Calf wandering

Help Support CattleToday:

Pharmer

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 29, 2004
Messages
105
Reaction score
0
Location
Arkansas
How much time should a 7 day old calf spend away from its mother. I found a calf at the other end of a 100 acre pasture wandering. It's mother was at the other end of the field eating and bahing for the calf? Is this normal?
 

SPRINGER FARMS MURRAY GRE

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2004
Messages
1,434
Reaction score
0
Location
Western Arkansas USA
Could be, sometimes the mother will "hide" them and go off to graze. The calf sometimes likes to "explore" and they get separated, they don't always stay where mama puts them. They will usually come running though at dinner time! ;-) :cboy:
 

TheBullLady

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2004
Messages
3,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Texas
The calf probably laid down with the cows when they were at that end of the pasture, and the cows grazed there way across to the other end without him. As long as the cow is watching for him, he should be fine.
 

Dee

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Messages
560
Reaction score
0
Location
SD
Kinda like the "never seen a dead cat in a tree" theory. Never had a calf starve to death if it could get to mama. Like was already said cows hide their babies sometimes, and I think sometimes hide them so well they kinda forget which clump of tall grass it was supposed to be in.
 

Brad B

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
134
Reaction score
0
Location
North AL
I have one cow that hides her calf. I really like to see them keep them close by. When I see one seperated like that, I drive over where the calf is and bleat like a calf in distress. The momma always comes running like the wind. I figure if the momma stays close then the calf is safer if a coyote comes through the pasture.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
6
Location
MO Ozarks
This past year we had a heifer we dubbed Amelia as in Amelia Airhart. Her mother left her by the single strand hotwire next to the woods. I found her 1/4 mile away after she had wandered through the woods and was exploring the property fence line. Shushed her back to her mother. This was about noon. That evening The cow was standing at the fence were the calf had in theory gone into the woods to bed down. I looked till after dark, had the neighbor kids come over and help to comb th woods, no luck. The next morning the cow was still standing at the same place bellering her head off, still no calf. I started searching agin, checked every patch of woods on the place and had given up. I looked up the hill and there stands the cow feeding the calf. I watched the little turkey, when she finished eating she went down into a deep run off cahnnel and buried herself in a huge multiflora rose. A couple of days later, another calf disappeared and the first place I checked was the MF rose. Sure enough, both of the little turds were curled up in the bush.

dun
 

Wewild

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2004
Messages
3,899
Reaction score
0
Location
GA
Brad B":2i2fwwfv said:
I have one cow that hides her calf. I really like to see them keep them close by. When I see one seperated like that, I drive over where the calf is and bleat like a calf in distress. The momma always comes running like the wind. I figure if the momma stays close then the calf is safer if a coyote comes through the pasture.

Me too. Sound like a calf and our mothers come a running. While bushhoging one day, I saw a coyote attack not 100 feet away. It had attacked the hind quarters to immobilize the calf (found out after inspection). Yelled at the coyote and it ran off a little ways. Made the calf sound and mother came running and the coyote left. I guess the tractor noise keep her from hearing the calf. Good thing I saw it.
 

Wewild

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2004
Messages
3,899
Reaction score
0
Location
GA
Brad B":2wkic6ot said:
Was the calf ok?

He was sore for a day or so. When the coyotes first came back to GA through the DNR (or so I was told) in the late 70's early 80's ( to control the deer population or so I was told) we lost more. The cows now seem to circle the wagons at night but they are not as diligent in the day.
 

Brad B

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
134
Reaction score
0
Location
North AL
That's about when they moved in over here in Northeast AL. Wish they'd move back to where they came from. We really don't have many problems at all with them. Only lost one calf that I can remember, but I still don't like them being around. They do get the cows all stirred up.
 

Wewild

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2004
Messages
3,899
Reaction score
0
Location
GA
Brad B":3m0dsfi3 said:
That's about when they moved in over here in Northeast AL. Wish they'd move back to where they came from. We really don't have many problems at all with them. Only lost one calf that I can remember, but I still don't like them being around. They do get the cows all stirred up.

Your close to me. We ran Commercial Angus crosses until may Dad went with Lim's in the late 70's (from Tinsley Farms down in Layfette AL). Got 20 Red Poll from my Uncle in 1999 from Morgan City Alabama.

War Eagle! or maybe Roll Tide.

Sorry for the off post.
 

Wewild

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2004
Messages
3,899
Reaction score
0
Location
GA
Brad B":3fllxmwu said:
War Eagle! or maybe Roll Tide.

Oh, you better know it's WAR EAGLE!

Dad had X bred stuff in the 70's and early 80's, then went ChiAngus back when I was showing calves, then Limo's for a while, now back to black.[/quote]

I'll get this off the board. I'll PM you. I'm like to know more about the Chiangus.

Those Red Polls came from a Uncle who was a season ticket holder since 1957. I'll be at the Georgia game.

War Eagle.
 

Craig-TX

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 30, 2003
Messages
1,214
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Texas
Herefords are especially prone to hiding their babies.

Speaking of coyotes, I’m wondering if I’ve got a dead calf on my hands after last night. Most any night the coyotes will be howling off and on from some direction and the occasional cow or calf will bawl. Last night they were fairly close to the house, maybe a quarter mile. There were howling up a storm and the cattle were very stirred up. At the climax one of the calves started braying like a donkey. Very strange sounds, really sounded like it was being killed. Lasted about half a minute and then everybody got quiet. Too wet to get back there and check. Would have been too late anyway. I’ll be looking for buzzards today.

Craig-TX
 

TXBobcat

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
782
Reaction score
0
Location
China Spring, TX
Craig-TX":1o0qicu8 said:
Herefords are especially prone to hiding their babies.

Speaking of coyotes, I’m wondering if I’ve got a dead calf on my hands after last night. Most any night the coyotes will be howling off and on from some direction and the occasional cow or calf will bawl. Last night they were fairly close to the house, maybe a quarter mile. There were howling up a storm and the cattle were very stirred up. At the climax one of the calves started braying like a donkey. Very strange sounds, really sounded like it was being killed. Lasted about half a minute and then everybody got quiet. Too wet to get back there and check. Would have been too late anyway. I’ll be looking for buzzards today.

Craig-TX

Funny you mention that. I had the same thing happen the other day. I was in the house right after dark, and my wife was standing outside talking on the phone. All of a sudden she came running in saying something was going on out by the pens (I had two young heifers in there). Most of the other cows/calves were out around the pens also. My wife said she heard lots of coyotes and cows bawling like crazy. I jumped in the truck and drove out there, but didn't see a coyote or any cattle down. Guess the cows fended them off. They were sure milling around like something was going on. That's the closest they've came to the house lately, but I can nearly always here a pack of them sometime after dark in the distance.
 

certherfbeef

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 21, 2004
Messages
3,052
Reaction score
0
Location
OH
Sounds like you all need to refer to the yote wacking thread from a while back!! :shock:
 

sidney411

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 9, 2004
Messages
2,839
Reaction score
1
Location
South Central Texas
I had one 2 week old calf dissapear earlier this year. No sign of the little rascal. No body or buzzards anywhere that I saw. I still don't know what happened to it. I will assume coyotes took it.
 

Campground Cattle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2004
Messages
2,533
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
Craig-TX":3tbkgs60 said:
Herefords are especially prone to hiding their babies.

Speaking of coyotes, I’m wondering if I’ve got a dead calf on my hands after last night. Most any night the coyotes will be howling off and on from some direction and the occasional cow or calf will bawl. Last night they were fairly close to the house, maybe a quarter mile. There were howling up a storm and the cattle were very stirred up. At the climax one of the calves started braying like a donkey. Very strange sounds, really sounded like it was being killed. Lasted about half a minute and then everybody got quiet. Too wet to get back there and check. Would have been too late anyway. I’ll be looking for buzzards today.

Craig-TX

Yotes are very aggressive in the fall trying to feed pups. NOTHING works fool proof hung one in a snare couple nights ago. We use a donkey works pretty good, rifle and traps. When deer hunting if a buck walks out and a coyote or dog we take out the K-9. We have a much bigger problems with feral dogs.
 

TheBullLady

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2004
Messages
3,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Texas
We've never had a problem with a yote taking on a calf. I know there are two schools of thought on this.. one being they won't bother a calf unless it's dead or sick, the other being they are very aggressive and can take down anything.

I'm surprised that your cows get "stirred up" by the yotes. Mine rarely pay much attention to them, although the calves love to chase them when they're going through the pastures.
 
Top