Cost efficiency

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

What are your feelings on what breed is the easiest keeping, most cost efficient while putting the most $$ in your pocket? I realize there is no right or wrong answer since there is such a large contrast in climate/environment conditions between board members. So shoot from the hip and be honest!
Thanks for your input.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
la4angus":3alnqbue said:
Beefy":3alnqbue said:
a crossbreed.
crossbreed what?
limo X char or angus X jersey. maybe a chi X maine.
maine X guernsey should work everywhere.

Those would be 4 crosses that I wouldn't think would work very many places.
Half continental half british. Pretty much your choice as long as they will fitr your environment and managment. Breed them to a termianl sire, (not breed, sire) and you could hit either top yeild grade or top guality grade and half a good chance of hitting both. Heterosis in the cow herd from the first cross, heterosis in the calf from the dam and from it's own genetics.

dun
 

Campground Cattle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2004
Messages
2,533
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
British Whites

The following information applies to purebred British White Cattle and therefore most crosses in Australia and USA will have varying degrees of these characteristics.
Breeders and enthusiasts are cautioned to check blood percentages before making claims about particular cattle or herds. With the introduction of pure bred stock to Australia from the UK in 1984 and the availability of semen from approved British White bulls for general use in 1986, the following attributes will, in the near future become fully accepted.

1. A full visual description of the breed is as follows: White coat on blue or dark pigmented skin. Black points, viz muzzle, nose, ears, eyelids, teats of cows, rudimentary teats of bulls, legs with a splash of colour or spots of colour on the front of each fetlock, black hooves, black tongue is desirable. Some cattle appear in the breed with red points, but still retain the foregoing makings. The Society makes no distinction on colour other than noting the red pointed animals. The body is usually marked with a splash or spots of colour on the neck, dollar spots on the flanks or back and quite frequently breech marks. Mature cows weigh to 650 kgs and mature bulls to one tonne.

2. Milking ability is a strong point in favour of the breed. British Whites were for many years an important feature of English dairy herds where regular flows were required with suitable butterfat levels. They have well set udders with minimum of fatty tissue and medium sized teats that hold their shape. There is less likelihood of unsucked quarters and generally there is a freedom from associated problems.

3. Excellent mothering ability by individual females, also incorporating the nursery system of a guard cow protecting groups of calves whiles the remainder of the herd grazes. Although this characteristic is known in some breeds of cattle, it is highly developed in British Whites and is of great benefit in areas where wild dogs or other predators are a concern.

4. Naturally polled. Being a dominant gene this feature is an advantage in mixed breeding programmes.

5. The black points and pigmented skin eliminate the problems of eye cancer, sunburn or sunburnt teats and photosensitisation is unknown in this breed.

6. British White have a high degree of heat tolerance and frequently sit or lie in the sun whilst other cattle seek a shady position. Their ability to withstand above average heat points to the breed being ideally suited to Australian climatic conditions, particularly over northern cattle breeding regions.

7. The strong black hooves hold their shape and housed stock seldom if ever require hoof paring: likewise an absence of hoof problems in the field. The breed is also known for its free movement and walking ability.

8. A healthy breed, having resistance to tuberculosis and viral pneumonia, No apparent tendencies to arthritis (UK) and a low incidence of calving difficulties.

9. Excellent foragers with an ability to convert lower grade pasture to maintain body weight and rear calves. Recent bull trials in Britain and steer trials in the USA show the British White holding their own against other breeds and in most instance have been ahead in weight gains and feed conversion ratios. Low back fat measurements combine with high quality fleshing is the feature required by cattle breeders, butchers and consumers. The breed meets these requirements.

10. The British White is prepotent in a number of areas, one being the colour marking ability. A high incidence of true colour occurs in cattle with less than 25% of British White blood. This characteristic is of great benefit in regions where cattlemen prefer white haired stock for sun reflection with the added advantage of the pigmentation.

11. Longevity is a feature of the breed combined with excellent breeding records. The incidence of twins being one of the extra benefits. Various government and private bodies have sort to increase twinning rates in different breeds of cattle with mixed success. The British White is one of the few breeds in the world having a natural high percentage of twins per herd average.

12. Good temperament and showing a high degree of intelligence, British White in general are excellent to handle in the field or yards and at close quarters. Breeders wishing to prepare stock for shows will appreciate these attributes when feeding and handling under stall conditions.
 

Beefy

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 2, 2004
Messages
8,754
Reaction score
0
Location
Georgia
How about half smartass and half know-it-all?

Seriously though, like most answers on this board, it depends on location.
For instance in my area something like Brangus crossed with charolais or simmental or even limousin would work. Up north maybe some color of angus crossed with simmental.

As usual, Dun's answer is dead on. It needs to be a continental british cross and if in the south perhaps a little bos indicus.
 

hillbilly

Well-known member
Joined
May 4, 2004
Messages
365
Reaction score
0
Location
SW Missouri
Beefy":3nfbo0qv said:
How about half smartass and half know-it-all?

Seriously though, like most answers on this board, it depends on location.
For instance in my area something like Brangus crossed with charolais or simmental or even limousin would work. Up north maybe some color of angus crossed with simmental.

As usual, Dun's answer is dead on. It needs to be a continental british cross and if in the south perhaps a little bos indicus.

I agree with Beefy & Dun. 50/50, If in the south rotate in Brangus & Simbrah every other round.
The key is to avoid getting calves that look pure continental.
If you can get "Super Brits" [50/50 calves that look pure British] you will top the feeder market. Choose breeds & individuals wisely.

Hillbilly
 

Latest posts

Top