Can you have Jerseys as pasture mommas?

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What do these F1 crosses do for milk production ? Can they lean towards being heavy producers similar to the Jersey, or do they hit in between as a moderate milker ? I have know idea where the brahmas fall as far as milking ability.
Brahma cows are very good mommas, and have plenty of milk for their babies. so the Br x Jers cows will have even more. We have a 1/2 Guernsey 1/2 Hereford nurse cow, tht has raised 2 this year. As opposed to the full dairy ones we have that raised about 4. She was fed to enchance milk production. I am sure if she was just in a pasture with just her baby, she wouldn't make to much milk, get mastitis etc. @Caustic Burno , have you ever had to milk one of your f1's, or graft another calf on one?
 
Thank you for the detailed advise! My heart is not set on anything. I'd love something that is lower maintenance that will keep the grass eaten down and turn a profit.

Just haul them to the vet and have the vet AI them, or is that something somewhat manageable on my own?
Or have the vet come out and do it. Ask around to find out if there are any AI techs in your area. They will do just as good a job as a vet will. Some ag colleges and extension services offer AI courses. You can learn to do it yourself.
 
Brahma cows are very good mommas, and have plenty of milk for their babies. so the Br x Jers cows will have even more. We have a 1/2 Guernsey 1/2 Hereford nurse cow, tht has raised 2 this year. As opposed to the full dairy ones we have that raised about 4. She was fed to enchance milk production. I am sure if she was just in a pasture with just her baby, she wouldn't make to much milk, get mastitis etc. @Caustic Burno , have you ever had to milk one of your f1's, or graft another calf on one?
Nope I have had a couple through the years with detached udder.
Never had to graft because those Brimmer momma's will raise an orphan.
They will nurse an orphan.
 
I have been fooling with Corrientes for over 30 years, raising pooled, black calves from them. I make more money with these, then anyone can with any other type cattle. BUt, I will tell you a Brahma x Corr is just about worthless. A straight Corr calf would be worth even more as roping stock. I have met one man who did this cross, He is a stock contractor for junior rodeo. Or high School rodeo or LIl Britches..I can't remember which. He wanted to come up with a smaller Plummer-type bucking bull. If you want to get Corrr cows and be successful, sell the Brahma bull and get the best registered Angus or Brangus bull you can afford. You don't have to get all solid colored Corr cows either if you have a good quality, homo for black and polled bull. Even better, no more than you will have, just AI them to best Angus or Brangus bull on the market.

But if your heart is set on raising Br x Herf heifers, then do what @MurraysMutts advised. You may can get 3 Corr cows for what a Hereford cow will costs. But, a Brahma x Herf heifer will sell for at least 3 times more than a Br x Corr calf will. An open, f1 BR x Herf heifer will sell for enough money for you to buy maybe 2 Hereford cows, or close to it.

If you have 10 or less cows, I would sell that Br bull and just AI everything. You can sell that bull for enough money to get some good Hereford cows. Heck, buy 2 Hereford and 2 Corr cows. AI the herf to Brahma sexed for female semen, and AI the Corrs to sexed for male Angus/Brangus semen. You can get $1500 or better for the black steers at weaning, and use the money to buy more cows. Sell those two for $3k, buy a good Herford cow for $1500, another Corr for $500, and you get $1000 to cover expenses that year. Next year , you will have 3 Ang x Corr steers, to sell for $4500, and 3 more Br x Herf heifers. Won't take very long to get your herd of f1 cows, and you won't have to spend too much more, if any, money over what the Brahma bull brought.

Did you make all that money the last 30 years with corrientes selling them for beef cattle or for working with horses? Most people are asking about beef cattle.
 
What do these F1 crosses do for milk production ? Can they lean towards being heavy producers similar to the Jersey, or do they hit in between as a moderate milker ? I have know idea where the brahmas fall as far as milking ability.
I'm very curious as well. I think @Caustic Burno somewhat answered in the post above tho. The brahma side is VERY motherly. I can imagine combined with the jersey mothering ability, just HAS TO BE AN AWESOME COW!!
The milking ability is a very good question. Tho it might be interesting to try and graft calves. 😆
Wild cow milking anyone??
Did I create a pond ? :unsure:
Nope. The pond is elsewhere. Try n keep up! Lol
 
Did you make all that money the last 30 years with corrientes selling them for beef cattle or for working with horses? Most people are asking about beef cattle.
In the mid to late 90's, team penning became all the rage around here. I had raised Corrs for roping and dogging since the 80's. For teampenning, you need groups of 30 head, same size, color, etc. That's when I started breeding the Corr's to Angus bulls, and started contracting to provide cattle for pennings. I'd sell them at about 2 yrs old...get about 2 seasons out of them. I think steers always sold by the pound, and the heifers mostly by the head. When the Obama recession hit. teampenning, like a lot of equine pursuits, dried up. When things got little better after 2010, team sorting became what most people did. Requires less cattle. So I guess for the last 15 years or so, we have been selling the calves at weaning. I think back when we had them all calving in February, there was a time or two someone came out to get all of them for calf roping - when younger- and then probably used them for penning or sorting. But, I assume most of them these days are bought to background, feed out, etc, for beef. They just go in the pens with other steers or heifers in the same weight class, and are sold by the pound. This year, we have contracted to let them all go to a man, that raises 900-1000 each year, feeds them out, and sells them to a buyer for a large, up-scale steak house chain. They have to score CAB Prime_+ for them to use them, and all of the ones he sends make that cut. The man has 400 Corr cows of his own (that we are buying) and he has people in Fla and south Alabama, that he buys 600 more from every year. Just about all of their cows are Fla Scrub/Cracker, or Pineywoods cows. He supplies the bulls for them to use from his registered Brangus operation. The bulls you use are the key. Lots of people who do this, just get a sale-barn, commercial "angus", and these end up with other-colored calves, even horns and scurs. We have been fortunate to have access to $5-10k Brangus, black Simm, and Chi-Angus bulls from Scott's brother. ( As well as various composites of the 3 that he comes up with as a result of him trying to come up with a composite "breed" ) If we had to buy these bulls, we wouldn't make as much money.

Kinda like the dude that wanted to buy some of ours for his Wagyu operation. He is a seed stock producer of Akaushi and that black Japanee Wagyu breed, so he already has these bulls. Makes sense for him to run these Corrs on his un-improved land, and produce those 1/2 blood calves that the association guarantees to bring 20 cents a pound more than the top selling in that weight class that day. But, for us to do that with our 176 cows, we'd have to buy about 8 or 9 $10k bulls. Yeah, on a 500 lb calf that would pay $100 per calf more than our CAB qualified blacks would, and on 176 that would be $17,600 more, but that would take a while to recover $80k-$90k worth of bulls. 4-5 years to be exact, and by then , (or even before) you'd have to be replacing the bulls.
 
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I have been contemplating the idea of getting some jersey or corriente heifers to put on my pasture and breed to a Brahman bull just to make 1/2 Brahman mommas to breed back to a nice black bull.

Can jerseys be out on a pasture without being milked or will that cause Mastitis and other issue?
I sold a crazy Jersey heifer to a guy just to get rid of her, and he ran her with a Hereford bull and she raised a calf in the field with no problems. I saw her when her calf was probably 3/4 months old and they seemed to be doing fine. I've also seen Holsteins raising calves.

I think if a heifer starts out with a natural lactation, feeding a calf and not being milked, her udder only develops to produce what milk is needed. With all the talk about crossing on Brahman and the pics of those beautiful F1 heifers I'd strongly consider learning how to AI and trying it. The one downside is that the straight Jersey cows will have little salvage value when it comes time to sell them, but if they are cheap to begin with and they raise five or six high quality crossbreeds maybe that wouldn't be as much of an issue.
 
I sold a crazy Jersey heifer to a guy just to get rid of her, and he ran her with a Hereford bull and she raised a calf in the field with no problems. I saw her when her calf was probably 3/4 months old and they seemed to be doing fine. I've also seen Holsteins raising calves.

I think if a heifer starts out with a natural lactation, feeding a calf and not being milked, her udder only develops to produce what milk is needed. With all the talk about crossing on Brahman and the pics of those beautiful F1 heifers I'd strongly consider learning how to AI and trying it. The one downside is that the straight Jersey cows will have little salvage value when it comes time to sell them, but if they are cheap to begin with and they raise five or six high quality crossbreeds maybe that wouldn't be as much of an issue.
I see good Jerseys selling for as much or more than Herfords. And salvage value these days? I was watching a sale in ND online, and an 1800lb Holstein, nothing but a 6 foot tall bag of bones with an udder dragging the ground, brought $1.54! Next spring I will have five 1/2 Br x 1/2 dairy heifers for sale, and eight 1/2 Br x 1/2 Hereford heifers for sale. I am guessing the 1/2 Herefords will bring a few hundred dollars more each. One of the 1/2 dairies is a Gyr x 1/2 Hereford 1/2 Guernsey, that is a dark tiger stripe. I am betting she will bring more than the other 4...probably what the 1/2 Herefords will. The up-side to using Jerseys is, they can raise you 3 or 4 more each year, if you have the time and inclination to fool with nurse cows.
You may be right about starting a heifer out on natural lactation and not being milked. I remember once when I as in school,. I had raised qa Holsteinm heifer on a bottlem and we turned her out in my grand daddy's Angus herd. She had a calf every year, and her udder never got like the ones you see in dairies. It got about as big as the original red & white Simm cow udders would get.
 
I'm very curious as well. I think @Caustic Burno somewhat answered in the post above tho. The brahma side is VERY motherly. I can imagine combined with the jersey mothering ability, just HAS TO BE AN AWESOME COW!!
The milking ability is a very good question. Tho it might be interesting to try and graft calves. 😆
Wild cow milking anyone??

Nope. The pond is elsewhere. Try n keep up! Lol
I had seen the picture before of the J&B cross, and they looked really nice.
I'm not a very fast reader, so I think I will drop out. :)
 
I have a machine milked Jersey first calf heifer that is feeding 3 calves 1.5 gallons each plus a gallon for the house. I'm raising these heifers for family milk cows. Next year might raise beef on dairy steer calves also to sell. I don't want to mess up her udder with a bunch of fosters as a nurse cow since this is a one cow dairy. Maybe 2 calves, wean then put on another. This depends on her still unknown temperament.

Daphne, the old Jersey cow, made me a black half Angus heifer sold to the ranch across the road two years ago. She raises a fat calf. Not too great in frame but heavy.
L.O.V..JPG
 
It is beyond me to understand why a person would start out with a small slow growing breed to get more milk when I hear people complain about cows that milk too much. Because they don't hold condition, breed back, and require extra feed. The calf might grow well because of the extra milk but it also might take after the genetics from its mother and remain small and slow growing.

Side note was at the sale today. 2 Angus/Corriente cross heifers came through. They sold for $1.50 a pound. Straight Angus heifers the same size (550) sold for $2.65-$2.75.
 
It is beyond me to understand why a person would start out with a small slow growing breed to get more milk when I hear people complain about cows that milk too much. Because they don't hold condition, breed back, and require extra feed. The calf might grow well because of the extra milk but it also might take after the genetics from its mother and remain small and slow growing.

Side note was at the sale today. 2 Angus/Corriente cross heifers came through. They sold for $1.50 a pound. Straight Angus heifers the same size (550) sold for $2.65-$2.75.
One of the "bad" things about a good nurse cow.
The cows own calf is almost always worth the least amount of money at sale time. It's the bought calves that make the dollars. Since I've been buying better quality calves to put on my cows, the total dollars is much better.

The good thing I've found is when the cow has her own calf, it sure makes it easier to graft extra calves on. The 2nd set of calves is the most work. Mama has been doting over the 1st set for long enough, she becomes uninterested in any new calves.

Food for thought for the theme of the original post.
 
One of the "bad" things about a good nurse cow.
The cows own calf is almost always worth the least amount of money at sale time. It's the bought calves that make the dollars. Since I've been buying better quality calves to put on my cows, the total dollars is much better.

The good thing I've found is when the cow has her own calf, it sure makes it easier to graft extra calves on. The 2nd set of calves is the most work. Mama has been doting over the 1st set for long enough, she becomes uninterested in any new calves.

Food for thought for the theme of the original post.
I wasn't talking about a nurse cow. That is an entirely different issue than starting a breeding program based on a Jersey cow.
 

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