• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Cow Signs

A

Anonymous

Guest
Thought I would start a new thread with this one.

We don't have a bull, we use my Grandpa's bull or we AI. However, one of my cows is acting the same way as some of the bull stories in that thread. Once, she had me backed in a corner with her head lowered and she scratched at the ground if I even tried to move. I had to just hold still until she calmed down and moved away. Once she even kicked me with her back leg. I wasn't behind her, but right next to her and she took off running and kicked me. I was told she was just a bit skittish from having had her shots and been AI. But, I kind of think she is just an onery cow. Is it worth keeping a cow like this, or would it be better off in my freezer? I am quite a beginner, and have much to learn. I'll tell you one thing, it isn't as easy as you think to raise a few head of beef.

rwhite

[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I'd get rid of her. Cows can be just as dangerous as bulls and can hurt you just as badly. Consider what the inconvenience alone would be if you were laid up with a broken leg, not to mention medical bills, etc. Don't take the chance. Good luck...

> Thought I would start a new thread
> with this one.

> We don't have a bull, we use my
> Grandpa's bull or we AI. However,
> one of my cows is acting the same
> way as some of the bull stories in
> that thread. Once, she had me
> backed in a corner with her head
> lowered and she scratched at the
> ground if I even tried to move. I
> had to just hold still until she
> calmed down and moved away. Once
> she even kicked me with her back
> leg. I wasn't behind her, but
> right next to her and she took off
> running and kicked me. I was told
> she was just a bit skittish from
> having had her shots and been AI.
> But, I kind of think she is just
> an onery cow. Is it worth keeping
> a cow like this, or would it be
> better off in my freezer? I am
> quite a beginner, and have much to
> learn. I'll tell you one thing, it
> isn't as easy as you think to
> raise a few head of beef.

> rwhite
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
When we got Granny she had a couple day old calf at side and would shake her head and paw the dirt. I found that the head shake was one thing, the dirt pawing was another. She only did that when a dog was around. If a dog got close she'ld try to kill it, if it kept it's distance she would run it down, then try to kill it. A neighbor turned loose his emus when he started loosing his...... on them. One got in the pasture and had the cows terrified, they look so goofy and alien when they run. I tried to herd it out, yeah right, doesn't work. I finally shot it and drug it out of the pasture. Granny now thinks I'm just a grand guy, she'll eat cubes out of our hands, but if you try to pet her she will step away and shake her head and blow snot. When we run her through the chute she will stop with her head just through the catch and wait to have it closed. She has given us some great heifers over the years (she slipped her calf this year so she'll be growing wheels shortly, but she's been the matriarch of the herd and just a darn good cow. With bulls, dominance is the key issue, with cows they seem to have room for another co-dominant being. If she actaully does anything agressive shoot her or ship her. If she's new to the place and you, give her a bit of time to see if she comes around, but don't let her see that your intimidated. The only time I had to do anything with granny was after her first calf here and she didn't want me near it. I yelled at her to knock off the crap (tone of voice) and she settled right down. Of course I kept the calf between her and me. Now when she calves I can go out and sit fairly close to her and she just goes ahead and does her thing. What I'm getting at is cows and bulls are different. Yes, agression can get you hurt(killed) but cows don;t seem to alwasy be on the prod and looking for something to play with or beat the crap out of. Let her get used to you and see if she comes around. I tend to give cows a bit more latitude, I won't let a bull have an inch, I'm just a softy for the ladies.

dun

> I'd get rid of her. Cows can be
> just as dangerous as bulls and can
> hurt you just as badly. Consider
> what the inconvenience alone would
> be if you were laid up with a
> broken leg, not to mention medical
> bills, etc. Don't take the chance.
> Good luck...



[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hindsight is 2020. Without going into all the details we kept a cow for 2 years thinking "she will come around". Now we realize we should have shot her before she was unloaded that first day and scratch our heads why we didn't shoot her at the end of that first day. We thought "well let her get adjusted", then "she will calm after her first calf", then "well she will calm with age". Nope it never happened. Even the meat was the worst we ever raised, (but then we got her with intentions to breed and produce beef calves, not to be beef so..... I can excuse he on that one.) The point is give her some time. Look around for what may be spooking her or setting her off, but do not get trapped thinking "well I have this much into her and she will come around when _______". There are some cows just not worth putting up with. Also beware of the good cow bad cow syndrome. She only kicks once a week etc. Yea, that is a smart kicking cow, one that only kicks when she thinks she has a good chance of getting you and eventually get you she will. (The horror story cow went months once without a single kick, my dad had even started petting her, she had finally come around. That was right before she gave him the worst kick he ever got in his life. Literally flipped him over in the air, across the gutter and barn floor and into his bed for a couple days.) There are too many good cows out there to waste your time on a trouble one. Thanks, Rick

> Thought I would start a new thread
> with this one.

> We don't have a bull, we use my
> Grandpa's bull or we AI. However,
> one of my cows is acting the same
> way as some of the bull stories in
> that thread. Once, she had me
> backed in a corner with her head
> lowered and she scratched at the
> ground if I even tried to move. I
> had to just hold still until she
> calmed down and moved away. Once
> she even kicked me with her back
> leg. I wasn't behind her, but
> right next to her and she took off
> running and kicked me. I was told
> she was just a bit skittish from
> having had her shots and been AI.
> But, I kind of think she is just
> an onery cow. Is it worth keeping
> a cow like this, or would it be
> better off in my freezer? I am
> quite a beginner, and have much to
> learn. I'll tell you one thing, it
> isn't as easy as you think to
> raise a few head of beef.

> rwhite



[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Don't ever think that keeping the calf between you and the cow will protect you. The worst wreck we've ever had on this place was when a big black baldie with a touch of ear knocked her calf down to get at the cowboy who had hold of him. She stomped him pretty good, took her calf off, made sure he was OK and came back and knocked the guy down again and stomped him some more. He had a definite cow footprint on his shin below one knee, two on his chest, and one on his face. The one on his face laid open his cheek about four inches. He had broken ribs and the ER docs thought his spleen might be ruptured. Thankfully it was not, but breathing was difficult for several weeks until the ribs healed. If the cow had horns, she might well have killed him. I wouldn't have a cow that won't take care of her calf, but ours are all weighed within 24 hours of birth. If we can't do that, she needs to go somewhere else to live (or be hamburger). They're wonderful critters, but they're not pets.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
i had the same experience....luckily not as bad as the one described. we had a polled hereford w/a newborn. i had grabbed the calf to tattoo it when i just got a feeling that she wasn't too happy with me. no snort or any warning, just a feeling a got. i let go of the calf about the same time she caught me in the stomach w/her head. i don't really know all the specifics of the incident....everything kind of blurred...but she ended up jumping over the four-wheeler and i had lost a shoe and had a really swollen ankle & i thought a broken nose. this was not her first calf (i think 3rd) & she hadn't shown signs of aggression before. we let her raise the calf to weaning & then she grew wheels. too many good cows to put up w/that.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I hate being around them but i've seen that in most cases the onryst cows always seem to raise the best calves. When she's raising 750lbers i can put up with a little snortin and pissin around. If not then good bye.

[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I've never had a cow that would come through her calf to get to me. Just goes to show even olde pharts can get too complacent

dun

> Don't ever think that keeping the
> calf between you and the cow will
> protect you. The worst wreck we've
> ever had on this place was when a
> big black baldie with a touch of
> ear knocked her calf down to get
> at the cowboy who had hold of him.
> She stomped him pretty good, took
> her calf off, made sure he was OK
> and came back and knocked the guy
> down again and stomped him some
> more. He had a definite cow
> footprint on his shin below one
> knee, two on his chest, and one on
> his face. The one on his face laid
> open his cheek about four inches.
> He had broken ribs and the ER docs
> thought his spleen might be
> ruptured. Thankfully it was not,
> but breathing was difficult for
> several weeks until the ribs
> healed. If the cow had horns, she
> might well have killed him. I
> wouldn't have a cow that won't
> take care of her calf, but ours
> are all weighed within 24 hours of
> birth. If we can't do that, she
> needs to go somewhere else to live
> (or be hamburger). They're
> wonderful critters, but they're
> not pets.



[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
If you cannot safely handle the calf then momma needs to disappear before the next calving season. We cannot afford to have an aggressive cow around with the neighbors kids and neice's and nephews. Dad is not able to move to fast anymore so any cow that is a snot disappears.

pat
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
> I wouldn't have a cow that won't
> take care of her calf, but ours
> are all weighed within 24 hours of
> birth. If we can't do that, she
> needs to go somewhere else to live
> (or be hamburger). They're
> wonderful critters, but they're
> not pets.

Being a beginner I am having trouble with this one. I am cautious around my cows, but have only been able to get near one without mama stepping up to it and taking it away. Does this mean I should ship all my cows? I have to believe that there is some learning curve here on how to do it correctly, and have a good idea of what that cows is going to do, but I am not getting it. Am I making things worse by locking mama up (yes it is days later) in the pen and tending to the calf?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Why do you want to get hold of the small calves? Did you buy the cows this year? Our experience has been that "flighty" cows tend to calm down as calves get older and the cows get used to us feeding them. They become more comfortable with having us around and the calves get more independent. Recognizing cows that will hurt you is a learning situation and I don't think anyone can give you a formula for being safe. Just don't think that keeping the calf between you and the cow will make you safe. I don't believe that you'll make things worse by separating the cows and handling the calves. The cows may take the calves and leave after they're turned out, but if you're feeding them, they'll be back to eat. Be careful and good luck...

> Being a beginner I am having
> trouble with this one. I am
> cautious around my cows, but have
> only been able to get near one
> without mama stepping up to it and
> taking it away. Does this mean I
> should ship all my cows? I have to
> believe that there is some
> learning curve here on how to do
> it correctly, and have a good idea
> of what that cows is going to do,
> but I am not getting it. Am I
> making things worse by locking
> mama up (yes it is days later) in
> the pen and tending to the calf?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
The only reason I want/need to get to a newborn calf is to tag or treat them. It is really not a problem right now since I have so few I can keep track of them until they get older and I can get mama in the pen. But if I had to treat one I would be in trouble I think. I hear alot about people that dip the cord, give vitamins, etc but I guess they are doing ok without it.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Unless you have a bunch of calves all born in a day or two, most cows will calm down by then. If they don't the need to grow wheels. Problem can sometimes be catching the calves once they get a couple of days on them. Surprising how fast they can run, also surprising how fast a calm easy going cow can get nasty when her calf takes off running and you're chasing her. If we need to catch them then, we wait till they're asleep and sneak up on them. We hardly ever go near a calf till they go through the chute for the first time at about a month old. By then you can pretty well tell whos belongs to who. If you happen to get a tag wrong, no big deal. Keep track of it and change the tag the next time you work them. Even thogh the majority of our calves are red (the red and white ones are easy to tell) you can start to recognize each calf by the look of it. The important part is to know your cows and hopefully have them know you.

dun

> The only reason I want/need to get
> to a newborn calf is to tag or
> treat them. It is really not a
> problem right now since I have so
> few I can keep track of them until
> they get older and I can get mama
> in the pen. But if I had to treat
> one I would be in trouble I think.
> I hear alot about people that dip
> the cord, give vitamins, etc but I
> guess they are doing ok without
> it.



[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
> Thought I would start a new thread
> with this one.

> We don't have a bull, we use my
> Grandpa's bull or we AI. However,
> one of my cows is acting the same
> way as some of the bull stories in
> that thread. Once, she had me
> backed in a corner with her head
> lowered and she scratched at the
> ground if I even tried to move. I
> had to just hold still until she
> calmed down and moved away. Once
> she even kicked me with her back
> leg. I wasn't behind her, but
> right next to her and she took off
> running and kicked me. I was told
> she was just a bit skittish from
> having had her shots and been AI.
> But, I kind of think she is just
> an onery cow. Is it worth keeping
> a cow like this, or would it be
> better off in my freezer? I am
> quite a beginner, and have much to
> learn. I'll tell you one thing, it
> isn't as easy as you think to
> raise a few head of beef.

> rwhite

Hi there. Well, sounds like you're getting a lot of good advice, thought I might add something. We have a commercial beef herd, and although we try very hard to only keep the cows with half decent temperments (pretty hard to raise a family and make a living if a foul minded cow puts you on the wrong side of the daisies), I don't trust any cow as far as I could toss her, especially during calving season. Too many people have been badly hurt because good ol' Bess' protective mothering instinct kicks in after they've calved her out for years. Personally, we carry a pitchfork with us when we check the cows during calving season, and during processing (tagging, banding and initial shots). I know it sounds absolutely brutal, but it has saved my life on at least two occasions. A person doesn't have to be mean with it, but when a cow tries to knock you down, all you need to do it just hold it steady, and once she pricks her nose on the tines, she seems to have enough respect to back off a few feet and think the matter over. She might be pretty ticked still, bellowing, blowing snot and raking the ground, but at least she isn't making you into this week's funeral announcement in the local paper. Yes, I know there's going to be folks who condemn me for this, but 1500 lbs of raging maternal hormones and instinct are nothing to fool with...especially when you've got to survive 200+ head of them calving every year and still be able to see your kids graduate. Point of my rambling tale is sometimes being the one with the bigger horns means being able to leave the barnyard in one piece. Good luck and be safe.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
we try to catch all the calves within a day or two of birth (usually after that they're uncatchable until penned). we weigh, tattoo & tag the registered calves, tag the crossbred calves & band the crossbred bull calves.

if you only have a few cows (& don't need birthweights for performace data) and can keep up with the calves, then there shouldn't really be a need to catch them early. separating them from mama is probably the safest way to go.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Back many years ago when we ran enough to not be able to tell who wss who, they calved in the canyons (350 acres per pair) so we didn't even try to figure out who belonged to who until they came in to be cut, branded, weaned, etc. I'm really glad now that I'm old enough (maybe too old) that we don;t have to run that many cows anymore. A couple of dozen is plenty, and I have a hard time keeping up with that few at times.

dun

> we try to catch all the calves
> within a day or two of birth
> (usually after that they're
> uncatchable until penned). we
> weigh, tattoo & tag the
> registered calves, tag the
> crossbred calves & band the
> crossbred bull calves.

> if you only have a few cows (&
> don't need birthweights for
> performace data) and can keep up
> with the calves, then there
> shouldn't really be a need to
> catch them early. separating them
> from mama is probably the safest
> way to go.



[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
we have a lease place of 300 acres and about 200 of it is brush. about half of these cows are baldies or brangus-type who like to think they're smart & hide out when they're calving. sometimes we don't see the babies until they're about a week old when mama thinks they're old enough to outrun us (& she's right).
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
350 acres for a pair. WOW. The horses and cattlemen earned their keep then. I am in Florida and have never been West of the Miss. Hard for me to imagine expanses like that.

> Back many years ago when we ran
> enough to not be able to tell who
> wss who, they calved in the
> canyons (350 acres per pair) so we
> didn't even try to figure out who
> belonged to who until they came in
> to be cut, branded, weaned, etc.
> I'm really glad now that I'm old
> enough (maybe too old) that we
> don;t have to run that many cows
> anymore. A couple of dozen is
> plenty, and I have a hard time
> keeping up with that few at times.

> dun
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
It isn't all that bad, some of it runs only 300 acres per pair.

dun

> 350 acres for a pair. WOW. The
> horses and cattlemen earned their
> keep then. I am in Florida and
> have never been West of the Miss.
> Hard for me to imagine expanses
> like that.



[email protected]
 
Top