Branson Tractors.....

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jltrent

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We have a dealer here and I was wondering if anybody out there had any feedback on them. They have a good looking 80hp 50 series. Our local dealer is Mcpherson's Farm Equipment in our county. From my understanding their engines are Cummins...Other Korean tractor brands are Kioti and LS. We have dealers pretty close on these and several Kioti tractors in service close by.

Branson Tractor was founded in the US in 1998 as a tractor distribution company. Kukje Machinery in South Korea is their parent company and has been in business since 1968. Branson Tractor now has 165 dealerships in the United States and Canada.
Branson Tractors has three warehouses. The Rome, Georgia location not only has a warehouse, assembly and distribution center, it is also the Corporate Office. Another warehouse, assembly and distribution center is located in Plainview, Texas and North Plains, Oregon.
Branson Tractors has tractors ranging in horsepower from 19 to 80. The 05 series has the 1905H tractor with 19 horsepower. The 00 series tractors have 2 models available with manual transmission or hydrostatic transmission. The 15 series has 8 models available in manual and hydrostatic tranmission with 30, 35, 40, and 48 horsepower. Their 20 series tractors have 12 models with a choice of manual or hydromax transmission, and ROPs or CAB available with air conditioned and heated cabs. There is also a model available with a cab and heat only for the Northern States. The 25 series has 8 models available in manual and hydrostatic transmisson with ROPs and Cab models with horsepower of 37 & 42. The 7845 model Branson Tractor is available in ROPS or Cab models. And the 8050 finishes off the models. Each model has a loader and backhoe available as well.


http://www.bransontractor.com/Home.aspx

gYNDBPh.jpg
 

True Grit Farms

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The 8050 doesn't have a 4b Cummins, 3500 cc isn't much of an engine for a 80 hp tractor. Otherwise the tractor looks good. I thought going with a Kubota tractor was risky in the service department.
 

bird dog

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Resale value is not very good. I ask a local Case/Kubota dealer about them, I guy I trust and he says he will not take them in on trade. Kioti's either.
 

True Grit Farms

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Caustic Burno":3olk4pyx said:
Kioti pretty popular here only know of one Branson. Got to remember they all break down and need parts sooner or later.

I have a 1963 model 3020 and a 1968 model 1020 and use the 1020 almost daily. Can't see any new tractor standing the test of time. But JL has a 7.3 Ford with less than 40k miles, unless TT talked hin out of it.
 
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jltrent

jltrent

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True Grit Farms":3czv3lip said:
The 8050 doesn't have a 4b Cummins, 3500 cc isn't much of an engine for a 80 hp tractor. Otherwise the tractor looks good. I thought going with a Kubota tractor was risky in the service department.

I noticed the cc's also 3409 cc = 208 cubic inch for 80hp, pretty small. (A M9540 95hp Kubota has 230 cubic inch) I have tried to find more info on the engines.

In 1995, Kukje established its diesel engine manufacturing plant, and in 2002 established an agreement with Cummins to build and supply engines for them. So the rumors are true, Branson tractors have an A series Cummins Diesel as their power plant, but how good is it as it sure isn't the 4b Cummins.
 
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jltrent

jltrent

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True Grit Farms":3j7jztmp said:
Caustic Burno":3j7jztmp said:
Kioti pretty popular here only know of one Branson. Got to remember they all break down and need parts sooner or later.

I have a 1963 model 3020 and a 1968 model 1020 and use the 1020 almost daily. Can't see any new tractor standing the test of time. But JL has a 7.3 Ford with less than 40k miles, unless TT talked hin out of it.

Nothing is going to ever replace those old Deere's...I wish the newer ones was as simple, durable, dependable, plenty of parts, resale value, etc. etc. etc. as they are. It is not going to happen. Nice tractors.
 

True Grit Farms

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jltrent":30g46pcw said:
True Grit Farms":30g46pcw said:
The 8050 doesn't have a 4b Cummins, 3500 cc isn't much of an engine for a 80 hp tractor. Otherwise the tractor looks good. I thought going with a Kubota tractor was risky in the service department.

I noticed the cc's also 3409 cc = 208 cubic inch for 80hp, pretty small. (A M9540 95hp Kubota has 230 cubic inch) I have tried to find more info on the engines.

In 1995, Kukje established its diesel engine manufacturing plant, and in 2002 established an agreement with Cummins to build and supply engines for them. So the rumors are true, Branson tractors have an A series Cummins Diesel as their power plant, but how good is it as it sure isn't the 4b Cummins.

My Kubota has the 230 ci engine and it's weak on torque for breaking land.
 
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jltrent

jltrent

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Caustic Burno":1asmsuvr said:
Kioti pretty popular here only know of one Branson. Got to remember they all break down and need parts sooner or later.
They would have to be entry level cheap to buy as parts and resale is not there yet, but I remember the same with Kubota and Japan cars. They probably can, but I can't tell a Korean from a Japanese.
 

Texasmark

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jltrent":1zouk50i said:
We have a dealer here and I was wondering if anybody out there had any feedback on them. They have a good looking 80hp 50 series. Our local dealer is Mcpherson's Farm Equipment in our county. From my understanding their engines are Cummins...Other Korean tractor brands are Kioti and LS. We have dealers pretty close on these and several Kioti tractors in service close by.

Branson Tractor was founded in the US in 1998 as a tractor distribution company. Kukje Machinery in South Korea is their parent company and has been in business since 1968. Branson Tractor now has 165 dealerships in the United States and Canada.
Branson Tractors has three warehouses. The Rome, Georgia location not only has a warehouse, assembly and distribution center, it is also the Corporate Office. Another warehouse, assembly and distribution center is located in Plainview, Texas and North Plains, Oregon.
Branson Tractors has tractors ranging in horsepower from 19 to 80. The 05 series has the 1905H tractor with 19 horsepower. The 00 series tractors have 2 models available with manual transmission or hydrostatic transmission. The 15 series has 8 models available in manual and hydrostatic tranmission with 30, 35, 40, and 48 horsepower. Their 20 series tractors have 12 models with a choice of manual or hydromax transmission, and ROPs or CAB available with air conditioned and heated cabs. There is also a model available with a cab and heat only for the Northern States. The 25 series has 8 models available in manual and hydrostatic transmisson with ROPs and Cab models with horsepower of 37 & 42. The 7845 model Branson Tractor is available in ROPS or Cab models. And the 8050 finishes off the models. Each model has a loader and backhoe available as well.


http://www.bransontractor.com/Home.aspx

gYNDBPh.jpg

My first was a 6530C back in 2007. Had more whistles and bells standard than any of the popular colors I had shopped 6 months earlier and passed over. Engine is a Cummins B 3.3 NA (4 cyl naturally aspired, direct injected, Tier II) built under license by Komatsu (the company that competes with JD and Cat. at heavy construction sites) in Japan. My second was a little "errand boy" 2400 I bought in 2016. It has the (Kukje, Cummins licensed) A1100 N 3 cyl swirl chamber, non tier (below 25 hp).

Dealers are close enough and one I used last had several stores, the main one in Sulphur Springs. When I need parts I call them and UPS delivers. I have blown out the right side door and right side rear window glasses and had replacements for both in my possession in just a few days. Only parts that take some time from Korea are peculiar parts, seldom used.

Obviously I think for the money, you can't beat them!

On the blown out windows, my drum mower did that even though it has a curtain on the front. It now has a metal shield and I have another I made that mounts to the bottom of my door with suction cups.....for those rocks that come in at a low angle and it's low enough so that it doesn't obstruct my vision. Enough of that.
 
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jltrent

jltrent

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My first was a 6530C back in 2007. Had more whistles and bells standard than any of the popular colors I had shopped 6 months earlier and passed over. Engine is a Cummins B 3.3 NA (4 cyl naturally aspired, direct injected, Tier II) built under license by Komatsu (the company that competes with JD and Cat. at heavy construction sites) in Japan. My second was a little "errand boy" 2400 I bought in 2016. It has the (Kukje, Cummins licensed) A1100 N 3 cyl swirl chamber, non tier (below 25 hp).

Dealers are close enough and one I used last had several stores, the main one in Sulphur Springs. When I need parts I call them and UPS delivers. I have blown out the right side door and right side rear window glasses and had replacements for both in my possession in just a few days. Only parts that take some time from Korea are peculiar parts, seldom used.

Obviously I think for the money, you can't beat them!

On the blown out windows, my drum mower did that even though it has a curtain on the front. It now has a metal shield and I have another I made that mounts to the bottom of my door with suction cups.....for those rocks that come in at a low angle and it's low enough so that it doesn't obstruct my vision. Enough of that.[/quote]

Thanks for the feedback, I bet the larger tractors have the B series Cummins in them.
 

Atimm693

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My employer had a hand in building the company.

We have 3 3550s and 2 4350s.

Two of the 3550's have 5ft bush hogs, the other is sitting in the shed with a rod hanging out of the block from abuse, it's now a parts tractor.

One 4350 has a loader and the other is used for raking hay or running the post pounder. I really like the 4350s, smooth, powerful for their size. Will start down to 20 or so unassisted. Live power and hydraulics, shuttle shift, 12 speeds forward and reverse, diff lock, and 540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft).

The instruments and electrical are not that well built on ours, but mechanically they have all been pretty good.

Ours are simple and you can tell they are a low end tractor, but they do the job and are dependable. I can not comment on the new ones as I have never even seen one in person.
 

Texasmark

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Atimm693":kbdmbr22 said:
My employer had a hand in building the company.

We have 3 3550s and 2 4350s.

Two of the 3550's have 5ft bush hogs, the other is sitting in the shed with a rod hanging out of the block from abuse, it's now a parts tractor.

One 4350 has a loader and the other is used for raking hay or running the post pounder. I really like the 4350s, smooth, powerful for their size. Will start down to 20 or so unassisted. Live power and hydraulics, shuttle shift, 12 speeds forward and reverse, diff lock, and 540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft).

The instruments and electrical are not that well built on ours, but mechanically they have all been pretty good.

Ours are simple and you can tell they are a low end tractor, but they do the job and are dependable. I can not comment on the new ones as I have never even seen one in person.

".........540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft)."

You don't. Like I said about "whistles and bells" on my 6530: It has a shuttle shifted (clutch accompanied) 12F and 12R with a creep selector that cuts the ground speed of any gear in half so I have a 24-24 tranny...and I have had situations where I used A1-creep. The shuttle is a fully synchronized F-R function, lever operated (lever where your turn signal is on your truck) that changes direction of the tractor in any gear as fast as you can move the lever and clutch pedal.....and that's fast and effortless...with no gear crunching.

My PTO is electrically operated. There is a PTO selector lever for 540, 790, and 1000 rpms. Just move the selector to your desired speed and push the PTO button ON. Obviously the actual rpms are a function of the engine rpms and the ratings are made at an engine rpm of 2600.

If you selected the Independent PTO position with the PTO selector switch, there are 24 oil bathed clutches that engage the PTO shaft. If you move it over to the "Live" you have the same things functioning in addition to the PTO power being interrupted by a switch on the clutch pedal such that you can interrupt the PTO spinning when you depress the clutch....similar to the old Ford's Live PTO function without the double clutch and wear and tear on your left knee......Branson has a softly sprung clutch pedal and no problem for my bad left knee.

I also have an "automatic" switch I can engage that will cut off the PTO any time the 3 pt is raised. The automatic switch functions: At the end of the row, you toggle the 3 pt "raise/lower" switch with your right thumb; 3 pt. raises and as it does the PTO shuts off, make the turn, toggle the switch the other direction, 3 pt is back down and coming down the PTO is reengaged, with the 3 pt. position exactly where you set it with the position of the manual "position control" lever...be it at the depth you were plowing, or setting the rotary cutter right back where you had it...skids just off the ground and turns it back on. The tractor also has the conventional "draft" control lever (Per the original Ferguson design) for plowing in irregular fields.

Unlike the JD 4020 I had, there is no swapping 540 and 1000 rpm shafts....just play with the switches and move the levers while you sit in the comfort of your air (compressor operated) sprung, high back, armrested, variable lumbar, variable seat back pitch equipped, fabric seat, steering with your tilt and telescoping hydrostatically driven steering wheel in your air conditioned cab with internal and external rear view mirrors and stereo radio.....all standard equipment.

Couple of other non-related luxuries it has are: A lever that is accessible at the rear where you hookup your implements that can vary the position of your lift arms and sway arms controlled by multiple position pins that allow you to set your arms exactly where you want them with the drop of a pin with no sway back and forth. Lift arm extenders are also standard. A one man hookup of an implement is a dream, not a chore!

Now whether or not other tractors have that option I have no idea. Obviously my 2400 doesn't. It's a bottom of the line bare bones guy.

Added reasons why I bought it:

The fuel consumption is rated at 0.046 gallons/hp being used/per hour. At 65 hp being used at 2600 rpms, that's 3 gallons of fuel per hour.
With it's hp and 4wd, vs 2wd for my JD 4010, 4020, and 4230 tractors, I can still use the same plowing implements running in mid range gears, 100-150 rpm drop when implement is in ground contact, without a lot of grunting. Torque curve peak on the Cummins is at 1600 and is relatively flat on out to where ever the pump is set. Mine is factory set to 2900 for the 2600 65 hp rating which is apparently conservative.

On what other tractors have, why would Kukje go to the trouble of getting the Cummins license to manufacture their engines to their specs with their plant and production process inspections and all that if they weren't going to use their engines. Cummins engine is another reasons I bought my Bransons. Check the model number of the engine. Cummins engines have their unique identifications.
 

True Grit Farms

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Texasmark":247gvmi8 said:
Atimm693":247gvmi8 said:
My employer had a hand in building the company.

We have 3 3550s and 2 4350s.

Two of the 3550's have 5ft bush hogs, the other is sitting in the shed with a rod hanging out of the block from abuse, it's now a parts tractor.

One 4350 has a loader and the other is used for raking hay or running the post pounder. I really like the 4350s, smooth, powerful for their size. Will start down to 20 or so unassisted. Live power and hydraulics, shuttle shift, 12 speeds forward and reverse, diff lock, and 540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft).

The instruments and electrical are not that well built on ours, but mechanically they have all been pretty good.

Ours are simple and you can tell they are a low end tractor, but they do the job and are dependable. I can not comment on the new ones as I have never even seen one in person.

".........540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft)."

You don't. Like I said about "whistles and bells" on my 6530: It has a shuttle shifted (clutch accompanied) 12F and 12R with a creep selector that cuts the ground speed of any gear in half so I have a 24-24 tranny...and I have had situations where I used A1-creep. The shuttle is a fully synchronized F-R function, lever operated (lever where your turn signal is on your truck) that changes direction of the tractor in any gear as fast as you can move the lever and clutch pedal.....and that's fast and effortless...with no gear crunching.

My PTO is electrically operated. There is a PTO selector lever for 540, 790, and 1000 rpms. Just move the selector to your desired speed and push the PTO button ON. Obviously the actual rpms are a function of the engine rpms and the ratings are made at an engine rpm of 2600.

If you selected the Independent PTO position with the PTO selector switch, there are 24 oil bathed clutches that engage the PTO shaft. If you move it over to the "Live" you have the same things functioning in addition to the PTO power being interrupted by a switch on the clutch pedal such that you can interrupt the PTO spinning when you depress the clutch....similar to the old Ford's Live PTO function without the double clutch and wear and tear on your left knee......Branson has a softly sprung clutch pedal and no problem for my bad left knee.

I also have an "automatic" switch I can engage that will cut off the PTO any time the 3 pt is raised. The automatic switch functions: At the end of the row, you toggle the 3 pt "raise/lower" switch with your right thumb; 3 pt. raises and as it does the PTO shuts off, make the turn, toggle the switch the other direction, 3 pt is back down and coming down the PTO is reengaged, with the 3 pt. position exactly where you set it with the position of the manual "position control" lever...be it at the depth you were plowing, or setting the rotary cutter right back where you had it...skids just off the ground and turns it back on. The tractor also has the conventional "draft" control lever (Per the original Ferguson design) for plowing in irregular fields.

Unlike the JD 4020 I had, there is no swapping 540 and 1000 rpm shafts....just play with the switches and move the levers while you sit in the comfort of your air (compressor operated) sprung, high back, armrested, variable lumbar, variable seat back pitch equipped, fabric seat, steering with your tilt and telescoping hydrostatically driven steering wheel in your air conditioned cab with internal and external rear view mirrors and stereo radio.....all standard equipment.

Couple of other non-related luxuries it has are: A lever that is accessible at the rear where you hookup your implements that can vary the position of your lift arms and sway arms controlled by multiple position pins that allow you to set your arms exactly where you want them with the drop of a pin with no sway back and forth. Lift arm extenders are also standard. A one man hookup of an implement is a dream, not a chore!

Now whether or not other tractors have that option I have no idea. Obviously my 2400 doesn't. It's a bottom of the line bare bones guy.

Without changing shafts your not going to run any 1000 pto equipment. Different splines and the tractor is to small anyway. Most tractor manufacturers have what they call an economy pto, the pto reaches 540 RPM at 1500 + or - engine RPM. Any tractor that has to run 2600 RPM to achieve 540 RPM at the pto shaft is a bad design.
 

Atimm693

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Texasmark":19x4sq0g said:
Atimm693":19x4sq0g said:
My employer had a hand in building the company.

We have 3 3550s and 2 4350s.

Two of the 3550's have 5ft bush hogs, the other is sitting in the shed with a rod hanging out of the block from abuse, it's now a parts tractor.

One 4350 has a loader and the other is used for raking hay or running the post pounder. I really like the 4350s, smooth, powerful for their size. Will start down to 20 or so unassisted. Live power and hydraulics, shuttle shift, 12 speeds forward and reverse, diff lock, and 540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft).

The instruments and electrical are not that well built on ours, but mechanically they have all been pretty good.

Ours are simple and you can tell they are a low end tractor, but they do the job and are dependable. I can not comment on the new ones as I have never even seen one in person.

".........540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft)."

You don't. Like I said about "whistles and bells" on my 6530: It has a shuttle shifted (clutch accompanied) 12F and 12R with a creep selector that cuts the ground speed of any gear in half so I have a 24-24 tranny...and I have had situations where I used A1-creep. The shuttle is a fully synchronized F-R function, lever operated (lever where your turn signal is on your truck) that changes direction of the tractor in any gear as fast as you can move the lever and clutch pedal.....and that's fast and effortless...with no gear crunching.

My PTO is electrically operated. There is a PTO selector lever for 540, 790, and 1000 rpms. Just move the selector to your desired speed and push the PTO button ON. Obviously the actual rpms are a function of the engine rpms and the ratings are made at an engine rpm of 2600.

If you selected the Independent PTO position with the PTO selector switch, there are 24 oil bathed clutches that engage the PTO shaft. If you move it over to the "Live" you have the same things functioning in addition to the PTO power being interrupted by a switch on the clutch pedal such that you can interrupt the PTO spinning when you depress the clutch....similar to the old Ford's Live PTO function without the double clutch and wear and tear on your left knee......Branson has a softly sprung clutch pedal and no problem for my bad left knee.

I also have an "automatic" switch I can engage that will cut off the PTO any time the 3 pt is raised. The automatic switch functions: At the end of the row, you toggle the 3 pt "raise/lower" switch with your right thumb; 3 pt. raises and as it does the PTO shuts off, make the turn, toggle the switch the other direction, 3 pt is back down and coming down the PTO is reengaged, with the 3 pt. position exactly where you set it with the position of the manual "position control" lever...be it at the depth you were plowing, or setting the rotary cutter right back where you had it...skids just off the ground and turns it back on. The tractor also has the conventional "draft" control lever (Per the original Ferguson design) for plowing in irregular fields.

Unlike the JD 4020 I had, there is no swapping 540 and 1000 rpm shafts....just play with the switches and move the levers while you sit in the comfort of your air (compressor operated) sprung, high back, armrested, variable lumbar, variable seat back pitch equipped, fabric seat, steering with your tilt and telescoping hydrostatically driven steering wheel in your air conditioned cab with internal and external rear view mirrors and stereo radio.....all standard equipment.

Couple of other non-related luxuries it has are: A lever that is accessible at the rear where you hookup your implements that can vary the position of your lift arms and sway arms controlled by multiple position pins that allow you to set your arms exactly where you want them with the drop of a pin with no sway back and forth. Lift arm extenders are also standard. A one man hookup of an implement is a dream, not a chore!

Now whether or not other tractors have that option I have no idea. Obviously my 2400 doesn't. It's a bottom of the line bare bones guy.

Added reasons why I bought it:

The fuel consumption is rated at 0.046 gallons/hp being used/per hour. At 65 hp being used at 2600 rpms, that's 3 gallons of fuel per hour.
With it's hp and 4wd, vs 2wd for my JD 4010, 4020, and 4230 tractors, I can still use the same plowing implements running in mid range gears, 100-150 rpm drop when implement is in ground contact, without a lot of grunting. Torque curve peak on the Cummins is at 1600 and is relatively flat on out to where ever the pump is set. Mine is factory set to 2900 for the 2600 65 hp rating which is apparently conservative.

On what other tractors have, why would Kukje go to the trouble of getting the Cummins license to manufacture their engines to their specs with their plant and production process inspections and all that if they weren't going to use their engines. Cummins engine is another reasons I bought my Bransons. Check the model number of the engine. Cummins engines have their unique identifications.

The 3550 and 4350 just have a shift lever below the seat. Clutch in, down is 540, up is 1000.

I do not know if the shafts can be swapped, I only know that there is a gear for 1000 rpm.
 

Texasmark

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Atimm693":14ywj3d0 said:
Texasmark":14ywj3d0 said:
Atimm693":14ywj3d0 said:
My employer had a hand in building the company.

We have 3 3550s and 2 4350s.

Two of the 3550's have 5ft bush hogs, the other is sitting in the shed with a rod hanging out of the block from abuse, it's now a parts tractor.

One 4350 has a loader and the other is used for raking hay or running the post pounder. I really like the 4350s, smooth, powerful for their size. Will start down to 20 or so unassisted. Live power and hydraulics, shuttle shift, 12 speeds forward and reverse, diff lock, and 540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft).

The instruments and electrical are not that well built on ours, but mechanically they have all been pretty good.

Ours are simple and you can tell they are a low end tractor, but they do the job and are dependable. I can not comment on the new ones as I have never even seen one in person.

".........540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft)."

You don't. Like I said about "whistles and bells" on my 6530: It has a shuttle shifted (clutch accompanied) 12F and 12R with a creep selector that cuts the ground speed of any gear in half so I have a 24-24 tranny...and I have had situations where I used A1-creep. The shuttle is a fully synchronized F-R function, lever operated (lever where your turn signal is on your truck) that changes direction of the tractor in any gear as fast as you can move the lever and clutch pedal.....and that's fast and effortless...with no gear crunching.

My PTO is electrically operated. There is a PTO selector lever for 540, 790, and 1000 rpms. Just move the selector to your desired speed and push the PTO button ON. Obviously the actual rpms are a function of the engine rpms and the ratings are made at an engine rpm of 2600.

If you selected the Independent PTO position with the PTO selector switch, there are 24 oil bathed clutches that engage the PTO shaft. If you move it over to the "Live" you have the same things functioning in addition to the PTO power being interrupted by a switch on the clutch pedal such that you can interrupt the PTO spinning when you depress the clutch....similar to the old Ford's Live PTO function without the double clutch and wear and tear on your left knee......Branson has a softly sprung clutch pedal and no problem for my bad left knee.

I also have an "automatic" switch I can engage that will cut off the PTO any time the 3 pt is raised. The automatic switch functions: At the end of the row, you toggle the 3 pt "raise/lower" switch with your right thumb; 3 pt. raises and as it does the PTO shuts off, make the turn, toggle the switch the other direction, 3 pt is back down and coming down the PTO is reengaged, with the 3 pt. position exactly where you set it with the position of the manual "position control" lever...be it at the depth you were plowing, or setting the rotary cutter right back where you had it...skids just off the ground and turns it back on. The tractor also has the conventional "draft" control lever (Per the original Ferguson design) for plowing in irregular fields.

Unlike the JD 4020 I had, there is no swapping 540 and 1000 rpm shafts....just play with the switches and move the levers while you sit in the comfort of your air (compressor operated) sprung, high back, armrested, variable lumbar, variable seat back pitch equipped, fabric seat, steering with your tilt and telescoping hydrostatically driven steering wheel in your air conditioned cab with internal and external rear view mirrors and stereo radio.....all standard equipment.

Couple of other non-related luxuries it has are: A lever that is accessible at the rear where you hookup your implements that can vary the position of your lift arms and sway arms controlled by multiple position pins that allow you to set your arms exactly where you want them with the drop of a pin with no sway back and forth. Lift arm extenders are also standard. A one man hookup of an implement is a dream, not a chore!

Now whether or not other tractors have that option I have no idea. Obviously my 2400 doesn't. It's a bottom of the line bare bones guy.

Added reasons why I bought it:

The fuel consumption is rated at 0.046 gallons/hp being used/per hour. At 65 hp being used at 2600 rpms, that's 3 gallons of fuel per hour.
With it's hp and 4wd, vs 2wd for my JD 4010, 4020, and 4230 tractors, I can still use the same plowing implements running in mid range gears, 100-150 rpm drop when implement is in ground contact, without a lot of grunting. Torque curve peak on the Cummins is at 1600 and is relatively flat on out to where ever the pump is set. Mine is factory set to 2900 for the 2600 65 hp rating which is apparently conservative.

On what other tractors have, why would Kukje go to the trouble of getting the Cummins license to manufacture their engines to their specs with their plant and production process inspections and all that if they weren't going to use their engines. Cummins engine is another reasons I bought my Bransons. Check the model number of the engine. Cummins engines have their unique identifications.

The 3550 and 4350 just have a shift lever below the seat. Clutch in, down is 540, up is 1000.

I do not know if the shafts can be swapped, I only know that there is a gear for 1000 rpm.

Interesting point you make here: "I do not know if the shafts can be swapped,.....". I don't know if mine could be swapped either now that you mention it. I have used the mid range for light mowing at low engine rpms (above 1600....slightly). Never used the 1000. So either the implement input shaft would need an adapter which is probably the correct solution, think I have seen them at TSC or Attwoods, or Gebos, again now that you mention it, or it's input shaft would need to be changed....not that big of a deal, just change the input yoke. on the input U joint.
 

Texasmark

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True Grit Farms":gvj73v60 said:
Texasmark":gvj73v60 said:
Atimm693":gvj73v60 said:
My employer had a hand in building the company.

We have 3 3550s and 2 4350s.

Two of the 3550's have 5ft bush hogs, the other is sitting in the shed with a rod hanging out of the block from abuse, it's now a parts tractor.

One 4350 has a loader and the other is used for raking hay or running the post pounder. I really like the 4350s, smooth, powerful for their size. Will start down to 20 or so unassisted. Live power and hydraulics, shuttle shift, 12 speeds forward and reverse, diff lock, and 540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft).

The instruments and electrical are not that well built on ours, but mechanically they have all been pretty good.

Ours are simple and you can tell they are a low end tractor, but they do the job and are dependable. I can not comment on the new ones as I have never even seen one in person.

".........540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft)."

You don't. Like I said about "whistles and bells" on my 6530: It has a shuttle shifted (clutch accompanied) 12F and 12R with a creep selector that cuts the ground speed of any gear in half so I have a 24-24 tranny...and I have had situations where I used A1-creep. The shuttle is a fully synchronized F-R function, lever operated (lever where your turn signal is on your truck) that changes direction of the tractor in any gear as fast as you can move the lever and clutch pedal.....and that's fast and effortless...with no gear crunching.

My PTO is electrically operated. There is a PTO selector lever for 540, 790, and 1000 rpms. Just move the selector to your desired speed and push the PTO button ON. Obviously the actual rpms are a function of the engine rpms and the ratings are made at an engine rpm of 2600.

If you selected the Independent PTO position with the PTO selector switch, there are 24 oil bathed clutches that engage the PTO shaft. If you move it over to the "Live" you have the same things functioning in addition to the PTO power being interrupted by a switch on the clutch pedal such that you can interrupt the PTO spinning when you depress the clutch....similar to the old Ford's Live PTO function without the double clutch and wear and tear on your left knee......Branson has a softly sprung clutch pedal and no problem for my bad left knee.

I also have an "automatic" switch I can engage that will cut off the PTO any time the 3 pt is raised. The automatic switch functions: At the end of the row, you toggle the 3 pt "raise/lower" switch with your right thumb; 3 pt. raises and as it does the PTO shuts off, make the turn, toggle the switch the other direction, 3 pt is back down and coming down the PTO is reengaged, with the 3 pt. position exactly where you set it with the position of the manual "position control" lever...be it at the depth you were plowing, or setting the rotary cutter right back where you had it...skids just off the ground and turns it back on. The tractor also has the conventional "draft" control lever (Per the original Ferguson design) for plowing in irregular fields.

Unlike the JD 4020 I had, there is no swapping 540 and 1000 rpm shafts....just play with the switches and move the levers while you sit in the comfort of your air (compressor operated) sprung, high back, armrested, variable lumbar, variable seat back pitch equipped, fabric seat, steering with your tilt and telescoping hydrostatically driven steering wheel in your air conditioned cab with internal and external rear view mirrors and stereo radio.....all standard equipment.

Couple of other non-related luxuries it has are: A lever that is accessible at the rear where you hookup your implements that can vary the position of your lift arms and sway arms controlled by multiple position pins that allow you to set your arms exactly where you want them with the drop of a pin with no sway back and forth. Lift arm extenders are also standard. A one man hookup of an implement is a dream, not a chore!

Now whether or not other tractors have that option I have no idea. Obviously my 2400 doesn't. It's a bottom of the line bare bones guy.

Without changing shafts your not going to run any 1000 pto equipment. Different splines and the tractor is to small anyway. Most tractor manufacturers have what they call an economy pto, the pto reaches 540 RPM at 1500 + or - engine RPM. Any tractor that has to run 2600 RPM to achieve 540 RPM at the pto shaft is a bad design.

Er ah sir: Cummins has built over 1 million engines world wide. I think they know their business! Engine HP is (engine torque in ft-lbs x engine rpm)/5252. Today's engines substitute rpms for large cubes and long strokes to fit into the chassis packages built today. I know of no popular tractor made in the last 10 years (for a number), in the compact category that doesn't run 2400-2800 substituting rpms for cubes to get the engine HP.

As I said earlier, my torque curve peaks at 1600, not 1000 like my old tractors who had the cubes and the torque and met spec at 1600-1800 rpms.
 

Atimm693

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Texasmark":5w6iek99 said:
Atimm693":5w6iek99 said:
Texasmark":5w6iek99 said:
".........540/1000 PTO (although I'm not sure how to change the shaft)."

You don't. Like I said about "whistles and bells" on my 6530: It has a shuttle shifted (clutch accompanied) 12F and 12R with a creep selector that cuts the ground speed of any gear in half so I have a 24-24 tranny...and I have had situations where I used A1-creep. The shuttle is a fully synchronized F-R function, lever operated (lever where your turn signal is on your truck) that changes direction of the tractor in any gear as fast as you can move the lever and clutch pedal.....and that's fast and effortless...with no gear crunching.

My PTO is electrically operated. There is a PTO selector lever for 540, 790, and 1000 rpms. Just move the selector to your desired speed and push the PTO button ON. Obviously the actual rpms are a function of the engine rpms and the ratings are made at an engine rpm of 2600.

If you selected the Independent PTO position with the PTO selector switch, there are 24 oil bathed clutches that engage the PTO shaft. If you move it over to the "Live" you have the same things functioning in addition to the PTO power being interrupted by a switch on the clutch pedal such that you can interrupt the PTO spinning when you depress the clutch....similar to the old Ford's Live PTO function without the double clutch and wear and tear on your left knee......Branson has a softly sprung clutch pedal and no problem for my bad left knee.

I also have an "automatic" switch I can engage that will cut off the PTO any time the 3 pt is raised. The automatic switch functions: At the end of the row, you toggle the 3 pt "raise/lower" switch with your right thumb; 3 pt. raises and as it does the PTO shuts off, make the turn, toggle the switch the other direction, 3 pt is back down and coming down the PTO is reengaged, with the 3 pt. position exactly where you set it with the position of the manual "position control" lever...be it at the depth you were plowing, or setting the rotary cutter right back where you had it...skids just off the ground and turns it back on. The tractor also has the conventional "draft" control lever (Per the original Ferguson design) for plowing in irregular fields.

Unlike the JD 4020 I had, there is no swapping 540 and 1000 rpm shafts....just play with the switches and move the levers while you sit in the comfort of your air (compressor operated) sprung, high back, armrested, variable lumbar, variable seat back pitch equipped, fabric seat, steering with your tilt and telescoping hydrostatically driven steering wheel in your air conditioned cab with internal and external rear view mirrors and stereo radio.....all standard equipment.

Couple of other non-related luxuries it has are: A lever that is accessible at the rear where you hookup your implements that can vary the position of your lift arms and sway arms controlled by multiple position pins that allow you to set your arms exactly where you want them with the drop of a pin with no sway back and forth. Lift arm extenders are also standard. A one man hookup of an implement is a dream, not a chore!

Now whether or not other tractors have that option I have no idea. Obviously my 2400 doesn't. It's a bottom of the line bare bones guy.

Added reasons why I bought it:

The fuel consumption is rated at 0.046 gallons/hp being used/per hour. At 65 hp being used at 2600 rpms, that's 3 gallons of fuel per hour.
With it's hp and 4wd, vs 2wd for my JD 4010, 4020, and 4230 tractors, I can still use the same plowing implements running in mid range gears, 100-150 rpm drop when implement is in ground contact, without a lot of grunting. Torque curve peak on the Cummins is at 1600 and is relatively flat on out to where ever the pump is set. Mine is factory set to 2900 for the 2600 65 hp rating which is apparently conservative.

On what other tractors have, why would Kukje go to the trouble of getting the Cummins license to manufacture their engines to their specs with their plant and production process inspections and all that if they weren't going to use their engines. Cummins engine is another reasons I bought my Bransons. Check the model number of the engine. Cummins engines have their unique identifications.

The 3550 and 4350 just have a shift lever below the seat. Clutch in, down is 540, up is 1000.

I do not know if the shafts can be swapped, I only know that there is a gear for 1000 rpm.

Interesting point you make here: "I do not know if the shafts can be swapped,.....". I don't know if mine could be swapped either now that you mention it. I have used the mid range for light mowing at low engine rpms (above 1600....slightly). Never used the 1000. So either the implement input shaft would need an adapter which is probably the correct solution, think I have seen them at TSC or Attwoods, or Gebos, again now that you mention it, or it's input shaft would need to be changed....not that big of a deal, just change the input yoke. on the input U joint.

On our big tractors (that don't have dual PTOs) you remove the snap ring and either flip the shaft over or install the 1000 RPM shaft. Only one has a shift lever, the others change from 540/1000 automatically depending on what shaft is installed.
 

chevytaHOE5674

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If there is no way to change the tractor to the proper 21 spline 1000rpm shaft then it's useless for anything requiring a 1000rpm pto. You don't want to be running some adaptor on heavy cv style shaft spinning at 1000rpm, as any slight vibration will shake things to death... and in most cases with a cv joint you can't just go changing the yoke over to a 540 style.
 

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Atimm693":ewj80zja said:
Texasmark":ewj80zja said:
Atimm693":ewj80zja said:
The 3550 and 4350 just have a shift lever below the seat. Clutch in, down is 540, up is 1000.

I do not know if the shafts can be swapped, I only know that there is a gear for 1000 rpm.

Interesting point you make here: "I do not know if the shafts can be swapped,.....". I don't know if mine could be swapped either now that you mention it. I have used the mid range for light mowing at low engine rpms (above 1600....slightly). Never used the 1000. So either the implement input shaft would need an adapter which is probably the correct solution, think I have seen them at TSC or Attwoods, or Gebos, again now that you mention it, or it's input shaft would need to be changed....not that big of a deal, just change the input yoke. on the input U joint.

On our big tractors (that don't have dual PTOs) you remove the snap ring and either flip the shaft over or install the 1000 RPM shaft. Only one has a shift lever, the others change from 540/1000 automatically depending on what shaft is installed.

My 4020 was like that. Change shafts and it connects to different gears in the drive train to get the right ratio; use the same PTO lever and all.
 

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