Breeders Responsibility?

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Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Msscamp - I think you are off base.
Slick did realize she was pregnant weeks before she calves (see first post). She probably did not show imminant signs as young as she was. He got assistance for her at the time of delivery.
And - YES - it is the sellers responsibility.
 

CKC1586

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slick4591":2p3kczmg said:
I spent about half an hour talking with the breeder when I was picking her up. He told that the same thing has happened to him... twice, only he didn't get squat out of it. He adopted his thinking out of those two incidents and this is why he made good on the replacement. HD, I think I'm leaving it alone now and chalking it up to a life lesson. I will be loading her and getting her vet checked in the next few days out of caution.

Thanks for the compliments!

Cindy, I guess I'm really confused because there are web sites around stating that they are early maturing, and then a couple call them later maturing. All of my girls were being ridden (cycling?) within eight months of age, so I figured the early maturing camp was correct. I have two that will be ready for Bryson at the end of next month. One of the others is getting over a respiratory infection and will go in with him as soon as she's back in shape. The last will see him in September.
Has been my experience that if you wait till that heifer is at least 18 months to breed her you will have better success (she will) at calving. Also these girls will produce into their teens. I agree about some of the written stuff being confusing....
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Not calving at 24 months of age is a totally different subject. But, stating you wait til they are 18 months would only work for people that calved year round.
In this day & age of management, cattle should be ready to breed at 14-15 months old. Time is money. Cattle cycle based on their body weight vs mature weight. If grown out properly, they should easily breed for 2 years of age.
Some people prefer calving at 2.5 yrs of age - but they calve spring & fall.
 
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slick4591

slick4591

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msscamp":244jveam said:
Got a question for you slick4591. When are you going to accept your responsibility in all of this? It's hard to miss when a heifer is bagging up, as well as getting loose and sloppy behind. If you had been paying attention to this heifer you should have known she was bred. If you're new to cattle, you should have done your homework and you should have been watching her. Had you done that, you would have known she was in trouble, could have gotten her to the vet, they could have probably done a C-section and saved at least the heifer - if not both the heifer and the calf. Animal ownership is a 2 way street and you also have some responsibility to shoulder in this situation. There are no guarantees when it comes to buying animals in this situation - be nice happens. Be thankful that the previous owner even offered to replace the heifer. He didn't have to.

No need for formalities here. You can just call me Slick.

Yes, I am new to the cattle biz, but believe me, I accept the fact that I waited too long. I should have hit her with lute the day I unloaded her. Like I said in my first post the light went on about two or three weeks prior and that was because of her size, not because she was bagging up. Her bag size had increased a little, but not nearly as large as I would expect one in milk would get.

Either my brother or I check our cattle daily and there was nothing to indicate she was in labor the evening before. I found her around noon the next day. This heifer walked into the trailer and took a ride to the vet while still alive, unloaded and walked in the chute alive and that's when she was turned over to the professionals. They decided on a pull and things went to he77 in a handbasket from there. I guess I could have told them that I insisted they do a C-section from the start, but I pay them good money for their knowledge and experience, so it was their call.

And, yes, I agree with you. Shyyt does happen.
 

Isomade

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":2fx8rzfh said:
Msscamp - I think you are off base.
Slick did realize she was pregnant weeks before she calves (see first post). She probably did not show imminant signs as young as she was. He got assistance for her at the time of delivery.
And - YES - it is the sellers responsibility.
I agree Jeanne. It's always a good idea to read a thread from start to finish before posting.
 
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