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Brute 23

Brute 23
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Here you go Brute.
This was my only post on price of monoclonal drug pricing.... $2100 from manufacturer that Trump received.
Sooo... it's not $2100. From what I was told different people can get different amounts due to age and risk and what not but I'm not sure how you could run up $2100 unless that's a special insurance/ govt price. It's not uncommon for things to be significantly cheaper when paying cash and keeping the govt out of it.

The time varies with each patient maybe because of how fast each person's body can take the iv? Maybe some one who does medical stuff can verify that. Mine took less than 10 min.

The staying after is insurance and liability stuff from what I was told also. If you get a shot or some thing it may be necessary but I was told with the iv since it's going right in the blood stream you would have a reaction before it even finished.

All this nonsense about pricing, and time to administer, and staying and blah blah blah is all red tape and people covering their own butt.

You and your buddies on here keep going after those of us who dont want to drink the koolaid and yall are the ones actually hurting people. We should all be uniting, questioning every thing, demanding actual treatments that work for every one, not fighting over links found on the enet. This blind trust is dangerous and yall are just doing big money's dirty work keeping people divided.

Rather than forcing vaccines and demonizing people who dont want it let's set up more places that can do the infusion as soon as some one tests positive. That's the american way... not turning americans on americans to push an agenda.
 

faster horses

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We got the infusion. It took 30 minutes from start to finish and then we had to wait an hour before we could leave. About 3 hours later I thought Mr FH was having a reaction because he was running a fever of 102. None of the phones in town worked, I could not call dr., clinic, hospital, walk in clinic or pharmacy. So I took him back to town. He had 103 temperature by then. They checked him over and gave him 2 iboprofen, and told me to alternate it with 2 Tylenol every 2 hours. We got his fever down. It still took him 2 weeks to feel better. His brother was here to day and he had the infusion a day before we did, (we were exposed at the same time) and he thinks it didn't do him or his wife any good at all.
My response was, "but you don't know how bad it would have been without it." That was one of the reasons to get the infusion, so the virus wouldn't get worse and cause hospitalization.
We all got over it, worried about the other brother. It seems to have affected him mentally. I hope that is caused by RA meds he takes and not from Covid. Maybe it's from both.
 

Son of Butch

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Sooo... it's not $2100. From what I was told different people can get different amounts due to age and risk and what not but I'm not sure how you could run up $2100 unless that's a special insurance/ govt price. It's not uncommon for things to be significantly cheaper when paying cash and keeping the govt out of it.

The time varies with each patient maybe because of how fast each person's body can take the iv? Maybe some one who does medical stuff can verify that. Mine took less than 10 min.

The staying after is insurance and liability stuff from what I was told also. If you get a shot or some thing it may be necessary but I was told with the iv since it's going right in the blood stream you would have a reaction before it even finished.

All this nonsense about pricing, and time to administer, and staying and blah blah blah is all red tape and people covering their own butt.

You and your buddies on here keep going after those of us who dont want to drink the koolaid and yall are the ones actually hurting people. We should all be uniting, questioning every thing, demanding actual treatments that work for every one, not fighting over links found on the enet. This blind trust is dangerous and yall are just doing big money's dirty work keeping people divided.

Rather than forcing vaccines and demonizing people who dont want it let's set up more places that can do the infusion as soon as some one tests positive. That's the american way... not turning americans on americans to push an agenda.
$2100 per dose is what the drug manufacturer charges the government.
No such thing as a free lunch. Emergency use drugs without FDA approval, which is what monoclonal antibodies are, can only be sold to the government and then distributed at government's discretion and direction.
 
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Named'em Tamed'em

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The hospital system I work for is paying $25/hour, on top of your pay, if you pick up shifts due to covid. If you're in OT, you get your OT hourly rate + $25/hour. We are bleeding money. Not to mention the emotional toll it's taking on all of us to cover all these extra shifts, and the constant flow of patients coming in. The number of folks coming in is the through the roof right now.
My daughter is a scrub tech, she mentioned a bonus working
extra hours!
 

504RP

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Go see Dr Williamson at the Fondren group in Houston.
People fly in from all over the world to have him do back and neck surgery. I had put it off so long I was having paralysis issues on my left side. My spinal cord was compressed from 10mm to 5.
He is not cut happy he will run all the appropriate test and tell you your options the rest is up to you.

Here is some of his work.
I had a MRI done the other day that showed I have mild canal stenosis L4 - L5, among other things.

What part of your back was that X-Ray showing ?
 

Caustic Burno

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I had a MRI done the other day that showed I have mild canal stenosis L4 - L5, among other things.

What part of your back was that X-Ray showing ?
I have had multiple MRI’s Xray and Cat scans, the only thing they haven’t shot me with is a BB gun. I had 11 bad disc out of 23 in my back. The narrowing of the spinal column from 10mm to 5mm in the cervical region was causing paralysis issues.
My cervical fusion was C-4 through C-7. I have some severe low back issues as well my surgeon flat told me as long as you can take it with out surgery do it. Said low back has a 60% repeat surgery.
Am I better after surgery? You bet but it’s nowhere close to OEM.
 

Brute 23

Brute 23
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I started feeling better a couple days ago so I ventured out to the pastures close to the house, mainly because I was bored out of my mind. I tried riding the tractor a few hours to shred roads and did ok the first day. The second day I rode longer and it drained me. I was wore out the next day and didnt feel good. I'm back to resting I guess. I may venture out again to ride around but still one very light duty.
 

Hpacres440p

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Sooo... it's not $2100. From what I was told different people can get different amounts due to age and risk and what not but I'm not sure how you could run up $2100 unless that's a special insurance/ govt price. It's not uncommon for things to be significantly cheaper when paying cash and keeping the govt out of it.

The time varies with each patient maybe because of how fast each person's body can take the iv? Maybe some one who does medical stuff can verify that. Mine took less than 10 min.

The staying after is insurance and liability stuff from what I was told also. If you get a shot or some thing it may be necessary but I was told with the iv since it's going right in the blood stream you would have a reaction before it even finished.

All this nonsense about pricing, and time to administer, and staying and blah blah blah is all red tape and people covering their own butt.

You and your buddies on here keep going after those of us who dont want to drink the koolaid and yall are the ones actually hurting people. We should all be uniting, questioning every thing, demanding actual treatments that work for every one, not fighting over links found on the enet. This blind trust is dangerous and yall are just doing big money's dirty work keeping people divided.

Rather than forcing vaccines and demonizing people who dont want it let's set up more places that can do the infusion as soon as some one tests positive. That's the american way... not turning americans on americans to push an agenda.
For those who don’t know, monoclonal antibodies aren’t just “medicine”, they are produced by introducing an antigen into a mouse, allowing it to develop antibodies, and cloning the resulting cells produced by the mouse immune system as a hybrid human/mouse antibody complex. It ain’t cheap, and because there is a mouse component, there is a real potential for allergic reactions, especially in people who have exposure to mice or mouse products (feces, dust, urine), as their immune systems can react to the mouse component as an allergen. This technology is also utilized in several cancer treatments. This class of treatment has a high risk of allergic reaction in the person who is receiving the treatment as well as the initial hour after treatment (which is why you get an extended stay at hotel ER if you get the infusion). I can guarantee that there would be lawsuits from folks whose family members have a reaction on the way home, if this wasn’t monitored. Never mind that the person received a rescue treatment to prevent hospitalization. Again, vaccine cost is $88. Same purpose-prevent hospitalization, but also prevent transmissibility.
That’s simply an explanation of the medical economics, and why the mABs cost as much as they do.
 

Redgully

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For those who don’t know, monoclonal antibodies aren’t just “medicine”, they are produced by introducing an antigen into a mouse, allowing it to develop antibodies, and cloning the resulting cells produced by the mouse immune system as a hybrid human/mouse antibody complex. It ain’t cheap, and because there is a mouse component, there is a real potential for allergic reactions, especially in people who have exposure to mice or mouse products (feces, dust, urine), as their immune systems can react to the mouse component as an allergen. This technology is also utilized in several cancer treatments. This class of treatment has a high risk of allergic reaction in the person who is receiving the treatment as well as the initial hour after treatment (which is why you get an extended stay at hotel ER if you get the infusion). I can guarantee that there would be lawsuits from folks whose family members have a reaction on the way home, if this wasn’t monitored. Never mind that the person received a rescue treatment to prevent hospitalization. Again, vaccine cost is $88. Same purpose-prevent hospitalization, but also prevent transmissibility.
That’s simply an explanation of the medical economics, and why the mABs cost as much as they do.
So after the infusion do you develop an unsatisfiable taste for cheese?
 

faster horses

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I found this posted on a local fb site. It is worth reading. Draw your own conclusions. As for me, I had no idea. This was written by a nurse in a big hospital.
"I’ve been surrounded by a lot of different views of the global pandemic. I am entirely full of anger; I’ll do my best to keep all the emotions I’m personally dealing with out of these experiences and thoughts I’m about to share.
In the beginning of the pandemic, we were all scared. We didn’t know what this virus was. We didn’t know how it would affect our lives. I vividly remember the first case we thought we had in our ICU because the chest x-ray read “ground glass opacities.” We didn’t know how to protect ourselves. But time went on. Research was done as quickly as possible to figure out if it was spread via aerosolized particles, droplets, or if it was airborne. Protocols changed quickly within the hospital. Wear a mask, wear an N95… now add eye protection. Now you don’t need an N95 unless your patient is on the bipap or ventilator. Oh but now you only need an N95 if your ventilated patient has gotten an aerosolized treatment or their circuit has broken within the last 69 minutes. Things changed so rapidly because we were learning and gaining new information so quickly, while also trying to preserve resources- we weren’t prepared for this.
Now we’ve been going through this for nearly 19 months. We’ve got more N95s, more PPE, and by December 2020, we were vaccinating healthcare workers, first responders, and high risk patients. Now, you’re information overloaded. Overwhelmed by numbers, statistics, graphics of how many patients are in each hospital, and how many are covid and unvaccinated. You watch the news, you see restrictions implemented in attempts to keep others from being infected. Some see these numbers and graphics showing covid data and think we’re “trying to push an agenda.” But there’s so much more you don’t see. There’s such a limited view into the hospitals. You don’t see nurses sharing their stories, because we protect our patients’ privacy. But more and more, I’m realizing it might be our experiences that speak louder than numbers.
We do everything we can for our patients. Many patients come in short of breath, with low oxygen readings, we put them on oxygen, start medications including antivirals and steroids. But then that oxygen and medication isn’t enough. We keep turning the oxygen up, and up, and up, until we get to the point they have to wear a mask that forces air into their lungs. Soon, even that is not enough. They need to be intubated.
So Emily, RN, our charge nurse for the day, calls their family and tells them we can’t keep their oxygen up and it’s time to be intubated.
Caroline, RN hurries to the med room to grab medications to sedate and paralyze them so that our pulmonologist can intubate safely and quickly. Jessica, our respiratory therapist, grabs her RT friend Salina and they wheel in the ventilator.
Everyone dons their PPE and is ready at the patient’s bedside. Caroline pushes meds, RT handles the airway and tools necessary for intubation. Our pulmonologist intubates them. Angie, our rapid response nurse, records the events from just outside the room with the phone on speaker so she can hear inside.
After successful intubation, we put in a foley catheter, a nasogastric tube (tube in your nose or mouth down to your stomach so we can give you medications and nutrition). We get x-rays and labs. We start continuous sedation so the patient can comfortably tolerate the tube in their mouth that is anchored by a balloon in the trachea. The ventilator settings are immediately increased. When 100% oxygen isn’t keeping their oxygen levels up, we increase the pressure so that their lungs are kept open and hope for better oxygenation. Emily and Caroline hold their hand and watch the monitor hoping for their oxygen to get above 88%. When it doesn’t, the pulmonologist tells us to start the paralytic medication and flip them onto their stomach and hope that gravity helps recruit more of their lungs to oxygenate. Prone therapy is working and we are so glad to get their oxygen up into the 90s. We do this for four or five days. They’re not getting better and their blood pressure starts to drop. We start medications for this. It’s not working… their kidneys start to shut down, we start continuous dialysis.
Family comes and hangs onto every piece of hope we can offer. Each 5% decrease in the patient’s oxygen needs is a win. But it’s becoming more and more clear they won’t make it. We talk to their family- we talk about quality of life and what the patient would’ve wanted if we’d exhausted every life saving option. Their family knows they won’t want to live like this; they’ve come to realize they won’t get better. So a decision is made to turn our care from aggressive treatment to making the patient as comfortable as possible in their last hours.
Just a couple days ago, Emmy found herself taking care of Henry (name changed to protect privacy). Covid positive, unvaccinated just because he hadn’t had the time. On the ventilator, 100% oxygen. We’d tried everything. Prone, antivirals, steroids- all of it. But it was obvious he wasn’t going to recover from this. So his family came in and said their goodbyes and made the decision to make him comfortable. The family was appreciative of our care for Henry, but didn’t want to stay with him as he passed away. Respiratory therapy extubated him. Emmy, Emily, and I did what we could to make him comfortable with the morphine and ativan. Emmy held one hand, Emily had the other. I messaged the doctor back and forth to make sure we had what we needed for Henry as he took his last breaths. We stood at Henry’s bedside for minutes. We watched him take a few gasping breaths, we held his hand and turned his pillows. We made sure he wasn’t in pain. Emily and I watched tears slide down Emmy’s face and into her N95. Five minutes later, the monitor read asystole. No heartbeat. No breathing.
Henry was one of too many. Just this yesterday, we lost our patient Penny. Over the months, we’ve lost Gary, Joe, Tommy, Susan, Paulette, Chris, Carry, Richard, and so many more. (Names changed to protect privacy.)
People come to their own conclusions looking at the numbers and survival rates and brush it off. It’s not likely to affect them, so they don’t think too hard about it. Or, maybe it is too much information to process. But from my point of view, I see Henry, Susan, and Joe who didn’t deserve this.
We are so tired. Exhausted. Mentally and emotionally undone…. because we don’t see numbers. I see my patients and their family members. I see the grief and share it with them. Now, there’s a vaccine, which makes this virus preventable and/or so much more mild that patients wouldn’t need the hospital if they did get it. Some of my closest family members continue to decline to get the vaccine and I’m so frustrated and tired and angry.
I am a nurse and I will take care of my patients and be the best advocate no matter who you are or any choices you’ve made… but there’s a way to help, and that way is masking and getting the vaccine. Help us so that maybe we won’t be the one to hold your loved ones hand while they pass away. It’s an honor to be that person for these patients, but right now, it doesn’t have to be this way.
And maybe it’s not only my stories that the community needs to hear. They need to hear the stories of Kat, Sarah, Kellen, Crystal, Paige, Daniela, Katie, Kelsie, Jamie, Haley, Taylor, Sheryl, Natalie, Bre, Matt, and so many more taking care of our community during covid.
Emmy is a CIC nurse taking care of covid patients every day.
“I have participated in a minimum of 2 deaths per day in the last nine days. And one day there were five. In some of these cases, it’s not the doctor having the conversations with the families, it’s me. And somehow I’m the last person they’ll ever speak to while also being the person to listen to their heart beat the last time and tell their wife or husband “they’re gone.” Somehow I’m crying and grieving a person I never knew. Shouting in a dirty utility room. Putting myself in time out so I can walk into the next room while others live comfortably unaware.”
-Emmy, CICU RN
Conversations we have with our patients:
“Hi, my name is Emily, I’m one of the nurses caring for you. Here in a minute there are going to be a lot of people coming to your room. Your oxygen is not staying high enough anymore.”
“No honey, there’s nothing more you can do.”
“If we wait any longer, it will become an emergency and it’s better to do it now while you’re safe.”
“I’m so sorry, we can’t wait for your wife to come. There is no more time.”
“I can’t say how long you will need this.”
“I promise to do everything I can.”
“I’ll tell them you love them.”
And repeat.
Pictured: Holding onto each other particularly tight. Love these people. They’re fighting for you."
- Kadee, RN, cardiac intensive care, IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital
 

Banjo

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That was very moving.....i had a close friend like "Henry" who died about like that ...a few months after getting fully vaccinated. I have about decided that if a person isn't going to take an aggressive preventive strategy..i.e. D3, Zinc, Querctin , vitamin C and even Ivermectin.....then maybe they should just go ahead and take the vaccine.
I saw a funny cartoon ......it was two rats talking to each other and one said "Have you gotten the Covid vax?" and the other one said "No, they aren't thru testing it on humans yet".
 
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