Cow has "crossed toes"?

Help Support CattleToday:

OklaBrangusBreeder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2005
Messages
347
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Oklahoma
So I've got a cow that I noticed being gimpy the last few days. When I go watch her walk, she is quick stepping one of her rear feet. Looking closer, it appears to me that her toes on one back foot are trying to "cross" when she walks. I don't see that happening on her other feet.

Anybody have any insight regarding this issue? Any treatment plan ideas?

Thanks in advance...!
 

WarEagle73

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 12, 2012
Messages
165
Reaction score
5
Location
North Alabama
Sounds like what I have always heard called "screw claw". Not to hijack your thread, but anyone know if this is a heritable trait? If it were to happen to a young cow thats one thing, but I can imagine a situation where my best cow develops it at 13 or 14 years old and I have 5 of her daughters in production before I know she has a defect.
 

3waycross

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Messages
14,467
Reaction score
26
Location
Colorado
WarEagle73":1f17njrw said:
Sounds like what I have always heard called "screw claw". Not to hijack your thread, but anyone know if this is a heritable trait? If it were to happen to a young cow thats one thing, but I can imagine a situation where my best cow develops it at 13 or 14 years old and I have 5 of her daughters in production before I know she has a defect.


If she doesn't develope it until she is 14 you are probably in good shape! and yes it's supposed to be heritable.
 

ranchmom77

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Messages
76
Reaction score
0
Location
God's country - Montana
Yes it is heritable. The very first heifer my DH kept when he was just starting out developed this and when he took her to the vet to have her trimmed she told him that it was heritable and not to keep any replacements. Luckily he had only kept one of her heifer calves over the years, but it's since been sold. He takes her to the vet every year after she calves for her "pedicure.' LOL
He knows he should have sold her, and he might yet if we have to cull because the hay doesn't grow this summer, but he always says that she raises such a good calf that its worth the yearly pedicure.
Personally, I think (know) that he keeps her purely for sentimental reasons as she was his start, so I don't rile him too much about it. She's getting older now anyways and she's the lead cow that we always put with the heifers on summer pasture. Makes moving them SOOO much easier because she knows exactly where she's going and the youngsters are happy to follow her. Her toes don't get long until winter and she doesn't do much traveling then anyways so its not too much of a problem for her.
 

inyati13

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 17, 2011
Messages
6,707
Reaction score
1
Location
Kentucky, Outer Bluegrass
I too would like to see a picture. Here is why. I have about the same issue just starting. One of my cows needs her front hooves trimmed. They are starting to cross at the front tip. But the vet has seen them and said it is definitely not screw claw. Your cow may just need to be trimmed. But nevertheless, if you have a cow whose feet are going to be a chronic problem you have to consider what dun is suggesting which is what I am doing. I am a student of the concept that form and function are the result of inheritance. My mom and dad lived to be 90 (mom is still going), as I approach my senior years, I see more and more of their defects showing up in me. My hands are now beginning to get the same knots and turns to them that dad had. I remember looking at his index finger when he would point it. Mine now looks almost identical to his. The point is that if you have a cow that harbors bad feet, chances are better than even that her offspring will perpetuate that ill.
 
OP
O

OklaBrangusBreeder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2005
Messages
347
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Oklahoma
I would post a picture, but I think I may have misdiagnosed the issue...

Yesterday I took another look at the cow and the toes appeared "normal" as she walked. Perhaps she is putting a little more weight on that foot and the toes are now staying straighter? The cow still has a noticeable "quick step" from avoiding her back right leg, but I don't see it as a toe issue. Looking now more like a simple sprain that appears to be improving daily.

Still, good discussion and perhaps useful for future reference...
 

3waycross

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Messages
14,467
Reaction score
26
Location
Colorado
OklaBrangusBreeder":374cj3hk said:
I would post a picture, but I think I may have misdiagnosed the issue...

Yesterday I took another look at the cow and the toes appeared "normal" as she walked. Perhaps she is putting a little more weight on that foot and the toes are now staying straighter? The cow still has a noticeable "quick step" from avoiding her back right leg, but I don't see it as a toe issue. Looking now more like a simple sprain that appears to be improving daily.

Still, good discussion and perhaps useful for future reference...

She could be stifled. She in with a big heavy bull?
 

faster horses

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
256
Reaction score
320
Weak pasterns can cause the toes to cross due to the pressure on the heel. The front of the foot tends to not stay flat which causes the problem. Good luck. (Old thread I know.)
 

TCRanch

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
5,960
Reaction score
1,984
Location
Winfield, KS
Weak pasterns can cause the toes to cross due to the pressure on the heel. The front of the foot tends to not stay flat which causes the problem. Good luck. (Old thread I know.)
Old thread, but timely. I have an 8 year old cow that started getting "crossed toes" in her front feet last year. Got her in & trimmed one foot with yard loppers last spring. Bought a heavy duty hoof nipper over the summer and trimmed the other foot (which wasn't bad last spring) a couple days ago when I weaned. Gotta say, the yard loppers worked better & was easier to use. I've only kept one of her heifers, now 6 years old, and her feet are perfect. So far.
 

Latest posts

Top