Brangus

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cypressfarms

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Melking,

Don't let everyone scare you. I've had and been around brangus more than 20 years. Are there some that are hot headed? Sure. Not as many as tigerstripes though. In general they aren't as docile as a hereford or beefmaster, but you can't judge a particular cow by it's breed's reputation. The tamest cow I ever had is a brangus. I would bring them a small amount of food a day, pour it in a trough and sit back on a mule/4 wheeler and watch. Let them get used to you, and you to them. I would only feed them as a small reward for coming to you when you call. They'll associate you with good things.

One thing I will say about Brangus is that you can't "push" a brangus. Some breeds of cattle don't mind being pushed/herded with a horse/4 wheeler, etc. Brangus do not generally like this. For brangus, I "pull" them. When it's time to work them I pull a feed trough along and they all follow me in the corral. If one doesn't follow, I may try to get behind her once and calmly persuade her, but I don't put much pressure. They will get fired up fairly quick, and then the whole group get's fired up. I train the cows by calling them everytime I move them; they pretty much know the drill, I call they come. My cows like to move to the next pasture (I rotate) every couple of days. One trick I do is keep them in a paddock by the corral for 4 or 5 days. This makes them much more likely to want to come through the catch pen. With Brangus you learn many little tricks to make things easier. I even tag the calves at birth, but I wouldn't recommend this for a newbie.

Having said the above I love brangus. They make great momas, and have done me well for years. I have beefmasters now as well, and have become partial to beefmasters. One thing I don't have with my brangus though; pinkeye or bloat. They seem to be less likely to suffer from these than other breeds.

Cross a brangus moma with a hereford and as caustic would say, the bell will ring at the stockyard. Brangus baldies bring premium prices around here, as feeder steers or replacement heifers.


I wouldn't really recommend them as starters, but you already have them so that's out. Sorry for being so long-winded, but I think Brangus get a bum rap sometimes. There not all bad. PM me if you want to talk Brangus anytime; and no I am not a seedstock seller and have nothing to gain by promoting Brangus
 

backhoeboogie

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Good post as usual Cypress.

Mine are shifted from pasture to pasture quite frequently. They'd follow my truck anywhere. If you honk the horn, or yell "Come On", you'd best be prepared for the stampede. They're coming at you. Drive into the alley and close them in. No herding to it.
 

alacattleman

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nobody trying to scare him,, just warn him,,, you dont walk up to one that just spit a calf out and say ahhh how pretty,, they will rearange your rib cage.... fact,,,, they are a cowmans cattle
 

TexasBred

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alacattleman":1mimsl0r said:
nobody trying to scare him,, just warn him,,, you dont walk up to one that just spit a calf out and say ahhh how pretty,, they will rearange your rib cage.... fact,,,, they are a cowmans cattle

Ain't it amazing how the personality of a cow can change milliseconds after she spits out a calf. Brangus are great mothers. Other than at calving time about all you have to worry about it getting licked or run over when you're trying to feed in the winter.
 

shaz

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My neighbor has Brangus. He does nothing with them or to his farm in general.
Question: Is it true that Brangus have longer productive lives than most other breeds??
 

alacattleman

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shaz said:
My neighbor has Brangus. He does nothing with them or to his farm in general.
Question: Is it true that Brangus have longer productive lives than most other breeds??[/quote]depends on the other breeds, composites ? cross's?, purebred brangus are a composite the brahman influence in them help contribute too their longevity
 
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melking

melking

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Thanks cypress, I really appreciate all of the comments in here but especially a reassuring one. I am not afraid of much, and I am not really afraid of this, I just don't want to harm the cows through my being unknowledgeable about them.
 

cypressfarms

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melking":25rsge62 said:
I just don't want to harm the cows through my being unknowledgeable about them.

Understandable, then you need to find a mentor and get to reading (university publications are a great source) if you don't feel confident enough. But I'll let you in on a secret. No one knows it all! If they say they do, their lying. I was lucky this year. I didn't lose one calf, only had to pull one from a heifer - although I still have one to go. Note the word lucky. Although I've pulled many calves, luck always helps. A friend of mine believes that you create your own luck by hard work, and that may well be true. Example: breeding your heifers to a low birth weight bull may seem a no-brainer, but this is tilting the odds in your favor to not have calving trouble. Truth is me, or any other producer will lose calves/cows. It's part of the business. The key is to not lose any that you could have saved by knowledge/skill. And your knowledge/skill should get better over time.


Having said that, good luck! :D
 

Caustic Burno

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alacattleman":1tpf3eus said:
shaz":1tpf3eus said:
My neighbor has Brangus. He does nothing with them or to his farm in general.
Question: Is it true that Brangus have longer productive lives than most other breeds??[/quote]depends on the other breeds, composites ? cross's?, purebred brangus are a composite the brahman influence in them help contribute too their longevity

I have some old enough to vote, the real secret is good grass. Good grass equals good teeth, BCS, longevity with a good herd health management system.
 

spinandslide

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Good post Cypress..:)

Melking, I agree..no one knows it all..we all are continously learning..I look at any snag or problem that I have as a learning experience...learn all you can so you can be as prepared as possible...and I am by FAR a newb in raising cattle...and I have made my fair share of mistakes which were incrediably stupid.. ;-)

I agree with feeding and simply letting them get used to you..My first cow was a Brangus range heifer..I highly doubt she saw a person but 3-4 times a year..she was abit of a handful..but I tell ya, she taught me alot..I spent alot of time feeding her and then simply sitting outside her pasture..as others said, they get curious and amble over. almost 2 years later, she has mellowed out greatly and enjoys top "beach" status in my small group..she comes when I call her and she'll follow me anywhere for a cube or a handful of sweetfeed. I still always remember..with any of my animals..how much they outweigh me..I dont give them an inch..
Time and patience..your brangus heifers will teach you alot. Ive always liked the breed, but owning this cow has REALLY made me like the breed..they have alot to offer.
 
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