Bull limping

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sidney411

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I just took my bull to the vet because he was limping. The vet said that the insides of his front hooves were cracked and mud had packed in the cracks causing an infection. He cleaned him out and packed with antiobiotic cream and wrapped it up and gave antiobiotic pills. The vet said that it was genetic and would not ever totally heal and the bull would always limp. He said the best thing to do would be to sell him. I am by no means a vet but this seems sort of drastic to me. I have had the bull for 3 years and this is the first time he has ever limped. If it was a genetic problem why is it just showing now that he is almost 5 years old? How do you know that it will keep happening over and over like the vet said? Has anyone had anything like this happen before?

Thanks!
 

D.R. Cattle

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I've noticed problems similar on my bulls before. I figure it was mainly a result of steeping on something jagged or sharp and then getting infected. I dose them with LA200 and haven't had to go any further yet. If it was me and that didn't work, I'd probably go ahead and sell him after giving him a chance. Bulls are so heavy and if they are doing their job, they are spending some time with extra pressure on their feet keeping your cows bred. Probably be an ongoing problem if it's anything more than an infection.
 

Craig-TX

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Don’t know about the genetic part of the question but I would go along with the vet’s advice and sell him after giving him a chance. If he’s five years old he’s getting within two or three years of when we sell ours as a matter of policy. The good news is that it’s his front gear that’s ailing him. That means that, unless he’s limping so bad he’s not staying with the cows, you can sell at your convenience.

Craig-TX
 

PASS

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If this bull does not heal soon I would sell him. Prices for Bulls at the local sale barns are very high now. If you've had him 3 years, chances are you'll get your money back.
 

Campground Cattle

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sidney411":29j137zb said:
I just took my bull to the vet because he was limping. The vet said that the insides of his front hooves were cracked and mud had packed in the cracks causing an infection. He cleaned him out and packed with antiobiotic cream and wrapped it up and gave antiobiotic pills. The vet said that it was genetic and would not ever totally heal and the bull would always limp. He said the best thing to do would be to sell him. I am by no means a vet but this seems sort of drastic to me. I have had the bull for 3 years and this is the first time he has ever limped. If it was a genetic problem why is it just showing now that he is almost 5 years old? How do you know that it will keep happening over and over like the vet said? Has anyone had anything like this happen before?

Thanks!

Sid I have seen this problem several times with older bulls that get to heavy 2000 pounds or more. The hooves start giving them trouble especially always seems it comes own after a wet year.
 
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sidney411

sidney411

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Campground -

I was thinking in the back of my head that it was something to do with it being such a wet year this year. I will keep him locked in the pens for 2 weeks per vets instructions. If he is not better then I will have to decide then. I hate to get rid of him. We apid more for him then any other bull we've bought. He is a registered red brangus and has been one of the best bulls we have had. Throws beautiful calves. The vet said not to keep any of his heifers though. I have had such a time with bulls lately. I guess a lot of their foot problems can be attributed to their heavy weight. It just seems really odd that if it were a genetic problem that it would not have shown up until now. I guess I will see how he looks in a couple of weeks when I can take the bandages off.

Thanks everyone!
 

Campground Cattle

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sidney411":2sn9n7gx said:
Campground -

I was thinking in the back of my head that it was something to do with it being such a wet year this year. I will keep him locked in the pens for 2 weeks per vets instructions. If he is not better then I will have to decide then. I hate to get rid of him. We apid more for him then any other bull we've bought. He is a registered red brangus and has been one of the best bulls we have had. Throws beautiful calves. The vet said not to keep any of his heifers though. I have had such a time with bulls lately. I guess a lot of their foot problems can be attributed to their heavy weight. It just seems really odd that if it were a genetic problem that it would not have shown up until now. I guess I will see how he looks in a couple of weeks when I can take the bandages off.

Thanks everyone!

I am no vet but it being genetic as far as I concerned is BS. My neighbor still has some heifers out my old bull I had problems with. These gals are seven to eight years old no problems. I might be totally off base all the problems I have been with wet ground and weight.
 

la4angus

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He may be thinking that after the insides of the hooves had cracked, they may be hard to heal and keep healed. Possible if they hadn't cracked the first time he would be OK.
I don't know if this makes any sense as far as genetics go, but just a thought.
You may want to ask the vet if this is what he is thinking.
I don't have any idea how he could look at an animal and say that problem could be a genetic defect, without knowing the bloodlines
 

CattleAnnie

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Just remember that if you sell him follow the directions for the amount of time he has to be off medication before he goes. Some antibiotics have quite a long withdrawal period.

Take care.
 

TheBullLady

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I don't know Sidney.. if I liked the bull as well as you like yours, I'd hold on to him for awhile more. It does seem odd that he called it genetic if he's that old and you've never had any previous trouble. Have you kept any of his heifers? I'm assuming you've never had trouble with any of them. It's hard to replace a good bull...
 
A

Anonymous

My Gelbvieh bull had the same problem and the vet gave him a shot of Maxim 200, and told me to pour a solution of clorox and water directly on the hoof. Two days later no problems!
 
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sidney411

sidney411

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Hey Everyone -

Thanks for all of the replys. I was thinking the same things ya'll were. We have quite a few of his heifers and have not had any problems with any of them. We have sold quite a few also and none have had problems except one that came up limping and the vet dug a sticker out of her foot - but it was not the same problem. I have decided to keep him around until I have more of a reason not to, like you said, it is hard to find a good bull that you can get along with. I agree with the whole genetic thing, if it was then why did it only show up on the wettest year we've had him around? Anyway, Thanks to all of You!!!!
 

dun

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Why not ask the vet what the genetic flaw was? It's possible that it's something that only shows up in older animals. The wetter then normal conditions may have just made the problem apparent.

dun
 

bwranch

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Just a thought here. Genetic problems could include conformational issues which can cause, among other things, improper weight distribution on the hooves. If this were the case and the less than optimal conformation were to passed on to daughters, they could suffer early breakdown also.
 
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sidney411

sidney411

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I called the vet and left a message with the secretary to have the vet call me back with the name of the condition, I will post it when I hear from him. I didn't think of the confirmation thing. That is a good point.
 
A

Anonymous

Attributing some state such as a wounded hoof to genetics is baseless unless there is some phenotypical characteristic present such as a malformed hoof, thin hoof, etc... Furthermore, just because a parent carries a gene and shows its phenotype it doesn't necessarily mean that offspring will have the same phenotype. The gene may be recessive or not present in the offpring at all. BTW: Phenotype refers to the gene showing up physically and its only because it either is a dominant gene or the individual carries to recessive genes; one from each parent. A perfect example is eye color in humans.

The study of genetics is quite complex and I have seen many "genetic" claims in the cattle business that are more related to nutrition, environment and upbringing.

Thanks
 
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sidney411

sidney411

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Well, my vet called back and said there is not a specific name, he just called it 'medial cracks on both claws from cornal vein to sole' He said they are beginning to form on his other front foot also. He said it was the same sort of condition as 'corkscrew' in that it is not necessarily an environmental problem, but was not corkscrew. I tried to do some research on the interneton this but didn't come up with anything useful. Does anyone regurally trim their beef cows feet? I found a lot of information on trimming of dairy cattle feet on at least a yearly basis, hmmm.
 

dun

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sidney411":vbrpgpw4 said:
Well, my vet called back and said there is not a specific name, he just called it 'medial cracks on both claws from cornal vein to sole' He said they are beginning to form on his other front foot also. He said it was the same sort of condition as 'corkscrew' in that it is not necessarily an environmental problem, but was not corkscrew. I tried to do some research on the interneton this but didn't come up with anything useful. Does anyone regurally trim their beef cows feet? I found a lot of information on trimming of dairy cattle feet on at least a yearly basis, hmmm.

Dairy cattle are regularly on a different fotting then beef cows that's a good share of the problem with them. Also, so many of them are really pushed with a lot of grain which also contributes.
Screwclaw is a genetic trait. I've only seen it in a few cows and only about the time they reached 4-5 years old. Some of the daughters had the same problem, some don't.

dun
 

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