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TennesseeTuxedo

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I suppose this is a key factor in a lot of the discussion as both sides try to convince the other that they are correct. It appears that some just don’t worry much about the well being of others in this situation, or any situation, while others have compassion and do care. I’m not trying to be sarcastic or snotty with this comment; it’s just an observation that it took me a while to realize.

It’s true that we are all going to die, there are many things out there that can kill us every day, and according to nature, someone in their 80s has fewer days on earth than someone in their 20s. That information is reality and is always tucked away in the brain. Regardless, I suppose some feel more compassion than others.
Daughter’s test was negative, granddaughter seems to have shaken it off completely, son in law feels like he’s had a bout with the flu. Thanks for asking Captain Compassion.

Oh and my mother is still locked in her room with no contact with the other “inmates”. I think she’ll be fine but the loneliness is pretty difficult to handle she says. At least she has her masks to talk to.
 

Brute 23

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Daughter’s test was negative, granddaughter seems to have shaken it off completely, son in law feels like he’s had a bout with the flu. Thanks for asking Captain Compassion.

Oh and my mother is still locked in her room with no contact with the other “inmates”. I think she’ll be fine but the loneliness is pretty difficult to handle she says. At least she has her masks to talk to.
That breaks my heart to think about that. I remember when both my grandparents were in nursing homes. The interaction was always the highlight of their day.

The radical mask nazis dont care about any one else TT. They just want to make sure they survive at all costs. They project their guilt by attacking other people. They cant see the big picture because all they are worried about is their own survival.
 

herofan

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Daughter’s test was negative, granddaughter seems to have shaken it off completely, son in law feels like he’s had a bout with the flu. Thanks for asking Captain Compassion.

Oh and my mother is still locked in her room with no contact with the other “inmates”. I think she’ll be fine but the loneliness is pretty difficult to handle she says. At least she has her masks to talk to.
You’re welcome General Tuxedo. Actually, I am glad to hear things were not bad for your family. Again, I didn’t mean that in a demeaning nature; I just think the different views cause people to see it differently.

I sometimes see a family on the news who has lost their house to fire or a tornado, but nobody was injured. They always say something like, “At least nobody was hurt. That’s all that matters. We can replace all the stuff.” They are saying if they had to give up something, they are glad it was just the house and not a family member. I’m sure that’s not an exact comparison, but I’m sure others get the idea

During the pandemic, it seems like that attitude doesn’t always prevail. It seems that some people would rather chance trading a family member as opposed to any inconveniences to their daily life. If that’s the way some people feel, I’m not going to argue it, I just feel it has a lot to do with how people view the current situation.
 

Son of Butch

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New York Times reported Meat and Poultry workers averaged 20 new cases per 100,000 people per day in December verses general population average of 63 new cases. Meat processing sector cases have dropped 800% since May peak, while general population new cases per 100,000 have increased over 300% since May.

They credit improved safety precautions at processing plants for the decline.

hmmm
Apparently immunity created by the previously high case rates at
processing plants was not factored in, as only improved precautions were
credited for the drop.

by the way:
Covid death rate of employees in meat processing sector 0.49%
I assume the low death rate would be from work force being younger in age
than the cases contracted by the general population.
 
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Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Pretty much my whole family in Rhode Island and my nephew (possibly me too) have had "it". We just celebrated Christmas this past weekend. All are healthy and active. No one got inconveniently "sick". Just like getting "the bug". Hmmm - this is "the bug".
Compassion has nothing to do with it. It is common sense. We ALL are exposed and are building immunities. It is not going away. BUILD IMMUNITY. Best defense. Get it and get over it. Yes, people die - people die of the FLU - do we shut down our lives. NO.
 

Ky hills

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Sort of sad that COMPASSION might be seen as a bad thing. "compassion - concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others"
Maybe kindness will be next to go. Or maybe already gone.
Maybe there will be a vaccine for some of those traits some day.
That is my fear as well. It seems that there is less compassion, and kindness in general these days. Its been building for a while. Businesses are getting so big and things are so impersonal and automated. The person to person interactions are definitely changing.
 

Son of Butch

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Oh and my mother is still locked in her room with no contact with the other “inmates”. I think she’ll be fine but the loneliness is pretty difficult to handle she says.
Studies have shown that loneliness causes increased physical aches and pains.

The simple act of smiling and acknowledging a lonely person with a friendly hello stimulates the pleasure centers of their brain and greatly reduces their feelings of loneliness.

Call your mother.
 

TennesseeTuxedo

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Studies have shown that loneliness causes increased physical aches and pains.

The simple act of smiling and acknowledging a lonely person with a friendly hello stimulates the pleasure centers of their brain and greatly reduces their feelings of loneliness.

Call your mother.
We speak daily SOB. I believe I mentioned that earlier. What she misses are the trivia games, the shuffleboard, boat rides when the weather is nice, gathering for happy hour, the evening meals with friends etc...
 

herofan

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Pretty much my whole family in Rhode Island and my nephew (possibly me too) have had "it". We just celebrated Christmas this past weekend. All are healthy and active. No one got inconveniently "sick". Just like getting "the bug". Hmmm - this is "the bug".
Compassion has nothing to do with it. It is common sense. We ALL are exposed and are building immunities. It is not going away. BUILD IMMUNITY. Best defense. Get it and get over it. Yes, people die - people die of the FLU - do we shut down our lives. NO.
I think compassion is involved. Everyone likes to share the stories of people they knew who got it, and it was like the common cold for thirty minutes, and then they were back in action. For those who survive but stay in the hospital for 60 days, recover but still can’t taste, smell, or exert themselves 2 months after they test negative, or die, feelings for them are less among some because to defend their view of Covid, this is where they like to jump in and act like it’s no big deal because they had a pre-existing condition or they were older.

It’s also interesting as to what people consider common sense. I remember a year or so ago when 11 people died in one season climbing Everest. Some climbers encountered dead bodies, but they continued.

I saw this discussed on another forum. A lot thought it was extreme lack of common sense and lunacy, while other adventure personalities thought it was living your life and no reason to skip that activity. It seems we are all just wired differently and function from that.
 

Lucky_P

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76Bar,
What I'm seeing in all these studies is that even though the medical authorities say that those of us who were born prior to 1957 are regarded as 'immune' to measles, mumps, rubella - either because we had the diseases, or had the earlier vaccines - the antibodies we have are not the same as those directed against the viral strains in the MMR II vaccine, and further, the immune 'memory' cells that we had may have declined to the point that they're essentially no longer there. And it looks like the antibodies directed against the strains in the MMR II vaccine are what are protective against COVID19 disease severity, though they apparently don't prevent infection.
So... recommendations are that folks over 40 yrs of age, who've not had the MMR II series, would probably benefit from getting those vaccinations.

All the 'science' suggests that it's a low-risk/high potential gain endeavor. 40 yr track record for this vaccine... any side effects are well-known. First preliminary reports of this association surfaced as far back as March 2020... I think the media has been potentially guilty of mass murder by way of not reporting this. Can't even begin to figure how many older folks might not have died while waiting for this COVID vaccine to be developed, approved, and distributed.

My physician wanted me to have MMR antibody titers run first... mine all said 'protective'... mumps was >300 (I remember having had mumps when I was somewhere between 6 & 10 yrs of age) ... but all indications are that those antibodies don't protect against COVID19 disease. I told the MD that he could either script it out for me so insurance would pay for it, or I'd pay for it out of pocket, but I WAS going to get it even if I had to pay full price. Turned out, insurance covered it, didn't need a prescription from a doctor, but even if it hadn't, two doses at ~$100 a pop was money well spent, when it looks like folks with antibodies due to MMR II vaccine have mild to no symptoms... no hospitalization, no death.
So... I went to Kroger pharmacy and got the MMR II... get my booster on Wednesday of this week.
 

Banjo

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76Bar,
What I'm seeing in all these studies is that even though the medical authorities say that those of us who were born prior to 1957 are regarded as 'immune' to measles, mumps, rubella - either because we had the diseases, or had the earlier vaccines - the antibodies we have are not the same as those directed against the viral strains in the MMR II vaccine, and further, the immune 'memory' cells that we had may have declined to the point that they're essentially no longer there. And it looks like the antibodies directed against the strains in the MMR II vaccine are what are protective against COVID19 disease severity, though they apparently don't prevent infection.
So... recommendations are that folks over 40 yrs of age, who've not had the MMR II series, would probably benefit from getting those vaccinations.

All the 'science' suggests that it's a low-risk/high potential gain endeavor. 40 yr track record for this vaccine... any side effects are well-known. First preliminary reports of this association surfaced as far back as March 2020... I think the media has been potentially guilty of mass murder by way of not reporting this. Can't even begin to figure how many older folks might not have died while waiting for this COVID vaccine to be developed, approved, and distributed.

My physician wanted me to have MMR antibody titers run first... mine all said 'protective'... mumps was >300 (I remember having had mumps when I was somewhere between 6 & 10 yrs of age) ... but all indications are that those antibodies don't protect against COVID19 disease. I told the MD that he could either script it out for me so insurance would pay for it, or I'd pay for it out of pocket, but I WAS going to get it even if I had to pay full price. Turned out, insurance covered it, didn't need a prescription from a doctor, but even if it hadn't, two doses at ~$100 a pop was money well spent, when it looks like folks with antibodies due to MMR II vaccine have mild to no symptoms... no hospitalization, no death.
So... I went to Kroger pharmacy and got the MMR II... get my booster on Wednesday of this week.
Are you still gonna get the Covid vaccine? or not.
 

Brute 23

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We have compassion... but it's for EVERYONE... big picture... not just ourselves or "our group".

Our feelings have to to be combined with logic to come to a conclusion... not just one or the other.
 

herofan

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We have compassion... but it's for EVERYONE... big picture... not just ourselves or "our group".

Our feelings have to to be combined with logic to come to a conclusion... not just one or the other.
I couldn’t agree more. It’s just interesting to me what some consider logic and common sense.

Who knows, there may not be as big of a divide between the sides as it seems. It appears that some people feel we should just be going about our business as usual as if nothing were going on, which doesn’t seem logical to me, but perhaps that is not how they truly feel.
 

ChrisB2

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Can't argue with that. If people would accept dying in January, they would be much less likely to die in February.

But really nobody knows what is best and we probably never wii know what was correct. I only hope leaders on both sides of the aisle are doing what they truely think is right and not making decisions based on what will get them reelected.
 

herofan

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Can't argue with that. If people would accept dying in January, they would be much less likely to die in February.

But really nobody knows what is best and we probably never wii know what was correct. I only hope leaders on both sides of the aisle are doing what they truely think is right and not making decisions based on what will get them reelected.
True. I’m certainly no expert on anything. I’m not in charge of anything, so I’m just trying to navigate the situation the best I know how. I am just amazed at how many experts we have on the subject that I didn’t know about. Truck drivers, lawyers, farmers, construction workers, etc., are experts on the virus, mask effectiveness, immunity, and exactly what needs to be done as a whole. I’m having to adjust to that, because I didn’t assume it applied in any other situation.

If an expert mechanic who was not a cattle farmer came to this site and tried to argue a point about cattle nutrition that was contrary to what those here believed, I’m sure it wouldn’t carry much weight, but most people who claim to know all about Covid and what should be done have about that much credibility. As you wrote, I don’t think anybody knows what is best and probably never will know for sure.
 

timwil94

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True. I’m certainly no expert on anything. I’m not in charge of anything, so I’m just trying to navigate the situation the best I know how. I am just amazed at how many experts we have on the subject that I didn’t know about. Truck drivers, lawyers, farmers, construction workers, etc., are experts on the virus, mask effectiveness, immunity, and exactly what needs to be done as a whole. I’m having to adjust to that, because I didn’t assume it applied in any other situation.

If an expert mechanic who was not a cattle farmer came to this site and tried to argue a point about cattle nutrition that was contrary to what those here believed, I’m sure it wouldn’t carry much weight, but most people who claim to know all about Covid and what should be done have about that much credibility. As you wrote, I don’t think anybody knows what is best and probably never will know for sure.

In terms of politics, too, as a rule, there are enough experts. Everyone from his own bell tower broadcasts his opinion, trying to convince everyone around him that he is right. In fact, a person does not even understand basic things.
 

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