british white

Help Support CattleToday:

russoniellov1

Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2005
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
Location
miami
what do you guys think of british whites , they look mighty fine, is it worth my time to start a pure bred operation, or maybe just cross them on angus cows.
 

jcarkie

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2003
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
0
Location
arkansas
they are good cows and excellent mothers. i have one problem they pass the spotted coat for a long time. and you get discounted at the sale because they tend to look like longhorns.
 

Campground Cattle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2004
Messages
2,533
Reaction score
2
Location
East Texas
russoniellov1":1ax8rri8 said:
what do you guys think of british whites , they look mighty fine, is it worth my time to start a pure bred operation, or maybe just cross them on angus cows.

I sold all of mine last fall can't compete with the Hereford on the money end, nice gentle easy keepers they just are not a known breed and it hurt's you. There is a fairly large operation about 15 miles from me a seedstock producer. They got rid of all there Angus they were crossing with the White's . The Angus and Whites produce a skunk pattern. So to the remark Angus cross well with everything they don't.
My opinion they are good cattle easy to work and keep there breed assc. needs to throw some money at advertising to get them more well known.
 

Jason W

Active member
Joined
Jan 29, 2004
Messages
35
Reaction score
0
Location
Illinois
I assume they are the same as what they call white park 's around here. I bought a 3rd stage 6 yr old cow last week, bred to an angus bull. she seems to have a good temperment, and they sold last years calf at the sale too. He was black and looked good.
 

jcarkie

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2003
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
0
Location
arkansas
the calf in my avatar's mom was 7/8 gelbvieh and a little white park or british whute and was a red skunk pattern, excellent cow though.
100_0412.jpg
[/img]
 

stocky

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Messages
1,460
Reaction score
0
Location
sw missouri
My Dad has about 90 of the white parks/british whites. They are excellent milkers and mothers. The only bull that will take the markings out is the charlois bull. With charlois, the calves will be an off-white to yellow with some dirty colored ears, but not real noticeable. These calves are big and stretchy and sell very well at the auction. We have tried angus, hereford, and limousin but the british marking still show up in about 40-50 percent of the cattle. I will buy a good british white every time I see her at an auction. They have become popular enough here that the price has gone way up to where the other cattle are. I paid 840 for a heifer the other day and there were only a few of the better angus that outsold her. She outsold the other breeds. We are selling about 25 of charlois cross this week and they will average a little over 600 lbs right off the cow, which isnt bad here for winter calves in a bad drought
 

Jwest

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2004
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Location
South East Texas Piney Woods
Being a breeder of British White cattle and having crossed 10 registered Angus cattle more than once with a British White bull in my early years of building my herd, I feel I must comment on the thread regarding the color result of the cross.

You DO NOT always get a black calf or a black calf with a white line back. Many of my resulting crosses were perfectly marked as a British White, and that includes male and female calves, and NONE were solid black. Many of the bulls were placed into commercial bull service.

That linebacked marking is not just the impact of the Angus coming through. In the very ancient history of this breed, line back markings are pervasive and part of this breed. You will almost never, and I never, got a perfectly black calf from the cross of Angus and British White. The British White dominates the cross, thus you either get the lineback marking are a white calf that is classic British White. The resulting calves from Angus/BW X heifers will most likely be classically marked British White, but there's no guarantee. As with a highly purebred British White, or even the pairing of two American Fullblood British White's, you can get the lineback marking. It is one of the oldest markings of cattle in the history of the world, you will find it in the ancient cave paintings of thousands of years ago, and it is a pervasive trate that recurs in the polled British White and in the horned White Park.

You can calm down an Angus with the British White Cross, and certainly in a commercial operation, you will get excellent replacement calves from the cross and saleable commercial bulls as well as excellent beef steers.

I would like to see someone cross some registered Brahmins with a British white bull and see the resulting coloration and disposition. I think it would become something very commercially viable, and I'd be willing to provide a bull to accomplish that.

There isn't much reason to use Angus anymore to cross with the British white, while the resulting calves are good, mine certainly were, but there are more purebred British White calves and older females available now so the need to cross to create a herd in the long term is not really necessary. I chose Angus because their body style and beef quality were comparable and I wanted to retain strong color points in my British whites, which wouldn't have happened with a cross with something like a Charloais. But, if you recognize their potential to bring a gentle nature to your herd and interesting coloration that your buyers will like, I think crossing with female Brahmins is an interesting direction to go in.

http://www.texasbritishwhitecattle.com
 

Australian Cattleman

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 29, 2004
Messages
1,380
Reaction score
1
Location
Tenterfield,New England Region NSW,Australia
We have a couple of breeders not too far from us. The cattle are very quiet,good milkers,they cross well with dairy breeds,have small calves. I have seen them crossed with Holsteins and South Devon,nice fleshy progeny. I would agree that there would be a discount for the variable colour. Which is ridiculous even if the animal is good. You can't eat colour.
 

Caustic Burno

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2004
Messages
28,094
Reaction score
3,622
Location
Big Thicket East Texas
Jwest":1ioeitgz said:
Being a breeder of British White cattle and having crossed 10 registered Angus cattle more than once with a British White bull in my early years of building my herd, I feel I must comment on the thread regarding the color result of the cross.

You DO NOT always get a black calf or a black calf with a white line back. Many of my resulting crosses were perfectly marked as a British White, and that includes male and female calves, and NONE were solid black. Many of the bulls were placed into commercial bull service.

That linebacked marking is not just the impact of the Angus coming through. In the very ancient history of this breed, line back markings are pervasive and part of this breed. You will almost never, and I never, got a perfectly black calf from the cross of Angus and British White. The British White dominates the cross, thus you either get the lineback marking are a white calf that is classic British White. The resulting calves from Angus/BW X heifers will most likely be classically marked British White, but there's no guarantee. As with a highly purebred British White, or even the pairing of two American Fullblood British White's, you can get the lineback marking. It is one of the oldest markings of cattle in the history of the world, you will find it in the ancient cave paintings of thousands of years ago, and it is a pervasive trate that recurs in the polled British White and in the horned White Park.

You can calm down an Angus with the British White Cross, and certainly in a commercial operation, you will get excellent replacement calves from the cross and saleable commercial bulls as well as excellent beef steers.

I would like to see someone cross some registered Brahmins with a British white bull and see the resulting coloration and disposition. I think it would become something very commercially viable, and I'd be willing to provide a bull to accomplish that.

There isn't much reason to use Angus anymore to cross with the British white, while the resulting calves are good, mine certainly were, but there are more purebred British White calves and older females available now so the need to cross to create a herd in the long term is not really necessary. I chose Angus because their body style and beef quality were comparable and I wanted to retain strong color points in my British whites, which wouldn't have happened with a cross with something like a Charloais. But, if you recognize their potential to bring a gentle nature to your herd and interesting coloration that your buyers will like, I think crossing with female Brahmins is an interesting direction to go in.

http://www.texasbritishwhitecattle.com

Ruby this could be a heck of an Idea put a good White bull on Red Brammers. British breed of Angus, Herf quality to make an F-1 momma from heaven that might be calmer than the other crosses. She is offering up a bull also.
 

Jwest

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2004
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Location
South East Texas Piney Woods
Actually, it is my understanding that the rodeo bucking bulls you see that are white with black points come from a line of bucking bulls developed many, many years ago. I would made an educated guess that a horned White Park, rather than a polled British White, was used back then in the establishment of that line of bucking bulls.

The color pattern of the British White/White Park is dominant in the genes of any resulting cross animal and should always continue to show up in the calves from such a line. The color pattern is above actual color in the DNA chain.

The only cow I've crossed with that has given me something besides classic British White markings or classic lineback markings is a big commercial Brangus/Holstein cross. She has had nothing but heifers for me and each one is splotched with black and white color across their bodies and quite eye-catching, and they've each had Brahmin ears, and her body style, but downsized a bit. Basically, the black points are there, but the body is full of splotches of color, reminiscent of some Longhorns you see.
 

Latest posts

Top