Bull-in and numbers question

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SRBeef

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If you want a bull to breed about 20 cows is it best to split them up? Put him with 10 first then bring in the rest or just put him with all 20 at once. Seems like putting a bull in with 20 cows at one time on some of them you are going to miss their first cycle.

Would overall there be a tighter calving period for each group if the were split rather than put him in all at once?

Looking for tight calving period(s). Jim
 

jcarkie

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why would he miss cows that are in? 20 is a good number for any bull 2 or older. unless you knew which 10 would come in at what time, you would miss more by seperating them. put all 20 with the bull and let him do his job. i have seen bulls handle 2 or 3 cows in at the same time.
 

angie1

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jcarkie":2cwn3iqd said:
why would he miss cows that are in? 20 is a good number for any bull 2 or older. unless you knew which 10 would come in at what time, you would miss more by seperating them. put all 20 with the bull and let him do his job. i have seen bulls handle 2 or 3 cows in at the same time.
I would second this. He will be fine. :nod:
 

hillsdown

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The only way I would split them is if I synced the groups and even then there is no point of splitting as he will only breed those in heat. If you want a tight group sync 5 at a time to come into heat so you have 4 groups; all of your cows should be bred in a tight group and those that didn't take upon first breeding will be in heat again in a tight group as well..Thus short breeding season, theoretically..
 
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SRBeef

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Thank you for the replies and information. I guess all at once makes sense. This is more cows than last year and I don't want to lose the nice tight calving season.

But another question: Does it help to keep the cows and bull in a smaller pasture for breeding? right now I have the bull and cows in a smaller pasture because of my rotation. I was wondering if it helps to give them more room at breeding time or to keep them closer together? By larger I mean a 40 acre field. Right now they are on one much smaller. Not very private but he doesn't have to look far for a date.

Any benefit to tight calving season one way or the other?

Jim
 

dun

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If your cows and bull are typical, the giorls will pretty much stay fairly close together and the bull will be close enough to keep and eye and nose on them.
 

KNERSIE

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40 acres isn't big by any means, but generally the smaller and easier to travel a pasture is the better for breeding purposes. A cow in season will go look for a bull and she'll find him in 40 acres. An experienced bull like yours can handle quite a few cows in a day, its usually yearling bulls that fall in love with a single cow for a few days.
 

Angus Cowman

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SRBeef":3prxntam said:
Thank you for the replies and information. I guess all at once makes sense. This is more cows than last year and I don't want to lose the nice tight calving season.

But another question: Does it help to keep the cows and bull in a smaller pasture for breeding? right now I have the bull and cows in a smaller pasture because of my rotation. I was wondering if it helps to give them more room at breeding time or to keep them closer together? By larger I mean a 40 acre field. Right now they are on one much smaller. Not very private but he doesn't have to look far for a date.

Any benefit to tight calving season one way or the other?
Jim
benefits are more uniform calves at weaning and selling,less labor and stress on you because cows calve and get it over with in a shorter time and it also shows you which cows are the easiest to breed so you can judge fertility in them
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Jim - I totally agree with the previous comments. Give him all 20. You have them grouped about as tight as anyone could imagine already - so they will be cycling & ready for him. You shouldn't lose your tight season - unless a cow has a problem.
 

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