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calf with twisted leg (pic)

milkmaid

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Not mine... my vet's just no better at turning down freebies than I am. :lol2: I just figured I'd post the pics as I'm sure I'm not the only one absolutely fascinated by this. :p Leg is normal down to the knee, then twists at a 90 degree angle. Anyone ever seen anything like it before? He says he's planning to break the leg, get it lined up properly, put a plate in there and then cast the leg. He didn't think it was genetic, just that the calf didn't have enough room in utero and the leg grew incorrectly.





 

hillsdown

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Sounds like a great opportunity to learn about resetting limbs.. Lucky for the calf that it was put in the hands of your vet, otherwise I think it would be permanently napping..

Let us know on updates and pics as to how it is doing and what procedures your vet chooses to do..
 

ticomalo

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Wow! That beats my calf's twisted tail! I hope it works out. I'd be interested in seeing updated pictures also.
 

randiliana

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That is very interesting MM.

We had a calf born about 12 years ago with a odd deformity. His one hind leg was broken mid cannon and had healed upsidedown, parallell to the upper part of the leg. His hoof was up above hock level. When we first found him, he was up and sucking, and at first, we though that his mama had stepped on his leg and broken it. What our vet figured is that she had fallen or been hit (bunted) really hard during pregnancy, and the leg had healed incorrectly in there. There was a small hole, about the size of a quarter where the break was. We had it amputated, and he did well over the summer. We butchered him at about 800 lbs that winter.
 

bward

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Hi MM,
My Father-in-law has one pretty much exactly like that one.... same leg too. We've done nothing to correct it as the calf runs around pellmell on it just the way it is...... and I am afraid that breaking it to straighten it may make it much worse. The 90 degree angle plus the twist seems too complicated to try to repair. I am concerned as to how he will function in the snow and ice but we will deal with that when the time comes.
Please keep us updated on this little guy.
 

chippie

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We had a foal born like that (rear leg) but not as bad. She straightened out on her own and you would never know that she had a problem.

He looks like a good freebie project and an interesting one for your vet.
Personally, I think that he would grow to butcher size with proper management without any problems. The way animals adapt is remarkable.

Thanks for posting the picture.
 

denoginnizer

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I would have to agree with others about breaking it. A straight leg want make him taste any better and would substantially increase the risk of death ---before steaks.
 

Keren

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denoginnizer":2ecm8z06 said:
I would have to agree with others about breaking it. A straight leg want make him taste any better and would substantially increase the risk of death ---before steaks.

You've missed the point - the calf is being treated because it is an interesting case and will provide a good opportunity to play around with resetting the limb.

Keep us updated MM
 

milkmaid

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To answer the question that's been brought up... calf does get around pretty well, but he cannot bear weight on the leg while moving, and only uses it for balance at a standstill. Those of you who have tried to raise calves with only 3 good legs will realize that they're fine while they're small, but the bigger they get the more stress is placed on the good leg - causing damage and pain - and they rarely are comfortable as they age/grow.

Mostly he's just an interesting project though. (And I think he's turning into a pet. :p) I'm hoping maybe I'll have the opportunity to watch the surgery. I've seen some orthopedic surgeries, but nothing like this.
 

mnmtranching

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Usually animals with severe birth defects are put down at first notice. I think the vet knows already with a lot of work on his part and needless suffering from the animal he can keep it going, So, what is the point.
 

Keren

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I've always found it funny that people are always quick to euthanase "so the animal doesnt suffer"

Tell you what - if I was sick or injured, I'd sure as he11 choose the suffering over the euthanasia!

I'd put up with some pain during treatment, if it meant that after the treatment I'd be okay. And I figure the same should apply to an animal. There is always pain meds.
 

mnmtranching

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Karen, your post reminds me of something animal rights extremists would come up with.

For sure, If I were a goat I would much rather live out my life on a pretty green meadow then be consumed by humans . :shock: :help:
Or a beef, hog, turkey or anything else. I would much rather live a happy life then have people eat me. :cry2:
 

milkmaid

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I haven't seen any x-rays of the leg, so I don't know the answer to this -- but -- how is breaking and casting this calf's leg any different from finding a calf in the field that its dam stepped on, and splinting that leg? Broken leg for both calves. My vet seems to think this calfie will heal up just fine once surgery is done. Calf currently acts fine and doesn't appear to be in pain.

If I get to see the surgery I'll for sure take pictures.
 

hillsdown

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That has been answered many times what SOME people would do A :nothing and let calf either live or die B :shoot said calf in head.

I for one am very curious as to how this little guy is going to be after the surgery keep us updated please. BTW you wouldn't believe what stuff my vet does at his dads place for sick or injured dairy and beef cattle the difference between what we can do and what they can do is they have the knowledge the equipment and can get the things they need at cost especially if they own all of their clinics.
 

Keren

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mnmtranching":3t38hz96 said:
Karen, your post reminds me of something animal rights extremists would come up with.

For sure, If I were a goat I would much rather live out my life on a pretty green meadow then be consumed by humans . :shock: :help:
Or a beef, hog, turkey or anything else. I would much rather live a happy life then have people eat me. :cry2:

Huh? Call me blonde but I dont really understand your point.
 

mnmtranching

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Keren":2kr6cy11 said:
mnmtranching":2kr6cy11 said:
Karen, your post reminds me of something animal rights extremists would come up with.

For sure, If I were a goat I would much rather live out my life on a pretty green meadow then be consumed by humans . :shock: :help:
Or a beef, hog, turkey or anything else. I would much rather live a happy life then have people eat me. :cry2:

Huh? Call me blonde but I dont really understand your point.

Go back and read your reply, You are comparing birth defects in animals with birth defects in humans.
Anybody familiar raising a calf could keep that calf going. Why? A Vet should know better. There's no valuable research being done here.
I can't imagine anybody going through the Vet expenses to have this procedure done.
For the Vets satisfaction that he can save the calf? Again, he knows the calf can be saved so there is no point.
I guess :nod: every once in a while some one will come along thinking. " If I were this calf I would want to be saved"
 

Keren

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I guess my reply is not specific to this calf, but for animals in general. For example, a friend's horse recently went through a barb wire fence, tore off all the flesh on a front leg, now she is treating it and it is slowly healing, but the majority of people have said to both me and her, that they would have just put the horse down immediately, rather than putting the horse through all that pain. Well, I have seen injuries like that before, and I've seen broodmares who have healed up and gone on to breed many foals. So I dont understand the mentality of people who say, the animal is going to be in so much pain during the treatment, why dont we just put it down. And yet, after the pain during the treatment, the animal will lead a relatively normal life :???: I understand euthanasing if there is a bad prognosis, very little chance of recovery. But if the recovery chance is good, then surely the animal would prefer to endure the pain and come out better in the end? I know I would.
 

mnmtranching

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Yes Keren I agree, It just all depends on the situation and the value of the animal. And pets should be given extra consideration.
 

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