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Breeding heifers

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Anonymous

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I got into a discussion last week about selecting a bull to breed heifers. One point of view was to select a bull by "breed", in this case Waygu to breed to Brangus type heifers, because of calving ease traits. My view was selecting a "hiefer" bull using known genetics and obtain similiar calving ease potential. Point being: IF Waygu sired calves are docked when sold (and I don't know that to be a fact), why not select a Brangus/Angus bull with heifer EPD's from a reputable source, pay alittle more for the bull, and have a more desireable calf, and hopefully less dock in price. conclusion: Do we select according to breed or known genetic traits???

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Anonymous

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If your looking for a train wreck select a heifer bull soley on breed. No breed can be considered totally low birthweight, take for example the guy that had a 130lb calf from a longhorn bull. Go get an Angus bull with a BW EPD under 1.5, you might have to spend $1500 or more but in the end you'll have quality marketable calves that will pay for the bull when it's time to sell. You'll also sleep a lot better during calving season.

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Anonymous

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when you select a bull by breed, you select for the average traits of that breed, when you select by genetic traits, you select for specific traits of a specific animal. the first one is done in the beginning of a low cost breeding program or in the middle ages, the second one is done by anyone who wants to be sure of the quality that he will get.

so go for the bull with a sound genetic reputation from the breed that will be most profitable for you, but make sure his epd's are accurate for your purpose. i wouldn't go for the wagyu, they're silly cattle anyways.

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Anonymous

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I agree with both of you. So I can tell the other person the vote is now 3-0. Using known genetics is the only way to go. Thanks folks.

> when you select a bull by breed,
> you select for the average traits
> of that breed, when you select by
> genetic traits, you select for
> specific traits of a specific
> animal. the first one is done in
> the beginning of a low cost
> breeding program or in the middle
> ages, the second one is done by
> anyone who wants to be sure of the
> quality that he will get.

> so go for the bull with a sound
> genetic reputation from the breed
> that will be most profitable for
> you, but make sure his epd's are
> accurate for your purpose. i
> wouldn't go for the wagyu, they're
> silly cattle anyways.



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Anonymous

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Some good points, except one. I realize your comment about a 130# calf from a Longhorn Bull was an "example." On the other hand, among hundreds of Longhorn breeders and tens of thousands of calves from Longhorns, the AVERAGE weight range for calves from Longhorn Cattle is 50 to 65 lbs. The 130# calf was definitely a fluke. And, something else got into the gene pool. Getting a calf weighing over 80 lbs from a good Longhorn is like a cow having triplets and all living through it well.
 
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Anonymous

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But why would you want to breed good cattle to an inferior breed like longhorns when your can get just as much calving ease out of a buyer accepted breed such as Angus?

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Anonymous

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i know alot angus calves that came by pulling, i have pulled angus calves too!! it is less likely with longhorn but i am sure some have pulled them too. check birthweight of cattle for heifers
> But why would you want to breed
> good cattle to an inferior breed
> like longhorns when your can get
> just as much calving ease out of a
> buyer accepted breed such as
> Angus?
 
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Anonymous

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A note on Longhorns: While there are some 250,000 cattle with papers stating they are Texas Longhorns, less than 5% can pass a bloodtest for breed purity today. The old-type Longhorns are a lean-beef, range-hardy breed that performs best under tough conditions. They make good heifer bulls, but simply locating a Longhorn bull from a clean bloodline takes a bit of effort. The mut-mix "longhorns" have given the breed an undeserved bad reputation.

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