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Broadcasting Clover

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jhambley

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First let me say I'm new to all of this. I purchased 20 acres in east central Kansas that had been planted in soy beans for several years. Last spring I started my pasture using a mix of oats and brome. We cut the oats and the brome took off nicely and I want to add clover this year. Can I just use a broadcast spreader? Any suggests on clover mix and application rates? I think I remember my county ext. agent saying that late Feburary or ealier March was the best time.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Jerry
 

Nowland Farms

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Jerry,

I just put out 75lbs of white clover in my pasture 14 acre. I could have used the broadcast spreader on the tractor but chose to use the 4wheeler and the small Moultrie broadcase spreader on the 4wheeler.

The clover seed are so small (about 650,000 to 700,000 per pound) that I felt I could get a better coverage with the smaller spreader.

The bag called for 3-5 lbs per acre and planting dates of Feb-Mar.

I've had plenty of rain on it, just waiting for those nice warm sunny 60 degree days to return.

Hope this helps.
 

Beefy

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AAAAAAAAAGHHHHHHHHHHH! i thought you were supposed to plant clover in the fall. ive been wanting to plant some but thought it was too late. thanks folks.
 

Nowland Farms

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Beefy,

My best suggestion to you is to read the back of the bag or do a web search for the type of clover you are going to plant. I planted a combination of the "Durrano" and "Patorit" brands of white clover by Pennington Seed.

Here in the South there are 2 planting dates. One in the fall and the other in the spring. Best to see what your area calls for on the back of the bag.
 

stocky

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I just seeded a combination of pre-inoculated clover, Red, Alsike, and Ladino. I seeded with the 4 wheeler and put on 10 lbs per acre on 25 acres of bottom land that I sowed in rye, orchard grass, and fescue last fall. February is a good month to broadcast clover, here.
 

dun

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Winter/ frost seeding clover is easy if you have decent conditions. You need relatively short grass, some soil moisture and some freeze and tha.wt. Broadcast at a rate of arond 5-6 lbs per acre for white/ladino and 3-4 per acre for red.

dun
 
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jhambley

jhambley

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Thanks for all your replies!

I don't have a four wheeler...just a small tractor and I haven't bought the spreader yet. I guess I'll head down to the feed store
and see what they have. Maybe a mix of red and white?

Jerry
 

dun

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jhambley":2nli58re said:
Thanks for all your replies!

I don't have a four wheeler...just a small tractor and I haven't bought the spreader yet. I guess I'll head down to the feed store
and see what they have. Maybe a mix of red and white?

Jerry

A mix works fine. All you need is a pto driven broadcast seeder. A word to the wise, mess around with the flow control on it and insure you can choke it down enough for clover. I saved money on ours and after a couple of years it was so sloppy it wouldn;t shut off or choke down enough for small seed. An extra 75 bucks would have gotten me one that would have lasted. And if it's metal, wash it off thoroughly when you're done. Surprising how seed chaff and fertilizer dust can attract enough moisture to rust them up pretty badly

dun
 

denoginnizer

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I wash mine off good after every use and spray it down with penertrating oil. Fertilizer left on the spreader will ruin it.
 

sillco

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jhambley":34n3c060 said:
Thanks for all your replies!

I don't have a four wheeler...just a small tractor and I haven't bought the spreader yet. I guess I'll head down to the feed store
and see what they have. Maybe a mix of red and white?

Jerry

I have always added sand or light soil to my seed and mixed well. This will allow the seed to be spread evenely and assure to have enough to do the whole pasture before running out.
Oh you may have to go over some areas twice because you have some left over, but it works.
 

johndeerefarmer

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Here in Texas we plant it in the fall. Usually the same time as rye grass. It will give a little growth during the winter but comes on strong when it gets warmer in late Feb and March.

I use yuchi arrowleaf clover. If you let some of it go to seed you will not have to replant but every couple of years.

I also made the mistake one year of planting it too thick and choking out my coastal until the clover was finished growing for the season.
 

sillco

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johndeerefarmer":oak5dy5h said:
Here in Texas we plant it in the fall. Usually the same time as rye grass. It will give a little growth during the winter but comes on strong when it gets warmer in late Feb and March.

I use yuchi arrowleaf clover. If you let some of it go to seed you will not have to replant but every couple of years.

I also made the mistake one year of planting it too thick and choking out my coastal until the clover was finished growing for the season.

When I was ranching in East Texas and Northwest Louisiana I used both arrowleaf and crimson. The crimson matured in April and the arrowleaf matured in late June and early July. While the additional grazing was good it did knock back the coastal.
When the clover would start seeding out I removed the cows so the seed could mature, about the first or second week of May for crimson. When the seeds were ready to fall from the plant, I would adjust my bushhog at the height of the seed heads and mow the pasture to spread the seeds. I was able to maintain the stand for over ten years and never had to reseed.
 

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