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Calf with very Red Eyes

JMichal

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Had a calf born Friday morning durin a huge rain storm (7.5") We dried him off when we found them. He seemed chilled but okay. They moved a couple times Friday so we fet they were doing okay. Moved a little again Saturday and calf seemed weak. Wev had not seen him up or nursing. Eyes were bloodshot. He got up when approached this morning and wandered off deleriously. Mother followed him. Did not see him nurse. He did not get up again all day. We brought him in this eve and tubed him with 2 quarts of milk replcer. His eyes are all red where the white would be. What causes this and what are we up against. I hit him with Nuflor this afternoon also.
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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JMichal":2u5x05pb said:
Had a calf born Friday morning durin a huge rain storm (7.5") We dried him off when we found them. He seemed chilled but okay. They moved a couple times Friday so we fet they were doing okay. Moved a little again Saturday and calf seemed weak. Wev had not seen him up or nursing. Eyes were bloodshot. He got up when approached this morning and wandered off deleriously. Mother followed him. Did not see him nurse. He did not get up again all day. We brought him in this eve and tubed him with 2 quarts of milk replcer. His eyes are all red where the white would be. What causes this and what are we up against. I hit him with Nuflor this afternoon also.


Probably IBR is what you are dealing with especially if both eyes are red like that. Keep tubing him with milk replacer especially if you do not see him nursing. Actually I would probably tube him at least three times a day with some electrolytes. Start back the milk replacer when he gets his strength up. Why you waited so long to treat is beyond me.
 

TCTara

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Septicemia can cause red eyes, listlessness and even meningitis, seizures etc. It would be from a lack of colostrum or poor quality colostrum, and then challenge from bacteria etc when out in the rain. Your vet can test for protein levels,and give you an idea if there is a failure of passive transfer. A plasma or blood transfusion from the dam can provide the calf with the needed protection if needed. Antibiotics are likely necessary, and it may unfortunately be too late for this calf, but a call to the vet is recommended. Ensure you know the temp of the calf when you call as well. Of course, my advice is may be worth exactly what it cost you- nada. Please update us with what is happening!
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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TCTara":3kmf51f1 said:
Septicemia can cause red eyes, listlessness and even meningitis, seizures etc. It would be from a lack of colostrum or poor quality colostrum, and then challenge from bacteria etc when out in the rain. Your vet can test for protein levels,and give you an idea if there is a failure of passive transfer. A plasma or blood transfusion from the dam can provide the calf with the needed protection if needed. Antibiotics are likely necessary, and it may unfortunately be too late for this calf, but a call to the vet is recommended. Ensure you know the temp of the calf when you call as well. Of course, my advice is may be worth exactly what it cost you- nada. Please update us with what is happening!



Right,

I should have thrown "call the vet" in with my post. I usually do but this time I forgot.
 

JMichal

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The calf was up nursing this morning and this evening. I did not intervene earlier because I have seen many calfs on the smaller side with this type of behavior. Usually the mommas will tash them somewhere until they are strong enough to be up and about. He may not have gotten enough colostrum was my concern. Or may have come down with pneumonia due to the weather and not moving around. His ears had been laid back now they are up and forward. Whe I have brought calfs like this in before they hit em with Nuflor and sent them home. Also, I do not like to tube them or bottle feed them as then they are not getting the milk with the mothers antibodies. It causes them not to want to nurse. I feel it is a last ditch effort and only do it when I feel they are not nursing. I think this calf would be dead by now had it not been nursing. Remember I only gave it 2 quarts and that was when it was 21/2 days old.

I thought the Red Eyes may be some tell tale sign of something as I have not seen it like that before. It is probably from staining or stress. And if I called a vet every time I had a calf that looked alittle slow I'd be where the Government is. Broke.

Thank you for the input. I will keep you posted.
 

regolith

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Two things:

The red eyes isn't something I would worry aobut. I see it occasionally in otherwise healthy calves, and have been told by other farmers that it's a sign of a hard calving. This may be true, I don't know for sure.

Secondly, calves can hang on for a good long time without colostrum. I know of calves that had possibly had one feed, been separated from their mothers and been found alive a week later - and recovered fully. I'm handling dairy calves where I'm not always certain whether they've fed off Mum, and I often don't tube them until they've refused a bottle for two or three consecutive feeds - 36 hours. I would guess that some of those calves guzzled milk as newborns and weren't hungry, a few would never have fed. They don't die.

I think you've got the right approach with only intervening when sure it's necessary... usually the cow can do her job.
 

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regolith":v62nlitj said:
Two things:

The red eyes isn't something I would worry aobut. I see it occasionally in otherwise healthy calves, and have been told by other farmers that it's a sign of a hard calving. This may be true, I don't know for sure.

Secondly, calves can hang on for a good long time without colostrum. I know of calves that had possibly had one feed, been separated from their mothers and been found alive a week later - and recovered fully. I'm handling dairy calves where I'm not always certain whether they've fed off Mum, and I often don't tube them until they've refused a bottle for two or three consecutive feeds - 36 hours. I would guess that some of those calves guzzled milk as newborns and weren't hungry, a few would never have fed. They don't die.

I think you've got the right approach with only intervening when sure it's necessary... usually the cow can do her job.


If that is the case the people were extremely lucky and that is an exception to the norm.
 

JMichal

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Calve is up and nursing well. Doesn't tear up the grass but is walking around well. A little slow and listless. I have seen many like this and after a couple days they come around. The 7.5" of rain the night it was born is what worried me. Wet, cold, good way to get pneumonia. That was why I hit it with Nuflor. Like I said, Vet would have done the same. I busted a blood vessel in my eye today. Hurts like heck. :help: Now I know how the calf feels. :cry2:
 

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