breeding for beef

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

hello all,

I am interested in getting into the business of breeding cattle for beef. I would like to start out very small, one bull and a couple of heifers with calves on their side. I work for someone in the restaurant and catering business and would like to breed for high quality beef, Angus and preferably Wagyu which seems to be fairly rare (wagyu). I have bred and raised quarter horses but I understand that cattle can be entirely different. I would like to produce them as feeder cattle. I don't have much land, only 27 acres in the southeast area. It is a warm climate and I hear that the warm weather isn't good for feeder cattle, they tend to not want to eat, is that true?. I would like to get some opinions on the economics of this endeavor. I am not really looking to take them to a sale for profit unless the quality of the carcass is not good enough to keep. I also don't know if it is wise to start out with a bull or just buy some heifers and AI them until I get going. How much beef would I get out of an average cow that can be used for selective cuts?
I am sorry if these questions sound a bit ridiculous but I am very green at this and I have to start somewhere : )

Thanks for any insight offered!!
 
OP
A

Anonymous

1000# cow = 350# of retail cuts in the case. A packing house won't waste a thing tho.
 

MrBilly

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2004
Messages
617
Reaction score
0
Location
Mid-Georgia
I don't think I would get a bull. You can lease them, which I do not like since who knows what diseases they may carry? AI is realtively cheap and there is no up keep of another animal that is only used for a couple months, but you are looking at not getting all bred the first time by AI even in the best hands.

You are looking at 32-36% of live wt as retail product that is boneless and with 1/4inch fat trim.

As for the cows, try to get the best ones you can and with Angus you can look up their data as to carcass quality. Since you want to sell the meat, you want the most retail product, rib eye and we like to get those that will marble well. Similarly, with Angus and other breeds you can select AI sires based on the carcass merit you want by studying the EPDs on the breed website.

Takes about 15 months from birth to slaughter, so you will need to watch the number of cattle you have on your limited acreage. We grain fed our yearlings for slaughter starting in the fall and try to finish in the spring before it gets too hot. In our hands it takes about six months of grain feeding to get them finished the way we want them. Trying to feed in the summer is a very slow process, since they tend to eat less.

Good Luck. :cboy:

Billy
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Thanks for the info!
I agree it is probably best to lease the bull in my situation. Although, I will keep in mind to have it vet checked for disease first, if that is possible.
What are the general rates to lease a bull for the breeding season?
Is there a website available that will let me view a contract aggreement beforehand?

MrBilly":3rx4jocv said:
I don't think I would get a bull. You can lease them, which I do not like since who knows what diseases they may carry? AI is realtively cheap and there is no up keep of another animal that is only used for a couple months, but you are looking at not getting all bred the first time by AI even in the best hands.

You are looking at 32-36% of live wt as retail product that is boneless and with 1/4inch fat trim.

As for the cows, try to get the best ones you can and with Angus you can look up their data as to carcass quality. Since you want to sell the meat, you want the most retail product, rib eye and we like to get those that will marble well. Similarly, with Angus and other breeds you can select AI sires based on the carcass merit you want by studying the EPDs on the breed website.

Takes about 15 months from birth to slaughter, so you will need to watch the number of cattle you have on your limited acreage. We grain fed our yearlings for slaughter starting in the fall and try to finish in the spring before it gets too hot. In our hands it takes about six months of grain feeding to get them finished the way we want them. Trying to feed in the summer is a very slow process, since they tend to eat less.

Good Luck. :cboy:

Billy
 

Latest posts

Top