Cattle Trailer

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Anonymous

Cattle trailer floor gone bad (has 2" x 10" boards running side to side.) When floor was good, I noticed that cows would slip in their own manure and fall in trailer. I'm still pretty green, but I am afraid cows will get hurt that way. Since I must replace floor, seemed like a good time to seek advice on the best material to use for flooring. Thanks.



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Anonymous

i would suggest treated lumber and tongue and groove gives you a solid floor to wash the manure out better.i took a wire corral panel and using fence staples i nailed it to the floor for traction it works very well.you cut the length with bolt cutters and for $15.00 it is worth the money.
> Cattle trailer floor gone bad (has
> 2" x 10" boards running
> side to side.) When floor was
> good, I noticed that cows would
> slip in their own manure and fall
> in trailer. I'm still pretty
> green, but I am afraid cows will
> get hurt that way. Since I must
> replace floor, seemed like a good
> time to seek advice on the best
> material to use for flooring.
> Thanks.



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Anonymous

A solid floor won't allow the moisture to run out. The floor will stay wet & rot faster. This is why nearly all stock trailers have spaces btwn. their floor boards.

> i would suggest treated lumber and
> tongue and groove gives you a
> solid floor to wash the manure out
> better.i took a wire corral panel
> and using fence staples i nailed
> it to the floor for traction it
> works very well.you cut the length
> with bolt cutters and for $15.00
> it is worth the money.
 
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A

Anonymous

Agree. Need to have some spaces between boards, even if just 1/4". Our trailers have 2 x 12" pressure treated (CCA .40) boards--have had no problems. If a serious problem, could install the special rubber mats (expensive). After hauling, unhitch trailer and slope it back then wash it out good--slope will allow it to drain and air dry. If using mats, remove mats, wash, let mats and floor air dry. Lot cheaper in long run that replacing trailer floors.

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Anonymous

I also agree there needs to be spaces between the boards. While cheaper in the long run the wire may not work if you ever haul a horse. The horse's shoes could catch in the wire. Our Gooseneck brand trailer came from the factory with boards bolted to the floor for traction they run side to side about every six feet and one runs the length of the of the trailer. Seems to work pretty well.



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Anonymous

> I also agree there needs to be
> spaces between the boards. While
> cheaper in the long run the wire
> may not work if you ever haul a
> horse. The horse's shoes could
> catch in the wire. Our Gooseneck
> brand trailer came from the
> factory with boards bolted to the
> floor for traction they run side
> to side about every six feet and
> one runs the length of the of the
> trailer. Seems to work pretty
> well. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~thats good for traction but seems like it would be hard to clean out.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Tc
 
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Anonymous

if you also oil the floor and keep it washed out as soon as you use it, it will last. one floor lasted 18 years but you must take care of them. if you leave a space it will dry but manure will get in the cracks and is hard to get out.both will work but nothing last forever right. the wire panel will not work for horses i have had them hang a shoe in it. i havehad them do that pawing at barbwire too. but you can pull it out and put it back easy.

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Anonymous

the best and easiest way in my opinion to make a trailer floor is to take the 2" boards and place rubber mats that are discarded from a dairy on top of them (slight grooves perpendicular to the driving direction). easy to clean out with a pressure hose and virtually for free (the mats that is).

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