bull calf and newborns

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Anonymous

My grade hereford is about to have her second calf. Her first calf, a bull, is still in the pasture with her, he is not ten months old yet. There is only one other calf in the pasture ( a steer), and a horse. Do you think the bull calf is a danger to the newborn? Also, the cow seems to have weaned her firstborn, as I haven't seen him nurse for a month or so. Should I put up electric fence to separate them?
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Anonymous

Sharon, I would definitely separate them. The bull calf hasn't been weaned long enough to be able to depend on him not nursing once his mother's milk comes in. The new baby will need all the colostrum to itself. <p>He also will probably be old enough to worry about him breeding his mother once she calves. That should be a major concern.<p>Most breeders wean their calves about 205 days in order to allow the mother to build up her condition in anticipation of giving birth and feeding a new calf. Nine or ten months of nursing is a long time.
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Anonymous

(User Above)":17sx9n4c said:
: My grade hereford is about to have her second calf. Her first calf, a bull, is still in the pasture with her, he is not ten months old yet. There is only one other calf in the pasture ( a steer), and a horse. Do you think the bull calf is a danger to the newborn? Also, the cow seems to have weaned her firstborn, as I haven't seen him nurse for a month or so. Should I put up electric fence to separate them?<p>Definitely separate them! I've had yearling heifers try to nurse my fresh cows after they've been weaned for 6 months. Also you will end up with your cow bred to her son if they're not separated.
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