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Charcoaled Armadillo Toenails

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Jogeephus

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Are you wanting a recipe for fresh, aged, cured, sun dried, picked-over or mummified?
 
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HerefordSire

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Jogeephus":2s5bj3uc said:
Are you wanting a recipe for fresh, aged, cured, sun dried, picked-over or mummified?

I will take 'em any way I can find 'em.

Dead Armadillo

Serving Temperature: 40-45° F
Original Gravity: 12.5° Plato
Final Gravity: N/A
Int'l Bittering Units: 25.0
Alcohol by Volume: 4.5%

Dead Armadillo is brewed with a combination of dried armadillo liver, ground armadillo tail skin, and portions of rubber from the tire that ran the little bugger over. This unusual brew is hopped up front with powdered armadillo toenails for their funky bittering characteristics and then dry-hopped aggressively with dehydrated armadillo nostrils for their obvious aromatic contributions. Or was it a combination of two-row Pale, sweet-roasted Caramel, and dark-roasted Black Patent malts? Might have actually been German Hersbrucker hops come to think of it.

Notes From the Panel:

Note a predominately crystal and dark maltiness in the Armadillo's nose so to speak. Look for great head retention in this dark amber, slightly hazy, light-to-medium-bodied beer. Dead Armadillo's flavor profile, as the nose would indicate is also primarily dark maltiness with some crystal malt sweetness and a trace of hop bitterness. Look for a tart, bitter end, as would seem appropriate for any beer bearing such a name. Overall, a very clean, crisp and drinkable beer.


http://www.beermonthclub.com/newsletters/vol2no4.htm
 

Jogeephus

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I just can't agree with the reviews for I find the subtle taste of rubber is overpowered by the pungent taste of asphalt. Sun drying it does give it a more mellow taste.
 
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HerefordSire

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Jogeephus":tjgut6ha said:
I just can't agree with the reviews for I find the subtle taste of rubber is overpowered by the pungent taste of asphalt. Sun drying it does give it a more mellow taste.

The more power to you if you can find a delicacy like an Armadillo without a little rubber or asphalt, aka road kill, that is, unless you have a real nicely bred dog like mine, then you only have to worry about the fluffy bow-wow taste simmering on the upper tounge crust while curling or swirling back and forth amongst the dentures.
 

Angus Cowman

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I prefer to ventilate my Dillos for a few days
have tried several methods and all succeeded it just matters how much ventilation is needed at that moment
270 savage more than adequate
22-250 does fine for most purposes as does the 223
22 mag is in the same class as above

reg 22 lr is fine but usually less than 50yrd and carcass may run a short distance

50 cal black powder is a lil overkill provides excess ventilation
 
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HerefordSire

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So you would rather trade the aroma of rubber, asphalt, and maybe fluffy bow-wow (or all three) for the non-disciminating essense of gun powder? They have Armadillo in the show me state? Possom? I know you have skunk there. Ever put skunk in beer or wine before to, you know, liven up the flavor a little? We might as will take what mother nature provides and cut down on our moonshine bill at the same time, right?
 

Angus Cowman

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yes we have dillos here the first one I seen this far north was back in the 80s and now we can't get rid of them
I just wish them Texans would have kept them :lol:

The gunpowder doesn't affect the taste as much as the lead fragments but I know several people that a little lead wouldn't hurt anyway :lol: :lol:
 

TexasBred

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All the ones in Texas are holding "Lone Star" longnecks. Which brings me to the question. Why did the chicken cross the road??? Just to show the amardillo that it COULD be done. :lol: :lol:
 
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HerefordSire

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Angus Cowman":2jukzule said:
yes we have dillos here the first one I seen this far north was back in the 80s and now we can't get rid of them
I just wish them Texans would have kept them :lol:

The gunpowder doesn't affect the taste as much as the lead fragments but I know several people that a little lead wouldn't hurt anyway :lol: :lol:

The last time I ate squirrel I bit into one of those lead balls. Should I tell you I never ate squirrel again? Now Armadillo toenails are a different story. The pellets will richochette against toenails. That is why road kill is so popular here especially during this economic downturn...pellets. In the last week the dogs I have, rounded up an armadillo and a skunk for their stash because Wal-Mart's dog food prices rose when commodities rose, but they have not come back down like commodities have come down.
 
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HerefordSire

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TexasBred":18jo6525 said:
All the ones in Texas are holding "Lone Star" longnecks. Which brings me to the question. Why did the chicken cross the road??? Just to show the amardillo that it COULD be done. :lol: :lol:

You like that rot gut? :mrgreen:

I like the long neck Bud Limes. Had one yet?
 

TexasBred

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HerefordSire":2ct0meo4 said:
TexasBred":2ct0meo4 said:
All the ones in Texas are holding "Lone Star" longnecks. Which brings me to the question. Why did the chicken cross the road??? Just to show the amardillo that it COULD be done. :lol: :lol:

You like that rot gut? :mrgreen:

I like the long neck Bud Limes. Had one yet?

I had "one" of either the Bud Lime or the Miller "look alike". I believe it was Bud....One was good but didn't want another. And don't know that I've ever drank a Lone Star. Got a couple of Czech beers they serve around here but I can neither pronounce nor spell the name. :lol: :lol: Not bad beer either.
 

ga. prime

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The worlds fattest cat loves armadillo.
 
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HerefordSire

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I am gonna quit being bashful. If you live in Texas or the Southwest, there is a possibility you can find buried Glyptodon "scutes" which is a relative to Armadillo. This is a delicacy and is superior flavor relative to Armadillo Toenails. They are a little harder to find, but well worth the added effort.

Glyptodon is part of the placental group of mammals known as Xenarthra. This order of mammals includes anteaters, tree sloths, extinct ground sloths, extinct pampatheres, and armadillos.

Glyptodon originated in South America. A related genus, Glyptotherium, first appeared in the American Southwest about 2.5 million years ago as a result of the Great American Interchange, a set of migrations that occurred after North and South America were connected by the rising of the volcanic Isthmus of Panama. They became extinct about 10,000 years ago. The native human population in their range is believed to have hunted them and used the shells of dead animals as shelters in inclement weather.[1][2]

Glyptodon was covered by a protective shell composed of more than 1,000 one inch-thick bony plates, called osteoderms or scutes. Each species of glyptodont had its own unique osteoderm pattern and shell type. With this protection they were armored like turtles. Unlike most turtles, glyptodonts could not withdraw their heads, but instead had a bony cap on the top of their skull. Even the tail of Glyptodon had a ring of bones for protection. Such a massive shell needed considerable support, evidenced by features such as fused vertebrae, short but massive limbs, and a broad shoulder girdle.(Lambert, 196)

Glyptodon skeleton, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, ParisThe nasal passage was reduced with heavy muscle attachments for some unknown purpose. Some have speculated that the muscle attachments were for a proboscis, or trunk, much like that of a tapir or elephant. Most animals with a trunk, however, have nasal bones receding back on the skull, and glyptodonts do not have this feature. The lower jaws were very deep and helped support massive chewing muscles to help chew the coarse fibrous plants that can be found along river and lake banks


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyptodon
 

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