Calving ease my ass........

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Buck Randall

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Sure, as long as you're paying the minimum $500 to get a vet out here.. last time it was $1000... I don't know how it is for the OP though.
At 7 months I don't think the calf would be over 40-50 lbs which shouldn't be an issue
The size of the calf isn't the main problem, it's that the heifer is likely to be tight as a drum. The hormones that allow the vagina and vulva to stretch are naturally produced in the last weeks of pregnancy. When you abort a heifer at 7 months, you're missing out on that. The calf is much smaller at that stage, but the heifer's ability to pass a calf is much smaller, too.

I assume you're talking Canadian dollars, so $400 US. That's not small change, but for a good heifer and a live calf that you wouldn't otherwise have, I wouldn't say it's outrageous.
 

Buck Randall

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I'd just think the calf is going to be growing faster than the heifer will be preparing... I dunno, just gut feeling
I don't disagree with that. My point was that it's probably too late to get out of the situation easily with a couple of shots. She's either going to get torn up taking it out the back or it will have to come out the side. My preference would be the c-section, as you at least get a calf out of the deal.
 

TCRanch

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I don't disagree with that. My point was that it's probably too late to get out of the situation easily with a couple of shots. She's either going to get torn up taking it out the back or it will have to come out the side. My preference would be the c-section, as you at least get a calf out of the deal.
And @Nesikep. Both! I lute all my heifers at weaning but one was so far along she died trying to abort, the calf was just too big. According to my dates/spreadsheet, she had to have been bred at 4 months. But before I started pulling the bulls early & luting the heifers, had another "oops" that ended with a c-section. The heifer fully recovered but the calf was also breech & dead so we sold her. Babies having babies - it's all bad. But it happens.
 

noltrh

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you could give her a shot of dex/lute and abort her, or wait a bit and when she's getting a bit bagged up and you figure you'll have a viable calf, you could give a shot of dex and induce a little ahead of time.. .whether you'd want her to raise it, well, it would retard her growth for sure
Thx! I was wondering about inducing.
Like go get calf. Don’t care if it’s not a keeper.
 

noltrh

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What is does the heifer weight now? I've only had one that got missed with Lute when doing bangs vaccinations. Talked with vet when things got close, so he was ready. Ended up having to do a cecerain to save the heifer, lost the calf. Hope your luck is better than mine, but I'd keep the Vet at the ready.
900
 

Nesikep

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yeah, it would have been a much easier choice at 4 months, but if you'd abort her now, she's got time to get ready for the correct breeding season again still.. it is a hard choice
 

noltrh

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yeah, it would have been a much easier choice at 4 months, but if you'd abort her now, she's got time to get ready for the correct breeding season again still.. it is a hard choice
Really is a hard one. I’ll check calf now and decide. Like you said I can get her ready for correct season. This second time since I put this breed together they bred before weaning. The last one wasn’t noticeable until 8 months. She had the calf couple weeks later but only weighed 45 lbs.
 

Stocker Steve

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a mature 1400 lb cow in a frame 5 or so shouldn't have an issue with a 100 lb calf
Bought some mature Hereford cows in a previous life and bred them BA. It was a big surprise when most bull calves were 105-110# using a scale. Never touched a one. Wonder what happened when these girls calved as heifers?
 

damengineer

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I’m in agreement with that assessment of heterosis. For years we used CE Angus bulls on mostly Angus type heifers and most calved easily with small calves, on rare occasions one would be a whopper and might need help. Then used a moderate BW Hereford bull in some Hereford heifers with no problems either. This year we calved out a few to a supposedly CE Hereford. The Hereford or high percentage Herefords calved unassisted but all but 1 of the other breed heifers had monster calves that needed help. I’m seriously considering trying a longhorn bull for heifers.
I put a longhorn bull on my cows after losing 6 out of 13 in one year. Since then I have lost one to malnutrition, his Mama had no weaned the previous calf. Then I had one 2 months ago the the head was turned backwards. 30 mile trailer ride to vet and when she got in the chute the calf fell out. Next time I will just haul them around the section line. Had no problems with calving in the past 4 years since a longhorn bull. I don't get to watch them 24/7 and am partially disabled to help. I have Angus cows that must have some holstein in them as they give way too much milk for a beef cow. I am keeping all my longhorn angus heifers for brood cows. Sometime I will change to angus bull when I get some Longhorn blood in everything. Longhorn calves just thrive better. Had one fell in creed just after birth. I found it and covered it with hay. Live calf next morning. Had one born in -10 deg. The Mama waited until I had bladed the snow and sread out a blanket of hay. Then she had the calf. That is the mindset of a longhorn cross.... I hate that the buyers hit me for the longhorn blood, but the meat of a longhorn angus cross is amazing..
 

Warren Allison

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I put a longhorn bull on my cows after losing 6 out of 13 in one year. Since then I have lost one to malnutrition, his Mama had no weaned the previous calf. Then I had one 2 months ago the the head was turned backwards. 30 mile trailer ride to vet and when she got in the chute the calf fell out. Next time I will just haul them around the section line. Had no problems with calving in the past 4 years since a longhorn bull. I don't get to watch them 24/7 and am partially disabled to help. I have Angus cows that must have some holstein in them as they give way too much milk for a beef cow. I am keeping all my longhorn angus heifers for brood cows. Sometime I will change to angus bull when I get some Longhorn blood in everything. Longhorn calves just thrive better. Had one fell in creed just after birth. I found it and covered it with hay. Live calf next morning. Had one born in -10 deg. The Mama waited until I had bladed the snow and sread out a blanket of hay. Then she had the calf. That is the mindset of a longhorn cross.... I hate that the buyers hit me for the longhorn blood, but the meat of a longhorn angus cross is amazing..
Where are you located damenengineer? Are these LH calves out of the Angus cows turning out polled?
 

OzssieDave19

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Yep I bought a limo bull from a guy who backed his stock all the way to the side of the road. My father had 120 heifers joined to his bulls I bought a random 20 joined it to my pull. I had more calving trouble than dad by double. The stud washed his hands of me and I washed my hands of the bill I named hamburger! Such a waste. You ruin a good heifer and you don’t get the future daughter to retain you had planned not to mention the pain for the heifer and they stuffing around you have to do!!! Such a shame.
 
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