
Man you guys must have some wild cattle. All we have to do is get a bucket-doesn't even have to be full of grain, holler soooooooook. They come a runnin'. We occasionally bring out the horses or 4-wheeler. I say why not use them together anybody ever think of that??? DUH!! :roll: We do! I ride the horse & noramlly the cows do fine, then the 4-wheeler brings up the rear. I tend to stick with the horse. It's more peaceful & you don't have to worry if your horse will start or not. :lol:
Ellie May


:cboy:
 
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skip

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D.R. Cattle":1fg1gb6h said:
Hey Skip, I can't make up my mind about gettin one of those EZ-Go Utility deals or just getting a Polaris Ranger. How long does the battery hold out? How much power does it have. Polaris Ranger is fast which was the biggest problem with the others (too slow). How's the battery deal?

As far as the power of the 48 volt system, we have no complaints. It's speed is just like the carts you rent at golf courses. We bought our 2001 cart in October with 2 yr old batteries. They lasted until last week. We just put a new set of 6-8volt batteries in the cart ($400). I've got friends that have had carts longer tell me that theirs last 3+ years if they are properly maintained. Those electric utility vehicles probably have a more powerful electric motor. We just could not justify the cost. Our used cart with the added back seat / shelf and the lift kit with the all-terrain tires was $2900. We only have 134 acres so it does a great job for us. My family like it alot because they can ride around and see the wildlife without the noise scaring them off.
 

BLACKPOWER

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Ellie May":3lhsuh65 said:
Man you guys must have some wild cattle. All we have to do is get a bucket-doesn't even have to be full of grain, holler soooooooook. They come a runnin'. We occasionally bring out the horses or 4-wheeler. I say why not use them together anybody ever think of that??? DUH!! :roll: We do! I ride the horse & noramlly the cows do fine, then the 4-wheeler brings up the rear. I tend to stick with the horse. It's more peaceful & you don't have to worry if your horse will start or not. :lol:
Ellie May


:cboy:

Come out to my house and try to round up cattle on my 3500 acre pasture on foot. On second thought, no don't come to my house it's hard to get the goat smell out of the house.
 

BLACKPOWER

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Ellie May":gg4fomee said:
well I would rather smell a goat then a stink old man anyways. Yeah men have distinct smells too. Especially ones with bitter mouths!
Ellie May

Gee yer speshul.
 

Oldtimer

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I've enjoyed your discussions on horses, 4 wheelers and other cattle herding tecniques. One thing I was going to mention was that many of the Federal (BLM, Forest Service) and state grazing permits are restricting more and more the use of vehicles off trail. Many will not allow a vehicle off a road unless emergencies. Only option then is a horse.

Ellie May- I don't think shaking a grain bucket will work in our area- if not a horse, then you better have an airplane or helicopter. Pasture next to our homeplace is over 10,000 acres. Take a lot of walking with a grain bucket.
 

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