broken legs and blind

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plumber_greg

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Please give me some advice. I have two calves with broken legs. One was born with a back leg broken and healed at a 90 degree angle. Found the other just now. I also have a blind calf that was born that way. My pastures are in about 5 acre paddocks and I am not wanting to move them anymore, cuz' that is a pain. I am thinking that I want to wean them, but I am not experinced at early weaning. All I'm gonna' do is butcher them. They have been on creep feed since they were born about Feb. 15. I don't know weather to leave them with their mommas on some grass with an extra bull in case they are not yet bred, or dry lot them. I don't always take the time to be sure the one cripple and blind I had were alright, so another ain't gonna' help. I don't know what to feed them if I wean them, how much, or for how long. I have nover had this come up, so it proves the law of averages teaches us all something. It seems the cripple that was born is moving slower than he use to. Thanks in advance for any advice or comments. gs
 

hillsdown

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The one you just found how old is it and where is the break ?

If they are 4 months old you can ween them and continue with the creep as long as they are eating grain already. Talk to a nutritionist to get them on a finishing program.
 
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plumber_greg

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hillsdown":3a2sn6d1 said:
The one you just found how old is it and where is the break ?

If they are 4 months old you can ween them and continue with the creep as long as they are eating grain already. Talk to a nutritionist to get them on a finishing program.
They are all the same age and the new break is between the back knee or hock or whatever that is and the hip. I am worried that in a small lot they may go down on me without exersize, and in a bigger lot they won't come up to eat. The one with the old break is moving slower as he is really a good calf. Maybe veal is the answer, Keren. Never tried it. What do you do with it? I'm a t-bone guy. Thanks gs
 

hillsdown

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We have done pit roasts as well will the smaller ones. Maybe have a party and have a pit roast for your friends. The one with the break needs to be put down asap so either eat it or bury it that is a break that will not heal nor can have a cast, also the calf is in a lot of pain.



The one with the previously broken leg may not be able to withstand weight gain and still support itself. But the blind one will do well if kept in a small area and does not have to forage for food.
 
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plumber_greg

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hillsdown":396cyxwq said:
We have done pit roasts as well will the smaller ones. Maybe have a party and have a pit roast for your friends. The one with the break needs to be put down asap so either eat it or bury it that is a break that will not heal nor can have a cast, also the calf is in a lot of pain.



The one with the previously broken leg may not be able to withstand weight gain and still support itself. But the blind one will do well if kept in a small area and does not have to forage for food.
I actually thought about throwing a party and having a pit roast. But I don't know the first thing about a pit roast. Are you talking about putting him on a stick and turning him over a open fire? Sorry to be so dumb about that, but in Nw Missouri it not commonly done. Talked to my processor today and he explained about the difference between veal and real meat. He said that one guy had a calf born with a broken leg, invested a lot of money and time feeding it, but when he butchered it. it wasn't really a very good eating beef. He said to feed it for thirty days, then it will be out of the veal stage, and harvest it then. Looked at the newly hurt calf tonite and you are right, he is in a lot of pain so I may butcher him or shoot him really quick. Thanks gs
 

redcountry

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A couple of years ago we had a calf born on pasture completly blind , the day I found it I had nothing with me to put it out of its misery so left it with its mother.
When I came back later No calf to be found, I looked the whole pasture but no calf Well I thought that saved me a unlikeable job and put it out of my mind.

A week later I noticed the cow spending a lot of time near one side of the pasture when the herd was not there , a couple of days later I saw a calf get up from some tall grass and she went to it and it started to nurse.

I went straight to the cow and there was the blinb calf, the cow took off across the field with the calf running along side with its nose tight to mothers side.
That calf stayed with the cow in the pasture until fall than it was weaned and went through the system like any other calf.
 

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